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Good morning to all, my bike goes through 2 batteries during the riding season. I feel that this is not right. I had someone totell me it is the magnito (alternator) on the bike that is not charging my battery. Yes I do keep a battery tender on my bike and after a couple of starts I have to clutch my bike to start it. My question to all is if it is the magnito is this something that I can install?Where is it located and do anyone have an idea of the price for it.I welcome all feed back on this issue.





Thanks :)
 

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Not sure exactly what you're trying to say. A magneto is used to generate electricity for an ignition system, usually on equipment that doesn't have a battery. It's not the same thing as an alternator. Also not sure what you mean by "after a couple of starts I have to clutch my bike to start it". Does this mean the battery is too low on power to turn it over and you need to "push start" it by getting it rolling then letting out the clutch?

If your bike is going through 2 batteries per season, I'd look at a few things. First, your battery tender. If it's actually a battery charger or even a defective tender, it may be overcharging the battery. Do you regularly check the water level? If allowed to run dry your battery will not last long.

Second, your bike, which is roughly 30 years old. Remove your battery and wipe it clean (especially the top around the fill caps). Use a baking soda and water solutions to clean the terminals. You can also use this to clean the corrosion from the ends of the cables. Check the water level in the cells and fill with distilled water as needed (must be between the lines that indicate high and low levels). Clean the battery terminals thoroughly. Reinstall the battery, clean the cables and reconnect them to the battery. Check your battery voltage. If fully charged it should read about 13.6 volts. Start bike and let it warm. Check your voltage again at idle. It will likely read 12-12.5 volts. Rev the engine to 3000 rpms while checking the voltage. You should see it increase to around 14 volts. If so, your stator is good and your charging system is working.

There's a connector near the battery with 3 yellow wires which come from the stator. This connector can rob power and if it fails, can ruin your battery and worse, your stator. Remove the connector from it's holder, and try to pull the connnector apart (mine was welded together). If the connector comes apart, check the connections to make sure they're clean. Check the wires going it each side of the connector. They should be bright yellow. If there is any indication of corrosion or heat, cut out the connection and solder the wires together. Do a search on here and you'll find very good instructions on how to do it right the first time.

Check all your ground connections. Best to take them all apart, clean and reassemble.

One other thing I'd look at is the starter. If they're not clean inside (again, do a search on taking them apart and cleaning), they'll drain a lot of power from your otherwise good battery, making it seem like it's not doing it's job.

Hope this helps, and let us know how it turns out.

Steve
 

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Is this your Goldwing you have the problem with, or another bike? The GL1100 has a stator. Have you measured the voltage going into it with a meter?
Also you should really repost this in the technical forum or get this thread moved there, maybe edit the title yourself to something better than "magneto" if the problem is with your Goldwing.
 

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carltonknigh wrote:
Thanks you have answered all questions, I will check it all out.
But the questions asked of you have not been answered. As in "Does this mean the battery is too low on power to turn it over and you need to "push start" it by getting it rolling then letting out the clutch?"
 

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Are we talking about a Goldwing or a different motorcycle? You will get a lot more help if you clear that up for us.
 

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What this means is that about after 3 months my battery lose charge and I have to push it or look for a hill so that I can clutch it. I am using a Die Hard Battery. I am not sure why the battery does not hold a charge this is the second battery that I have changed.
 

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WELL...the stator is inside the rear of the engine..it can be changed but you have to pull the engine out of the bike to do it..testing the stator goes like this

Check the three yellow wire connector just forward of the battery. If it looks okay or it's been spliced out like most have been, disconnect the three yellow wires, cut them if necessary and connect a volt meter with a 100V AC scale across any two of the three wires coming from the stator (back of the engine). With the engine running you should see around 40-50VAC across any combination of the three wires. If all three combinations of any two of the three wires shows that voltage then the stator is okay. If any pair of the yellow wires is a good bit lower than the other two combinations you have a defective stator. If the voltage is okay in the test the problem is not the stator, could be the battery, regulator. Check the battery by measuring the voltage across the battery with the engine off. Start the engine and measure the voltage across the battery with the engine running around 2500-3000rpm. You should see a couple more volts than with the engine not running. If you do see that your battery is suspect and should be load tested. If you don't see the rise in voltage then it's likely your rectifier/regulator needs to be checked/replaced???

Regulator/rectifier test:

I used a digital meter, an analog should work as well.

The regulator/rectifier consists of a series of diodes that make DC out of the AC that the stator supplies.
Using an Ohm-meter we check if these diodes are good or not. You will be making a resistance (Ohm) reading.

Wires / terminals on the regulator/rectifier plug:
- 2x Red with white stripe. This is DC out to bat.
- 3x Yellow. Stator AC in
- 2x Green. Ground.
- 1x Black with green stripe. Sense line in.

Test 1...
Take the black lead from the ohm meter and place it on either GREEN terminal.
Take the red lead from the meter and measure each YELLOW terminal.
You should get readings of around 5-40 Ohms

Reverse the leads and measure again. The readings now should show no continuity or infinity or open line.

Test 2..
Take the red lead from the ohm meter and place it on either Red/White terminal.
Take the black lead from the meter and measure each YELLOW terminal.
You should get readings of around 5-40 Ohms

Reverse the leads and measure again. The readings now should show no continuity or infinity or open line.

Plug the regulator / rectifier back in and start the bike. Bring the rpms up to ~ 3000.
Measure the voltage at the plug between the GREEN and Red/White wires. Record this reading.

Now measure at the battery. The reading should be close to the same +- .5 V.

My readings were over 1 V difference, indicating a wiring issue somewhere (corroded or dirty connections)

- The stator wiring had already been soldered and heat-shrunk tubing installed. If you still have the OEM plug, get rid of this as it will cause problems.
 
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