Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,328 Posts
imported post

http://www.powerchutes.com/manometer.asp here you go

I would add resistors at the ends so you can reduce the vacuum..either glue in very narrow tubes, like the red straws for spray cans or buy some aquarium air valves that you can shut down put them as close to the ends as possible.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
155 Posts
imported post

Quite honestly, William, you would probably be happier with the results if you saved your pennies and bought one. I have tried two different routes to make one and although they both worked to a degree I was always frustrated by the difficulty of using them. I am not a total klutz and have a very well equipped shop but there would be so many hours into building one that had the proper restriction metering, andcalibration capabilities that all the u built units I have seen are far too simple to be effective. This year I bought one and couldn't be happier with the ease of use and very accurate results. It cost considerably less than one visit to a mechanic would.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8 Posts
imported post

I'm at this juction now, too, carb synch is next, and am wondering which tool you're using. In this area, carb synch costs $65-135, which makes no sense. They all say they're going to do x,y,z but I guess it depends what the market will bear. I can put together a two-dial unit for less than $30. I'm about to buy parts but can you tell more of your story? Thanks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
155 Posts
imported post

The first manometer I made consisted of a long narrow board with four 1/16" ID vinyl tubes fastened to it, filled with a quantity of coloured antifrieze. I used aquarium valves for restrictors. It was large, it was awkward, and it was a real pain to calibrate, but the scale was so large it would have been possible to be quite acurate if everything else had been right. The next try was simply four analog vacuum guages with small marsh needle valvesfor restriction. The guages had screw type adjusters to calibrate but they were not a jewelled movement and had such stiction that the needles would not move with the carb adjustment, then they would jump and the adjustment would be too great.

This year I bought a Motion Pro SyncPro manometer (Pt. No. 08-0411) and couldn't be happier. Very easy to calibrate, easy to read, and comes with the neccesary fittings and hoses. There is also the Morgan tune which I am told is also an excellent tool. I paid over $130 at the stealership, knowing full well that I was being robbed but in retrospect it was worth every penny. I believe they sell for under $100online. I think part of the choice may depend on which side of the Atlantic you call home, since if I am not mistaken the Morgan tune is made in the UK.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
26,561 Posts
imported post

I made one just like in the posted link and there is no way a factory made manometer could do a better job, you can get them synched perfectly with it where gauges just don't have a fine enough scale to be that accurate. You can buy adapters or make your own by threading a piece of 3/16 steel brake line threaded to 5mm.
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

I've got two carb sync tools, one I made up out of a couple vacuum gauges from Harbor Freight and a couple aquarium air valves for restrictors. The other I made from a 1X2X36" board that I grooved with a dado blade in my table saw, laid vinyl tubing in the grooves and fastened them down with staples every 6". This time I used a couple of plastic drip irrigation valves for restrictors which works well. A 10X10 wood base made out of a piece of 2X10 makes a base so the gauge will stand up.

Both tools work well, the HF gauges and aquarium valves cost me about $22 and the manometer cost about $3 for the two valves and the vinyl tube. No doubt a factory made four carb unit would be faster to use, but I doubt it would be any more accurate.

The link to the manometer refers it being used on a Rotax 2 stroke. I had an Avid Flyer amateur built airplane powered by a Rotax 582 dual carb engine. Two strokes are a lot easier to balance since the power strokes come more often so they don't need so much restriction in the balancer lines to reduce the fluctuations.

If you make a balancer be sure to adjust it so that you have a little flutter in the vacuum gauge needles, that will prevent 'stiction' or stick-slip problems with meter friction. With the manometer you'll need some restriction since the two four cycle carbs apply suction to the balance ports alternately. If the manometer has no restriction at all the fluid is going to be sucked out. Restriction allows a slow enough response to the varying suction to pretty much even out the pulses and give a reasonably steady reading.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,398 Posts
imported post

I just made one from 20' of clear PVC tubing, some zip ties, ATF fluid and a stick. Buy the synch fittings and you're golden.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,631 Posts
imported post

http://www.carbtune.com/ Made in Belfast, Northern Ireland. I got a set about 30 years ago, just need to clean the mercury from time to time. These days they have a synthetic version. Check website, go to "your bike" and scroll down.

Kinking the tubing can help ease the fluctuations or slightly pinching it with a clothspin
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
294 Posts
imported post

I used oil in mine and for restricterstook two small pieces of dowel and drilled a hole down their lenth with the smallest drill I have. Shove them in the ends of the tubes, works like a charm.

Tom
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,624 Posts
imported post

Just bought the Carbtune unit after seeing it used down at Calhoun. Works great. Payed for it's self after the second bike. It's more professional looking in the shop where customers are allowed to come in and watch.:waving:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
733 Posts
imported post

Wingle wrote:
http://www.carbtune.com/ Made in Belfast, Northern Ireland. I got a set about 30 years ago, just need to clean the mercury from time to time. These days they have a synthetic version. Check website, go to "your bike" and scroll down.

Kinking the tubing can help ease the fluctuations or slightly pinching it with a clothspin
from their website:

Goldwing 6 cylinder - Sorry, it won't work on the 6 cylinder model. They have two carbs and give very high readings.
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

That's why I like my two gauge unit and the homemade manometer, it works on the four and six cylinder 'Wings.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top