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Hey all...



Just got my first bike - 85 Aspencade. Very fun to ride so far.



I've done a little research on this board and have some questions that are related to the bad connector on the alternator circuit (sorry to beat this horse):



1. Is it absolutely critical that I remove the connector and solder the wires together? Why solder - could I use in-line barrels and a crimp-type splices? Or could I find another three pin connector?



2.This may seem like a dumb question, but are LEDs equivalent to HID lights? Or would it be more appropriate to say that HID lights are implemented using LEDs? I am interestedin replacing the lamps with LEDs and would like to get the most effective lights possible.



3. My neighbor suggested I add some auxiliary lights on either side of the forks. Does anyone here have a similar mod? I've tried googling "fork-mounted lights" and get information overload. I'm kind of looking for some help down the right path. Any suggestions for possible fixtures, etc?



4. Finally, I noticed of the paint peeling off of the fairing. Since I'm not a huge fan of the light blue look, I was thinking about getting it re-painted during the off-season, but I'm not sure how much work it will be to pull of all the plastics, cost, etc. Has anyone here had their bike painited?



Thanks. Looking forward to reading and posting here.



- Pete
 

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As far as the connector, you can do what you wish...but my first 85 Interstate had issues. The previous owner not only removed the 3 wire connector, but he then cut the wires and used wire nuts!:X The result was a fried stator. :doh:



Step one of replacing the stator.....remove motor!:headbanger: Your call.



I am going to install the Poorboy alternator kit as soon as I can find the crankshaft pulley. The one that I purchased from a local vendor was the wrong belt size.:blushing:



For a piece of mind...solder the connector. It will save you trouble later on. In addition, install a digital voltmeter to monitor the stator. It can save you a long walk later on.:hovering:



Good luck!
 

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Solder is really the only connection that will not overheat and lose continuity, crimp splices are for temporary repairs.

HIDs and LEDs are 2 completely different things, LED meaning light emitting diode, HID meaning high intensity discharge.
LEDs for tail, marker, turn and brake lights significantly reduce the electrical load so that you can add other things like driving lights.
HIDs are for headlights only and also will reduce the electrical load while providing a lot more light.
There is a downside to reducing the load on these old bikes with the internal stator and external regulator though. Since the stator is under full load all the time and the regulator turns the excess current into heat the reg will get hotter if the load is significantly reduced.
 

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Just did a re-paint this past winter on my GL1100. I did a current car color with Ghost flaming on tank, side covers and front fender. Also removed a few of the emblems. I did the fairing in solid, no flames and painted it myself with base coat, clearcoat. Are you going to do the paint yourself or have it done. My painter charged $800 for what he did and then I had another $150 in materal to finish the solid panels.
 

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DaveO430 wrote
There is a downside to reducing the load on these old bikes with the internal stator and external regulator though. Since the stator is under full load all the time and the regulator turns the excess current into heat the reg will get hotter if the load is significantly reduced.
That's an interesting concept that I had not thought about. Wonder what the temp/heat threshold is for the regulator and if anyone out there with LED conversions has had any regulator issues after the switch.

As far as the 3 yellow wires are concerned....solder is the only way to go.
 

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So what is the issue with the connector? Is it just undersized? The wrong design?

Interesting take on the use of crimp splices...I work in an industrial environment where we prefer crimped connections to solder - too many cold solder joints!
 

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Forgot this from the first post...

Thanks for the responses.

As far as the paint is concerned, I would probably do all the dis-assembly myself and have a friend do the painting.
 

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pstelter wrote:
So what is the issue with the connector? Is it just undersized? The wrong design?

Interesting take on the use of crimp splices...I work in an industrial environment where we prefer crimped connections to solder - too many cold solder joints!
The issue with the connector is mostly age, if you could replace it with as good of connections as it was when new it would probably last another 20 or so years.
Yes cold solder joints are as bad as any other bad connection.
 

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If friend is going to squirt the paint for you, Materials should cost you approx $250 - 300------depending on if you redo the factory decals ect. Key is prep, prep, prep!!!
 

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All good advice... Just painted mine few months ago... It IS a lot of work tearing apart

Prep work very important as namsgt stated... Be sure to pull radiator & check condition of hoses & timing belts if you do not know that they have been changed...

Took me a few weeks to re-assemble as I was doing maintenence while she was tore apart.. Well worth the effort... Ride with confidence :action:
 

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The problem with the connector is the corrosion that occurs and you end up with bad connections and the connectors start to burn and over heat due to the resistance caused by the corrosion. This also causes the stator to over heat (not sure if it is no load on the stator or too much load with the resistance)and burn out. If your connector is till good you can try filling the connector with dielectric grease to keep corrosion under control.

I've heard two schools on solder and crimp connectors. The idea of vibration causing cold solder joints probably has merit when dealing with PC boards. Also some believe that the soldered connector will cause the wire to break just before the solder joint. But crimp on connectors that may be out in the elements can corrode and cause loss of connection. Getting good crimps can some times be problematic and cause the crimp to come apart with vibration. Since the stator wires can be out in the environment (i.e. rain or water when washing) I would chose to solder them as I think there would be less worry about the strain on the join compared to corrosion in the crimp.

I assume your neighbor was talking about fork mounted lights like driving lights or fog lights? If so there is a light bar that attaches just under the front of the fairing. Or mount a couple of lights on the engine guards. But, the Goldwing stator isn't up to putting out a lot of watts and you can over tax the stator and burn it out. Do some looking on the site for auxiliary lights or driving lights and you will find quite a few discussions on how folks did theirs. You can change out all the running and turn signal lights to LED lights to reduce the wattage used by those so you can use extra lighting. Or go with the Poor Boy alternator setup which gives you more wattage to work with.
 

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For a GL-1200, many people use $30 rectangular driving lights or such, and mount them on the crash bars, in front of the cam belt covers.

The result is the same - without the inconvenience of fork-mount.
 
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