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ɹoᴉuǝS ɯoʇsnƆ
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Discussion Starter #1
I am replacing the windscreen on my sidecar. I have the replacement, now I need to make holes to attach it to the car itself.
Any advice on how to make these holes?
Drill them?
Use a "hot poker" to melt the holes?

Thanks
 

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Hey Chewie,

There are special drill bits for poly or you could use a really dull standard twist bit. I've also heard of using a drill bit run in reverse. Make sure when you do drill that you have a firm backstop to minimize spalling when the bit comes out the back side. Oh, and definitely test your drill method on a piece of scrap POLLY before going after the real deal!

Some other tips:
- use a drill press if you can
- masking tape the area to keep the bit from "walking"
- a bit made for drilling metal is better than one for wood
 

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After the holes are drilled,chamfer the holes,you don’t want sharp edges on the holes,it will crack out.
By all means step drill the hole.
 

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I would think a brad point bit would be best.
 

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I used a hardwood brad point bit for the windshields of stock cars. I only had to drill 3/16" though. (Beware that some are left handed) No problem at all. Just be a little patient and don't force it.
 

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The problem with drilling these materials is not their hardness. Any metalwork drill bit will work. The problem is when you punch through the material (when the drill bit comes out the other side), your drill will want to twist in your hand. If the drill twists even a little, the plastic WILL crack.
So you want to either go VERY slow with very little hand force on the drill as the bit is about to exit or have a backing block of wood firmly against the hole. Pilot holes not really necessary.
Also, you do want to drill the hole slightly oversized. This is so that as the material expands and contracts with temperature, it won't seize up against the bolt resulting in a crack.
 

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It has been my experience that when drilling plastics, a step drill bit will produce a round hole. A standard drill bit will produce an elongated or oval hole. No, I have not used it on windshield material, but the process should still hold. As stated earlier, try a scrap piece if you can.
 

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If you're using LEXAN don't have to worry about cracking, it will never crack.
Acrilic is the one that may crack and sure it will do!.
Mario
Never knew that. Thought they were the same. I googled it and I'll be darned. Thanks for the info. :)
 

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No, lexan, isn't plexiglass. I've made several windshields for the GL1200, all out of lexan. They can be bent all to hell, without breaking. They're highly scratch resistant. It's possible to use 1/8 or 3/16 thick Lexan for windshields. (I use 1/8) Best part is- About $40 bucks for a windshield. All you need is your old windshield for a form for a new one.

If you go that route, go buy a detail saw at Menard's. That saw cuts at variable speed, and the plastic will not weld itself behind the cut. Uses coping saw blades.
 

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No, lexan, isn't plexiglass. I've made several windshields for the GL1200, all out of lexan. They can be bent all to hell, without breaking. They're highly scratch resistant. It's possible to use 1/8 or 3/16 thick Lexan for windshields. (I use 1/8) Best part is- About $40 bucks for a windshield. All you need is your old windshield for a form for a new one.

If you go that route, go buy a detail saw at Menard's. That saw cuts at variable speed, and the plastic will not weld itself behind the cut. Uses coping saw blades.

More info please...

How do you get the shield to form the bend that the original has?

Do you have a link to the saw? Never heard of Menard's.

And PICS! Without pics we must assume it didn't really happen.
 

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If you go that route, go buy a detail saw at Menard's. That saw cuts at variable speed, and the plastic will not weld itself behind the cut. Uses coping saw blades.

how is that any better than a fine tooth blade on a Jig Saw?
I have two of those things, and both of them are Variable Speed.

I need to cut 2 inches off of my Optic Armor windshield, so it will fit inside the toy hauler.
 

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I cut some off mine,(like be able to see over mine),I cut it with my Ryobi variable speed jig saw,had to dress up the edge but it worked good,tape the windshield and the saw foot for easy movement.
 

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You can also take a piece of Lexan/polycarbonate and bend it in a brake. Another useless piece of information......take a 1/4" piece of polycarb and try shooting thru it with a .22 long rifle cartridge. Chances are pretty good the bullet will not go thru! Lexan is pretty cool stuff!
 

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I use 1/8 inch Lexan. It conforms to the bend of the windshield easily. Just cut it to size, and screw it on.

That detail saw is variable speed, and it was cheaper that most variable speed saber saws. Besides, I found it useful for cutting profiles on wood trim.

Also, I figured out how to clean up the edges after sawing. A flap wheel for a 4 inch grinder. Then emory cloth to work out the sander marks. Then polish the edges with Comet. One factory looking edge! A few riding buddies I have thought I bought a new windshield.

Cheapass me? No WAY!
 
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