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Hi all................... have a 2006 Honda Metropolitan moped and it seems to have changed and is very cold blooded................ Not sure what has changed .............. late last fall right befor I put it away for the season I put Seafoam in the tank and it started to run like crap. Took it to a Honda shop for a tune up and they took the carb off and cleaned the jet and that seemed to fix it until it has started to get cooler in temps. Now that it's cooler I have to wait a bit befor attempting to open the throttle any or it dies completely. Feather the throttle a tiny bit and it dies. Wait a minute and away it will go. Just wondering if anyone has ever dealt with these things ??

Paul
 

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I had one for 2 years, put over 8,000 miles on it. BTW, it is a scooter, not a moped. I have a moped too, a 1977 Puch, 50cc with pedals, that I toured all over the southwestern U.S. and a good part of Sonora Mexico on back when I was a lot younger. I bought it new, and it now has over 20,000 miles on it, put on there at 30 mph or less.

Back to the Metropolitan. I never had any problem with mine, except the top speed of 40 mph, But many have had issues with the electric choke, also called a bystarter. A good place to go for information on these is urbanscootin.com. It is an entire forum dedicated to the Metropolitan.

I like scooters, and still have 2, a stock '08 Yamaha Vino 125, and a built from the ground up '71 Vespa PX150. 2 stroke, manual shift and clutch, premix gas, and kickstart only. Talk about a blast to ride.
 

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Other than the loss of compression the most common 'won't start when cold' cause is the by-starter (like JerryH said)

It's a plunger with a needle on the end. You can remove it from the carb and test it. It's got 2 wires attached to it. Unplug the wires, remove the small philips screw from the C-shaped clamp and wiggle out the by-starter. Measure the distance from the bottom of the by-starter plunger to the base of the by-starter. Hook up the 2 wires to a known good battery. Remember that a green wire is ground. The other wire would be positive. Leave it set for about 5 minutes and then re-measure the distance. There should be about 1/4" difference. If the plunger doesn't move then the by-starter is bad.
 

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A moped has bicycle pedals and can be powered solely by the pedals without the use of the engine.

Those electric chokes are not the best and often fail.
 

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Back when the Honda Express came out it was more like a moped but less like a scooter or motorcycle. We dubbed it the 'No-Ped'…. and it seemed to stick.

From then on anything that didn't fit the basic description was a 'no-ped'.
 

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Here in AZ, there is a huge legal difference between mopeds and nopeds, like the Honda Express, Yamaha QT50, Suzuki FA50, etc. Mopeds only require a drivers license, and may be ridden in bicycle lanes (at speeds of no more than 20 mph). They have a unique plate that says MOPED right on it. The require a registration and insurance and registration, but have no title.

Nopeds (and Tomos currently sells both mopeds and nopeds in the U.S.) are considered motorcycles, even though they are still 49cc, because of their lack of pedals. They require a motorcycle endorsement, have a title, and cannot be ridden in bike lanes, so they are practically worthless. I mean, try to ride a bike with a 30 mph top speed in traffic and see how long you survive.

Scooters of any size are a whole different thing. All scooters are considered motorcycles in AZ, and have the same requirements as nopeds. But there is a big difference in the vehicles themselves, with a few exceptions. Most scooters have full bodywork and small wheels, and look similar to the Metropolitan. Some like the Honda Ruckus, have no bodywork, but still have small wheels. A number of manufacturers, including Piaggio and Kymco, have started making scooters with larger diameter wheels. And those big ugly things like the Honda Silverwing and Suzuki Bergman 650 are also scooters, though they are not my idea of a scooter. My '71 Vespa PX150 fits my idea of what a scooter should be perfectly.
 

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unionjk wrote:
A moped has bicycle pedals and can be powered solely by the pedals without the use of the engine.....
depends on what state you are in.... here in S.C. everything up to about 75??cc is called a moped (It actually has a state issued tag that says MOPED in big bold letters.. no numbers)
 
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