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A master cylinder for my 1979 gl1000 is no longer made and used parts will probably not be much better than what I have not. Boring out the plunger cylinder makes operation ofthe rubber plunger iffy. Is there a way to recoat the inside of the plunger cylinder to seal up any pits in the bore?
 

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I doubt it. Only cure I know of from being involved with older classic car clubs is to have an insert/ sleeve made to sit inside the original after slight boreout.
 

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Ole Guy
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This is a maybe solution. I have used JB Weld on a pitted power steering shaft and on my pitted front fork tube on my 1985 GL1200.



Clean the parts with a strong solvent to clean away oil. Let it soak over night. Let it dry completely.Apply JB Weld or product of your choice.Apply thin, so there is not a bunch to remove. Work down the majorty with wet dry sand paper. I'd go no coarser than 400 at first, then finer, then hone.



I do not know if brake fluide will remove the epoxy material,but it is worth a try as the worst it can do is leak again. Ifit holds, you will have saved your master cylinder.



My front tube is doingwell after four years, but folk oil is not as harsh as brake fluid. Brake fuild removes paint, but JB is not paint.



I have used JB on many projects after hearingmany positive comments andno negative comments.



Can anyone else add to this?



Ole Guy
 

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I thought there must be something that would work. I have not found anyone yet that can put a little sleeve in my master cylinder. Like you said, try it and see what happens. It's not a major deal to recoat the cylinder once a year. If it works I know a lot of people who would be interested in using this technique. I'm also going to talk to some brake experts who might have a box of little rubber piston plungers? to see if I could find one a tiny bit larger than the original that I could use, and then hone the cylinder a tiny bit. I just want ot make sure that when I hit the brakes - they work!
 

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Ole Guy
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Change your fluid every two years to remove the corrosive moisture and the pitting may take longer than your life time. Brake fluid, especially DOT 3 sucks up moisture. With time moisture may actually seeps in through the rubber and metal parts, even though it is not suppose too. That is one reason to change your fluid reguarly. We are riding bikes these days for ever and forget regular maintenance is a must for trouble free riding.

Change your anti freeze regularly too. When the anti corrosive properties wear out, it is your head gasket the is dissloving.
 

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The 79 front master cylinder was I believe a single year application so it is not surprizing that it is no longer available.

I would get a good used 78 and rebuild that. It seems like they are much more common. Or you can switch to a Nissin 5/8 Master like the one Randakk sells. I have one on my 78 and combined with SS braid lines it was a HUGE improvement over the stock system.
 

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I traded a chipper/shredder and an acetylene torch for this bike. It's a fixer-upper. The tag on the back says 2004. I think I'll be fixin and cleanin for a while. Thanks for you help.
 

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I sent an email to JB weld and asked them if brake fluid would hurt their product and they said "no".
 

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Ole Guy
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The JB Weld company advises "DO NOT" use alcohol to clean surfaces. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JB_Weld . Alcohol is used to clean break parts. Clean the surface with something other than alcohol. After the epoxy sets, you can clean up with alcohol. This stuff get hard so apply it thin so there is little to remove. Consider a practise run on a test object.

Ole Guy
 

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Thanks for the reply.



I never thought of using alcohol to clean car or bike parts. I have used that in the past to clean computer equipment though because it cleans a little and dries quickly without leaving a residue. I have cans of carburetor cleaner, carburetor soaking liquid, pb blaster, and gasoline for cleaning. For these brake parts I will use carburetor cleaner and give a good wipedown after that.
 
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