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Hi All

I am currently riding and very happy with my 86 Aspy, but as we begin taking longer trips the wife and I are ready to move up to a 1500

I am looking at a 88 1500 now decent miles good condition and has been with same owner for quite a few years.

so my questions are

is doing the timing belts about the same as on the 1200 other than more plastic to remove

also if needed is the frontprogressivespring upgrade about the same as far as work



are there any other things I should really look for

I know we all have our own opinions so I welcome all thoughts but would especially like to here from those that have the older 1500 models
 

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I am all ears on this too. Christine and I are on the lookout for a 1500 as well.



AJ1200 beat me to the question.



Tim.



:thumbsup:
 

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There are trade-offs; Less carb.s that are easier to work on, but harder to R/R. More plastic to remove to get at the belts, but no radiator in the way either. The ride is better, but the mileage is worse.

I like my 1500.


Bill
 

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I actually think it's easier to change the timing belts on a 1500. Maybe it's just me, but I had to remove the radiator to replace the timing belts on my 1200, but not so on the 1500.

I am not familiar with the spring upgrade, as I haven't done that on either bike yet.

I don't think you will regret moving up to the 1500. JMHO

[/quote]
 

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I bought a 93 aspencade four years ago,with 48000 miles on the clock,

shortly afterward one ofthe brushes went. so i replaced it with a compu fire,

no problems to date changed the oil in the front standard shocks at 76000

miles, old oil was metallic looking, replaced timing belts at 50000 miles,

Istalled ak&n air filter back in04/03/09 bike did not like it,went back to hond oem filter purring like a cat now synchronized the carbs at 71000 miles, slightly out of

sync. no problems todate. very happy with this bike.
 

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It's been a long while since I've changed 1200 belts but I would say that the 1500 belts are much easier to work on. That doesn't mean it's less time - there's lots of plastic to come off but there is more room to see what you're doing and less skinning of knuckles.



I think you'll find almost everything on the 1500 is easier to work on. I'm on my second 1500 and not looked back.
 

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that's what I'm talking about
I didn't know the radiator wouldn't be in the way for doing the timing belts
the bike has around 71K has been maintained well but belts haven't been replaced, this would be the first thing I would want to do
it has new tires and recent oil change, not sure on the forks yet.
hmm less carbs, does this mean the 1500 only has 2 carbs rather than the 4 on the 1200
I feel pretty sure I won't regret the move, I just want to make the right move the first time
 

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AJ1200 wrote:
that's what I'm talking about
I didn't know the radiator wouldn't be in the way for doing the timing belts
the bike has around 71K has been maintained well but belts haven't been replaced, this would be the first thing I would want to do
it has new tires and recent oil change, not sure on the forks yet.
hmm less carbs, does this mean the 1500 only has 2 carbs rather than the 4 on the 1200
I feel pretty sure I won't regret the move, I just want to make the right move the first time

The 1500 only has two carbs and as I'm sure you know, 71k is nothing for a Wing. I bought my '95 1500 back in January of this year with 76k miles.



I changed the belts, coolant, rear drive oil and crankcase oil. I replaced the tires and lubed the rear drive splines.



I then rode it from Virginia up to New York/Vermont for the Americade in June for a short test/verfication of its roadworthiness. Ieven climbed Mt. Washington with it while I was in New Hampshire.



After which, I rode it from Virginia to California and back in August and the bike performed flawlessly.
 

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1500 has 2 carbs easy to sync, plastics over plugs has to come off toget at belts,

time to replace belts is around one hour.
 

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I've done belts on both the 1200 and the 1500. They are very similar but not having to remove the radiators does make the 1500 easier.
 

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I have an 88 1500 , bought it with 44750 on the clock about 18 or 19 months ago . It now has 72000 plus on it .
I put in the progressive front springs and opted for the heavier weight oil ( I like a stiffer ride ) It made a world of difference in the bike. I have changed the plugs 2 times at about 50 000 and about 500 miles ago.

Went to the darkside with the rear tire and will never run another MC tire again on the rear. Have changed the front and rear brake pads. When U get yours it would be a good idea to go through the brakes front and rear and clean everything up, Not doing it ruined a 4 day ride last year, the brakes were not releasing and ruined the pads. I should have reworked them even though they worked good when I checked them.
Over all I love the 1500, I had a 1100 in the early 80's and it was a good bike ,but the 1500 far out shadows it .
I have had oppertunities to ride a couple of 1800's but turned them down, I fear that if I rode 1 I would be looking again.As it stands I am hoping the 1500 will be my last bike . There are a lot I would like to have , but I don't need anything else
 

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I did the progressive springs in front of my 1100 easy enough . Havnet done the 1500 but it needs them . there are several tutorials here to help and show some home built tools for this job .Heres one :DIY spring compressor tool - Goldwing Technical Forum - Forums - Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums

but there are some other ideas as well .



For me the hardest part of the 1500 is EVERYTHING is buried under the beautiful plastic skin :ROFL:, the first time its a little tricky taking it apart.



Miles ? who cares . Our 94 has over 182K and runs fine . Fuel milage for me is just at 40 though If I get wrist happy it can be lower.



You didnt mention pricing . Look around though and you might even move up a couple years for very little more chinga . 88/89 do have just a couple things that are interchangable with 90 up . I know the rear wheel and drive flange is one .



If your out on the open road you'll be happy with a 6 pack under the seat .:action:
 

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giturgun wrote:
I have had oppertunities to ride a couple of 1800's but turned them down, I fear that if I rode 1 I would be looking again.As it stands I am hoping the 1500 will be my last bike . There are a lot I would like to have , but I don't need anything else
Do not fear. If you really like the 1500 the 1800 doesn't hold that much power over you.

I had the same fear, and I rode the 1800 anyway. It seems that I am a real 1500 fan. I rode the 1800 and it didn't do anything for me. I liked it just fine, but it didn't cause me any undue desire to leave my 1500.
 

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I like the 95 to 2000 years the best, especially a SE model.
I have owned 95, 99 and now 2000. But that is just my opinion.
 

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Just replacing the front springs is a piece of cake, remove caps and out they come. Replace your fork oil.

Do all your filters. Air,oil, fuel, sub, cruise and compressor. R&R final drive gear oil. Lube speedo cable. Moly your drive splines and driveshaft. Check wheel bearings and lube axles. Service battery and test charging system. Change spark plugs. Service coolant. Spray your switches. Service brake and clutch fluids. Give everything else a look see.

Almost forgot, check the tire valve stems.

Add gas. And go and go and go and go :jumper:

JD
 

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77Pinto wrote:
There are trade-offs; Less carb.s that are easier to work on, but harder to R/R. More plastic to remove to get at the belts, but no radiator in the way either. The ride is better, but the mileage is worse.

I like my 1500.


Bill
OK, now I"m curious. What is the average gas mileage on a 1500?
 

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Okay so I just picked up a 90 1500 to go with my 79 1000 and 80 1100. The bike is a tank she is realy huge compared to the older wings. Handling is nowhere near as good. On the bright side went to walmart tonite and she swallowed all my purchases and had room to spare.
Don't like the heal and toe shifter. like the running boards. Not shure if it is a stock windshield but is way over my head!!!!!
Not shure if I will keep this one I really love my 1000 with vetter fairing and interstate bags, that bike really rock's. But I will ride the 1500 some then go back and see if the 1000 realy rock's or not
Wilf
 

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If you are not into nostalgia, the 1500 is a great bike. My boss used to have a '93 SE, and the transmission went out in it at around 60,000 miles, but he was very hard on it. He has always ridden bikes like he stole them. He's had 2 accidents since I've known him, luckily only minor injuries, especially because he doesn't wear a helmet most of the time. I have ridden it several times and like it. I liked it better than the 1800 he has now. Something about that bike just doesn't feel right.

As for me, I have a 1200, and would like to trade for an 1100, but then I am into vintage vehicles, and think the 1100 is the best looking Goldwing ever made, and more motorcycle like than any of the later models.

When I buy any used bike, I go through the service schedule in the owners manual or service manual, and do EVERTYHING, including the big stuff, like pulling the rear end apart and doing the splines (I've seen a LOT of perfectly good bikes ruined just because of that one thing) and on the Goldwing, replacing the belts. Remove, disassemble and clean the carbs, it will save you some trouble down the road.

If the bike has a heel and toe shifter, I sure hope there is some way to get rid of that. My 1200 came with that, and floorboards, and it was awful. I thought it was stock, and that I had made a serious mistake buying it. A few inquiries, and I found out it was aftermarket, and could be replaced with stock pegs, shifter, and brake pedal, and 3 days later I had swapped them out. Absolutely amazing difference. This big bike now shifts so much better, and handles like a bike half it''s size.
 
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