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philcsand wrote:
I would say that you shouldn't even think about trying to talk on a cell while riding. It's dangerous enough out there without them.
Now, they have found that hands-free is still very dangerous:
The message is clear: Keep your cell phone in your pocket, on your belt or in the seat beside you while you're driving, and if you just can't wait to make a call, pull over, stop and lessen the danger to yourself -- and other drivers.
I gotta agree 100% with you on that one Phil! If I want to receive calls on my cell phone, I put the thing in an inside pocket in my jacket. There's no doubt when it rings, the vibration feels like a heart attack. I don't answer it, just pull over when it's convenient and check the message or look up the missed call and call it. Most of the time you can find a safe place to pull over within a very few minutes so it's not likely your caller would be unavailable. Most of the time I carry the damn thing in the trunk turned off.
 

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Wingdo, another place to try for jackplug adaptors is foneplanet; just put into your search engine.

The debate on phone usage whilst riding is interesting and important. Clearly, any distraction from driving is not desirable, but as a useful toolthe handsfree phone can have a place (albeit a small place) in the riding experience. Deep and meaningful telephonicular(!) discussionsshould not be part of this experience but brief messages should not go amiss. In any case, although the phone self-answers, it can always be ignored until the caller switches off.

As something of an aside, how does phone useage compare with, for example, listening to very loud music through a headset, which tends to restrict the hearing of the engine of another vehicle coming up, notwithstanding the use of mirrors. Or, what about having a conversation, or even a heated argument with a passenger ( heard such when someone inadvertently left their talk-button open).

Worse still, I know of two riders who were rehearsing some sort of masonic ceremonial speech over the cb; nobody else was remotely interested so they had to be told to button it. Other riders, over the cb, insist on giving the rest of us the benefit of their knowledge and expertise by giving a commentary on points of interest throughout the journey. Personally, I have enough trouble coping with keeping right side up and avoiding anti-bikers to pay any attention to distant monuments etc.

I think proportion (sense of)is the watchword but if one is not comfortable with it, don't do it: this can apply to lots of things, not necessarily to do with biking.
 

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colbee wrote:
As something of an aside, how does phone useage compare with, for example, listening to very loud music through a headset,
There have been several studies in the UK and US that indicate that it's not the actual fiddling with the phone that causes the distraction, it's the mental engagement with the conversation that causes the problem. Loud music doesn't cause as much disconnect with what you're currently doing. I do appreciate those who blast their ear drums with loud music in a headset, they represent a good portion of deafness seekers who don't blast it out for all of us to suffer.
 
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