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Lots of unburned gas

2539 Views 24 Replies 7 Participants Last post by  Wendell
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I was just turned on to this forum and have been reviewing your posts. I'm glad I found you.

I'm the new owner of an 82 GL1100 with only 7,000 miles on it. Having sat for 22 years, Cletus was in for a carb rebuild in May of this year. He has been running smoothly except for what feels like retarded acceleration when I give him gas at cruising speed. Recently I noticed a LOT of gas dripping from the weep hole in the right side exhaust. Thinking that perhaps I was not getting spark to one of the cylinders I checked, but found that I am getting spark to both No. 1 and No. 3. With the engine at idle speed I can take the spark plug wire off of the No. 1 plug and the engine continues to idle smoothly; when I disconnect any other plug wire there is an immediate change in the idle. I drained the float bowl on No. 1 and then started Cletus again with the same result. So, Cletus will still idle smoothly, has spark to all cylinders, will continue to idle smoothly even with the No. 1 plug wire pulled off the plug, and is pouring large amounts of gas into the exhaust pipe on the right side.

O.K.,friends, where do I start?

Since I'm new let me say again that I'm glad a friend sent me your way. Let me thank you in advance for your help.

Larry
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Larry, another way to look for the problem cylinder would be to use compressed air. If your compression tester is a two piece design with a quick connect, try your air hose connector on it, if it fits, you are in business. If not, try to get an adapter from NAPA that would screw into the plug hole. They are available as I have two different sizes I have used to put air into cylinders for valve seal replacements. Dial your compressor regulator down a quite a bit, as high psi is not needed nor recommended. You will also need to make sure your piston is positioned in the down-stroke just before TDC. Hook your air up and seeif you get any hissing out of your airbox or exhaust. You'll need to listen closely. A burned valve will leak, whether the engine is hot or not. If you heara lot of hissing (some is normal) inside of the engine block, your rings on that piston would be suspect. With that pressure on the piston, try to manually turn the engine over with a wrench (yeah, you gotta get to the crank bolt). Do not use the starter to do this!If it turns very easily,and there is no hissing coming from the airbox or exhaust, then I would bet the rings are the problem.You should have a decent amount of resistance when trying to turnover the crank since it is coming up on the compression stroke.A compression test will give you the same results, but it will not tell you the rings or the valves. I have used this on all kinds of vehicles. Hope this helps! BTW, make sure you have the tool you are turning the crank with off of that crank bolt before pressurizing any cylinder! That thang wil fly off to holy :cooldevil:if you don't and damage the bike or possibly your noggin'!
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If you pull on the choke cable you are closeing the choke butterfly.Thus restricting the flow of air into the cylinder .Just open the throttle. From long time experence with engines if you are in close range on compression test and above 100 lbs you should be ok. But go ahead and do a wet test as it may point to other problem. Another thing is don't let us put you through hoops on this thing.Follow your gut instinct.Keep it vertical.Fred
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No choke plate in the Wing. Won't make any difference in compression testing, the throttles should all be open however.
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You may remember that my problem on my 82 Interstate is LOTS of gas coming out of the weep hole in my right exhaust. I've determined that my compression is fine; I do have spark to all cylinders; but No. 1 is not combusting properly, in fact, the header on No. 1 stays cool while the other 3 get hot.

I've pulled the carbs and looked at the float on No. 1. It is adjusted so that it is about 16mm at the end of the float near the float arm, but is 19mm at the opposite end!!

So, this leads me to two questions: 1. Is the float being this much out of adjustment likely to be the cause of No. 1 flooding so much that the spark plug can't ignite the fule mixture? I'd love to think that this simple thing might be the cause of my problem.

2. I know that the bottom of the float is supposed to be 15.5mm from the carb body. I'm not quite sure what part of the float mechanism I'm supposed to bend. Am I supposed to remove the float pin and bend each float where its arm attaches to the float; or do I bend in the middle of the "arm assembly" where the tab with the spring is located?

I've got the Honda manual, and I've read Randakk's instructions, but I'm still not sure exactly where to bend.

Thanks,

Larry
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Larry, you make the adjustment where the float needle touches the float tang. Make sure to make little adjustments or you could break that tang off. I found that when adjusting the float, don't set the carbs upside down since the weight of the float will compress the pin on the float needle. I also temporarily removed the clip that held the needle onto the float, making easier to quickly remove the float for adjustments.

It is possible to flood your #1 plug if your carb is out bad enough. Remember, gasoline is volitile in vapor form only, so a whole lot of raw gas could drown out that plug. HTH!
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