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gw 1500 my 1995, a bike wich i dunno the real maintenance, has 63.000 km...

i checked the timing belts shortly ago and the right one was in need to be tighted...,

now during the winter time i will have the tome to do a major tune up in wich i will do:
air filter, fuel filter, sparks, oil and oil filter (done already 12.000 km ago by me..) normal

is it necessary to change the cruise filter and sub filter? not knowing the history of the bike i belive yes...

then i am considering to change the timing belts, anyone can suggest me another less expensive brand then honda but with equal quality?

looking at how to change the timing belts...., it would be better to discharge all the colant fluid....., i was guessing after looking at the radiator hoses....., wouldn't be suggested to change those rubber hoses after 15 years or good to keep them like that??? an old meccanic told me: sometimes there are things in old bikes which is better not even to think to touch.....when they get old...., otherwise you will start a chain reaction ... :)
 

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By all means, change those belts!! Gates T-275 is a good replacement. Also, the sub/cruise filters are very bad for crumbling and getting sucked into the carbs/cruise actuator. Very cheap to replace. You can change the belts without draining the coolant. If you will fly me over there I'll do it for you!! lol Always thought Italy is so beautiful. Welcome to the forums. jimsjinx
 

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jimsjinx wrote:
By all means, change those belts!! Gates T-275 is a good replacement. Also, the sub/cruise filters are very bad for crumbling and getting sucked into the carbs/cruise actuator. Very cheap to replace. You can change the belts without draining the coolant. If you will fly me over there I'll do it for you!! lol Always thought Italy is so beautiful. Welcome to the forums. jimsjinx

Thanks buddy, and of course you are more then welcome to come to italy ;-) you'd be surprised to know i'v been in alabama...
 

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The timing belts are fairly easy to replace, I just replace mine. No need to drain the coolant but seeing how you doing a complete tune up you may as well take care of that also. There is an air duct line that you'll need to remove, it just makes it allot easier to remove the timing belt covers. Once you have them removed you'll need to loosen the belt adjusters and remove the pulse generators, then slide the belts off, piece of cake.
 

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I took the 'easy' route with mine-- I had removed the forks so they could be overhauled so I had lots of room. Personally, if you are doing all this work it would be good to change the coolant anyway and make sure to at least give the hoses a thourough exam- squeeze them a bit to look for cracks, look carefully where they are banded to the metal, that sort of thing. As for the belts, yes, do them. It is easier than it looks. If you need more room there are a couple other things you can disconnect very easily while you are there. I had to disconnect some electrical sensor thing on the bottom left (whls sitting on the floor in front of it) so I could get it all back easy. Very simple. I ordered the Gates 275 belts for about $18 each (american) from Amazon.com.
Also consider flushing the brakes/clutch (very easy with dot-4 fluid) and do not forget to check brake pads. Drain and refill the rear end, too.
 

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rpeters549 wrote:
I took the 'easy' route with mine-- I had removed the forks so they could be overhauled so I had lots of room. Personally, if you are doing all this work it would be good to change the coolant anyway and make sure to at least give the hoses a thourough exam- squeeze them a bit to look for cracks, look carefully where they are banded to the metal, that sort of thing. As for the belts, yes, do them. It is easier than it looks. If you need more room there are a couple other things you can disconnect very easily while you are there. I had to disconnect some electrical sensor thing on the bottom left (whls sitting on the floor in front of it) so I could get it all back easy. Very simple. I ordered the Gates 275 belts for about $18 each (american) from Amazon.com.
Also consider flushing the brakes/clutch (very easy with dot-4 fluid) and do not forget to check brake pads. Drain and refill the rear end, too.
yep it all sounds very wisdom! and this is what i will be going to do and since i will have my dad coming back to italy from the u.s.a. in 2 weeks or so....i will have him bringing me back few things such as the timing belts that i cannot find in here except the orig. honda...cost like a mortgage...

funny life ha? last year i was driving from seattle to portland and without knowing it...., i passed close to your town! i spent a night in a place forgotten by god named rosenburg.....:ROFL::ROFL:

nice area orengon and washington! :waving: few time i drove by the gorge?....wow.....what a view!
 

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I will admit Roseburg is not my favorite town, but the county fair is nice.
Be glad you avoided Klamath Falls...

(JK to all you K-falls people! please do not shoot at me.)

Odds of me getting to Italy-- pret darn near zero though it would be great.

Enjoy!!
 

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jimsjinx wrote:
By all means, change those belts!! Gates T-275 is a good replacement. Also, the sub/cruise filters are very bad for crumbling and getting sucked into the carbs/cruise actuator. Very cheap to replace. You can change the belts without draining the coolant. If you will fly me over there I'll do it for you!! lol Always thought Italy is so beautiful. Welcome to the forums. jimsjinx
Now wait a minute jim. I've been to Italy before so I should have first crack at it!!!!!!!!:cheesygrin::cool: But by all means DO the belts and sub filters. I found some packing material here at work and it did a VERY good job at replacement for the originals. The cruise sub crumbled when it was taken out so it would not have been long.
 

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In the US it's easy to get lawn mower air filter material. The green foam stuff. You can get a filter for a couple dollars that is large enough to cut into several sub and cruise filters with a pair of scissors. It's important to make sure that sub filter is changed every couple years. They do break up and can get into the vacuum lines and check valves making all kinds of mischief.
 

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exavid wrote:
In the US it's easy to get lawn mower air filter material. The green foam stuff. You can get a filter for a couple dollars that is large enough to cut into several sub and cruise filters with a pair of scissors. It's important to make sure that sub filter is changed every couple years. They do break up and can get into the vacuum lines and check valves making all kinds of mischief.

Valves? But aren't they self registering in the 1500?
 

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Not intake/exhaust valves, but vacuum valves and such. The small dried bits of foam can block these closed or open and affect how your bike runs. There is a fair amount of vacuum line/valve type stuff hiding on the 1500 motor.
 

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rpeters549 wrote:
Not intake/exhaust valves, but vacuum valves and such. The small dried bits of foam can block these closed or open and affect how your bike runs. There is a fair amount of vacuum line/valve type stuff hiding on the 1500 motor.

This topic is getting more and more interesting to me! A fair amount of them hiding??!! Woooo woooo what am i missing in here?!
I'v been looking at this gw outside and inside and i must admit that there is more stuff inside this bike then in a car engine! Lol but i mever noticed and knew about so many valves and vacuum lines :-(
 

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You might want to consider the fork oil & the final drive gear oil change,

also check the rubber boot on the rear shock , it can spilt, and they can be expensive to replace if dirt gets behind those seals.also replace break&clutch fluids, check front& back break pads for wear.
 

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FREESPIRIT wrote:
You might want to consider the fork oil & the final drive gear oil change,

also check the rubber boot on the rear shock , it can spilt, and they can be expensive to replace if dirt gets behind those seals.also replace break&clutch fluids, check front& back break pads for wear.
ha!!!! this one i did it the day after i got the bike...i changed the springs with a pair of progressive ones...and new oil!:cheesygrin:
also the the final drive gear did it..and just re-changed the oil after 13.000 km..., rear shocks....gone...., i putted up brand new 416's.., then all break pads before my summer trip over the alps which took me almost 9 days and sort of 4000 km of muntains...all weather conditions....:D.

i still haven't really figuered out how to change the oil on the breaks... i don't have a vacuum pump and i guess is gonna take me a all day to have it done in a traditional way?...

also clutch...that scares me a bit....:praying:, i have seen how to...but i am more worried about that one then the timing belts! am i drunk or what? lol!

btw....who was the irish old man on a yellow 1800 gw with an irish license plate together with another irish with a vilkire this mid august aver the dolomites ???:ROFL:
 

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FREESPIRIT wrote:
From what i am reading, you are well on your way to maintaining your bike.

good luck to yer.:waving:
a bike is like a woman....is never enough whatever you do.... lol
and in any case...the 1500 when i push...it still has that horrible wobbling..., and yep i know....i cannot pretend to have a 1800 lol
 

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pippomaranga wrote:
FREESPIRIT wrote:
You might want to consider the fork oil & the final drive gear oil change,

also check the rubber boot on the rear shock , it can spilt, and they can be expensive to replace if dirt gets behind those seals.also replace break&clutch fluids, check front& back break pads for wear.
ha!!!! this one i did it the day after i got the bike...i changed the springs with a pair of progressive ones...and new oil!:cheesygrin:
also the the final drive gear did it..and just re-changed the oil after 13.000 km..., rear shocks....gone...., i putted up brand new 416's.., then all break pads before my summer trip over the alps which took me almost 9 days and sort of 4000 km of muntains...all weather conditions....:D.

i still haven't really figuered out how to change the oil on the breaks... i don't have a vacuum pump and i guess is gonna take me a all day to have it done in a traditional way?...

also clutch...that scares me a bit....:praying:, i have seen how to...but i am more worried about that one then the timing belts! am i drunk or what? lol!

btw....who was the irish old man on a yellow 1800 gw with an irish license plate together with another irish with a vilkire this mid august aver the dolomites ???:ROFL:

A piece of rubber tubing or Tygon tubing to fit the bleeder then long enough to hit the floor. Put a jar with fresh fluid in it and the tubing in the fluid and make sure the reservoir is never out then open the bleeder and slowly squeeze the brake, or clutch, whichever you are doing and before you know it, you're done.
 
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