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I was watching Ride Like A Pro to learn techniques for low speed maneuvering. "Motorman" recommends ~1500 rpms while applying light rear break and riding the friction zone.

I like the technique, but I'm curious how hard is this on the clutch?
 

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From what I have read and since we have a wet clutch then it does not affect it. I have not had any problems. Maybe more will chime in.
 

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Only if you over heat the plates, you will know this because they will suddenly become very loose/slippery, just like overheating the brakes by riding them constantly down a mountain. If it does this then park the bike for a few minutes and let her cool down.
The only time I have seen this is in parade mode doing precision drill team moves for a while in the heat of summer. Also boiling the gas and getting hydro-locked in the cylinders/carbs.

You should be able to slip the clutch to keep some power at low speeds whilst controlling the bikes speed with the rear brake, skills needed to pass any motorcycle test, and taught by the MSF in the Beginner Rider Course.
 

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That's how they taught us to do it in the MSF class, I've been doin' it the whole time and haven't had a problem.:? I thought it was just the way it was done.
 

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The "Hot Tip" would really be.............don't even THINK of touching the FRONT brake in slow speed maneuvering!

Please don't ask how I know or how many times it took to sink in!

T.
 

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on any clutch it is not hard on it thats what the clutch is for riding like that will not burn out your clutch now if your going down the road at 80mph and hold the clutch just enuf to make it slip then yeah that will destroy the clutch


just use it like you normally would no diffrent than a car or truck with a clutch
 

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Since the power level in maneuvering is very low, just above idling slipping the clutch isn't going to do any appreciable wear. The idea is to be pretty light on the rear brake so you don't need to get the clutch much past the initial friction point. The linked brakes on the Goldwing don't make a lot of difference since the rear brake pedal as long as you keep the power level down so you don't need to use very much pedal. The technique worked a bit better for me on an unlinked 1100 but not much. I used to be able to do figure eights lock to lock on the handlebars with no trouble. I find the 1800 even easier to do slow speed maneuvering than the 1500. I'm not quite sure why.
 

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We have Range Bikes (250cc) that have over 5 years of slipping the clutch in slow maneauvers and they still perform as they should. Just doing it occasionally will not heat the clutch plates to the point of causing premature wear or failure; especially on wet clutches like ours.

dubs
 

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Thanks everyone for your inputs on this. It was very helpful. Gonna go to practicing as soon as the parking lot dries out :action::action:
 

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I prefer not to touch the rear brake unless absolutely necessary. Bike slows quickly enough when pulling in the clutch at such low speeds.:action:
 

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Keeping some drag on the rear wheel will help stabilize the bike in low speed turns.
 

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exavid wrote:
Keeping some drag on the rear wheel will help stabilize the bike in low speed turns.
Car tire on the back must solve that problem.

I can turn the bars to their extreme and ride in small circles all day in either direction and never touch the rear brake.:action:
 

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in everyday use you will probabily not overheat the cluch because you will not be on it long enough.I took this course and after each exercise they make you take a couple of laps around the lot to cool the cluch plates down.So if you are praticing I would suggest that you do the same one guy actually burnt up his cluch and had to have his bike picked up but i suspect that his cluch was already compromised.I compleated the course without any problems and got a great education on slow speed maneuvers
 

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blackknytecnc wrote:
That's how they taught us to do it in the MSF class, I've been doin' it the whole time and haven't had a problem.:? I thought it was just the way it was done.
Yeah, it's just basic riding skills and is the way it's done.
 
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