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Man, now that is nice!! looks better and more stable than the Harbor Freight lifts.
 

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Those are nice. I bet they're a bit pricier than Harbor Freight! I can only dream, as the only m/c lift I have is the center stand!!!!! :)
 

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Yes $900.00 with all the extra's,rear extention,side wings etc. delivered to Parker AZ.
 

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For the extra security, that would be worth it to me. A place to lay your tools and test equipment while it is up at waist height working on it? Nice.
 

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They are worth every penny of what you have to pay for them. If you check out my link in my signature, I built my own. I was lucky enough to have the hydraulics laying around, and most of the steel, so I have less than 150.00 bucks tied up in mine. Since I did the video, I have since replaced the wooden deck with diamond plate, now it looks really cool!

The point is, they are fantastic, even for little things. I put my lawn mower on mine to change the blades or whatever else maintenance needs to be done. I have used it to work on ATV's for folks, I even it use it for a work table at times.

Since mine is recessed into the floor, it also comes in handy when I need to lift something heavy into my truck, I slide it up on the lift, raise the lift to the correct height, back my truck up to the lift and slide the load into the truck.

Oh, and I also made two 12 inch wide extensions (one for each side).
 

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Sonny in Indiana That lift is way to cool. See That is what makes this site so useful. Thanks for sharing this with everyone.
 

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Jetmek wrote:
Yes $900.00 with all the extra's,rear extention,side wings etc. delivered to Parker AZ.
Thanks.I knew it would be out of my price range, so I didn't want to bother them putting together a quote. And besides, once you do that, you are on the salesman's mailing list.

But I was curious, because it looks to be a really nice lift, and it would be nice to have a goal.

Right now I havethe basic modelHarbor Freight table lift, and it meets my needs, but I expect that one day I will want something more.

;)
 

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Jetmek wrote:
Sonny in Indiana That lift is way to cool.

I agree. That one is really sweet.



Sonny, you might only have $150 in it, but it's gotta be worth 10 times that.

Did you chip out the concrete in the floor? I wonder what it would take to put my lift into the floor.
 

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That lift of Sonny's is great! He sent me the pictures of it when I was looking for a lift last spring. For some reason when I asked him to put one in for me, I didn't hear back!!:D:cooldevil::D:cooldevil::D I did end up finding a Direct-Lift on Craigslist about 50 miles from me for an asking price around $500, which looks similar to the one you were looking at. My lift will lift 1200lbs, but it does not have the drop tail. For maintainence, repair and cleaning a Wing, you can't beat a good table lift!!
 

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Wolfman wrote:
Jetmek wrote:
Sonny in Indiana That lift is way to cool.

I agree. That one is really sweet.



Sonny, you might only have $150 in it, but it's gotta be worth 10 times that.

Did you chip out the concrete in the floor? I wonder what it would take to put my lift into the floor.
Thanks guys, I appreciate the Kudo's.

OK........here is the long version of how the lift came to be recessed in the floor........

in early spring of 08' I had contacted a company right here in Indiana that makes an awesome motorcycle lift. It was only 500.00 and about 125 miles from me, so I was going to take a trailer and go pick one up as soon as I saved enough safety chrome money.

Late last August, I called to order one, and the price had risen to 899.00 as of July 1st. I was bummin. My dad was a heavy equipment mechanic for 30 plus years, when he died about 11 years ago, I sold most of his big tools, but kept all of the small tools that I could ever use. He also had all kinds of hydraulic rams, and port-a-power units. I through all of those under a corner of the work bench in my garage and never gave them a second thought.

When I decided that I could not afford the nice lift, I was looking at how the Harbor Freight unit was designed, and got the idea to tinker around. I dug out the ram that I eventually used, and took it to a man that I know who rebuilds units. He told me how to rebuild it, sold me the kit for 65.00 and when I growled at the price of the kit, he explained that the ram was a 50 ton ram that would cost aver 1600 dollars new.

I had to buy some heavy wall 2 inch square tubing for the legs which cost me about 100.00, the rest of the metal I had laying around.

When I first built it, it was about 12 inches tall collapsed, and I built a cool ramp to ride the bike up on. I used it like that for about a month, and I soon realized that if I was not using it, it was in the way. I experimented with rollers to move it to the side. But, it just took up to much room.

Now, about the garage floor.............. When I built my garage, I built it over an old pond that had been drained. As you are looking at the lift, the far right side corner of the garage floor is actually 14 feet off of the ground. When you first enter my garage, I have concrete for the first 16 feet on the left side, and the first 8 feet on the right side. Then the rest of the floor is 3/4 tongue & groove, sitting on top of 2 X 10's that sit on 7X9 Oak beams 4 feet apart. The beams are supported by concrete pillars. So even though the floor is wooden, I can and have parked 3 full size vehicles and my Ford Jubilee tractor in the garage at one time.


So, to recess the lift, I cut the hole in the floor between two of the 7X9 beams, and built the little basement to set the lift in. I had to replace the 4 legs with ones that were 12 inches longer to make up for dropping it in the "basement". (the original legs were 3 feet long, and collapsed it was 12 inches high, so in essence, it had 24 inces of true lift. I replaced those legs with 48 inch legs, so now it has 36 inches of true lift) Long answer to a short question, I know............

Now that it has diamond plate metal and painted gloss black, it almost looks professionally made! It works so cool, and I have used it literally hundreds if not thousands of times. It is so solid, that when I am lifting my own Wing, I just throw it up on the center stand and raise it in the air with out tying it down in any fashion. When I lift other peoples bikes, I tie them down just to make them feel better, but the thing is rock solid! Oh, one other thing, I welded some 1/2 inch nuts underneath in strategic locations, drilled holes in the diamond plate accordingly, I have 2 inch eyebolts that thread into the nuts, to use as anchor points for tying bikes to the lift.
 

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Bagmaster wrote:
Man, now that is nice!! looks better and more stable than the Harbor Freight lifts.
Eat your heart out Baggie.



:shock: Looks a lot like this one :action:
 

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Sonny in Indiana wrote:
Wolfman wrote:
Jetmek wrote:
Sonny in Indiana That lift is way to cool.

I agree. That one is really sweet.



Sonny, you might only have $150 in it, but it's gotta be worth 10 times that.

Did you chip out the concrete in the floor? I wonder what it would take to put my lift into the floor.
Thanks guys, I appreciate the Kudo's.

OK........here is the long version of how the lift came to be recessed in the floor........

in early spring of 08' I had contacted a company right here in Indiana that makes an awesome motorcycle lift. It was only 500.00 and about 125 miles from me, so I was going to take a trailer and go pick one up as soon as I saved enough safety chrome money.

Late last August, I called to order one, and the price had risen to 899.00 as of July 1st. I was bummin. My dad was a heavy equipment mechanic for 30 plus years, when he died about 11 years ago, I sold most of his big tools, but kept all of the small tools that I could ever use. He also had all kinds of hydraulic rams, and port-a-power units. I through all of those under a corner of the work bench in my garage and never gave them a second thought.

When I decided that I could not afford the nice lift, I was looking at how the Harbor Freight unit was designed, and got the idea to tinker around. I dug out the ram that I eventually used, and took it to a man that I know who rebuilds units. He told me how to rebuild it, sold me the kit for 65.00 and when I growled at the price of the kit, he explained that the ram was a 50 ton ram that would cost aver 1600 dollars new.

I had to buy some heavy wall 2 inch square tubing for the legs which cost me about 100.00, the rest of the metal I had laying around.

When I first built it, it was about 12 inches tall collapsed, and I built a cool ramp to ride the bike up on. I used it like that for about a month, and I soon realized that if I was not using it, it was in the way. I experimented with rollers to move it to the side. But, it just took up to much room.

Now, about the garage floor.............. When I built my garage, I built it over an old pond that had been drained. As you are looking at the lift, the far right side corner of the garage floor is actually 14 feet off of the ground. When you first enter my garage, I have concrete for the first 16 feet on the left side, and the first 8 feet on the right side. Then the rest of the floor is 3/4 tongue & groove, sitting on top of 2 X 10's that sit on 7X9 Oak beams 4 feet apart. The beams are supported by concrete pillars. So even though the floor is wooden, I can and have parked 3 full size vehicles and my Ford Jubilee tractor in the garage at one time.


So, to recess the lift, I cut the hole in the floor between two of the 7X9 beams, and built the little basement to set the lift in. I had to replace the 4 legs with ones that were 12 inches longer to make up for dropping it in the "basement". (the original legs were 3 feet long, and collapsed it was 12 inches high, so in essence, it had 24 inces of true lift. I replaced those legs with 48 inch legs, so now it has 36 inches of true lift) Long answer to a short question, I know............

Now that it has diamond plate metal and painted gloss black, it almost looks professionally made! It works so cool, and I have used it literally hundreds if not thousands of times. It is so solid, that when I am lifting my own Wing, I just throw it up on the center stand and raise it in the air with out tying it down in any fashion. When I lift other peoples bikes, I tie them down just to make them feel better, but the thing is rock solid! Oh, one other thing, I welded some 1/2 inch nuts underneath in strategic locations, drilled holes in the diamond plate accordingly, I have 2 inch eyebolts that thread into the nuts, to use as anchor points for tying bikes to the lift.
ive always liked your lift Sonny. I built the afab myself and have considered cutting out the floor to recess it so I can walk over it when not in use and make it easier to load and unload. Can you clue me in on your remote controls. Thanks JB
 

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I received a quote this morning for the 1000 pound capacity lift with extensions and wheel vise: $ 979.00 delivered to the west coast of California. They didn't send a quote on the 1500 pound capacity model.
 

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Sonny that is one sweet lift......................
 

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Ok so I have a question on these lifts. I do see how they get things up to eye level and make it easier to work on, but how do they help with tire removal. I would assume you still need a jack? Everything else I don't mind laying on the floor to do.
 

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bbach wrote:
Ok so I have a question on these lifts. I do see how they get things up to eye level and make it easier to work on, but how do they help with tire removal. I would assume you still need a jack? Everything else I don't mind laying on the floor to do.
This is my Harborfreight lift. It's the low end model.

Out of the crate, it isn't long enough for a Goldwing to use the removable panel. But I did a simple modification and I can remove the plate. I show it on my webpage.

With the bike in the air, the plate comes out and the wheel can drop out through the hole.

http://www.hrot.org/martino/goldwing/lift/index.htm
 

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bbach wrote:
Ok so I have a question on these lifts. I do see how they get things up to eye level and make it easier to work on, but how do they help with tire removal. I would assume you still need a jack? Everything else I don't mind laying on the floor to do.
watch the video on my lift. I built the rear in a "U" shape. As mentioned above, set the bike on the center stand, slide the rear panel out and the tire just drops down out of the way.


JBz: I have a 10,000 psi electric pump to power the ram. I have a long cable with a toggle switch. When I push the switch forward (for up) it engages the electric motor. When you release the toggle, it is "center off". When I pull the toggle back for down, it trips a small electro-magnetic switch that opens the bleed off vavle in the pump and allows the fluid to drain back into the tank, which in turn allows the lift to lower.


The lift for the safety legs is a lot more creative......... I took a small hydraulic cylinder and piped air to it. (every few weeks I squirt a little oil into it for lubrication)

To trigger the air, I used a solenoid out of a dishwasher. (the one the lets water into the washer). A regulator reduces the pressure coming from the supply line (from 150 psi down to 27 psi). I placed a push button switch on the control box that has the toggle for the up and down on th electric pump, when I push the button, it triggers the dishwasher solonoid, which allows air into the cylinder that lifts the safety legs out of the way.

This might sound kind of confusing, but between the dishwasher solonoid, and the cylinder, I put a t in the line, with a small valve, that is opended slightly. Before I placed the valve in the line, when I would shoot air to the cylinder, the legs would lift out of the way, and then stay there :(

So, I installed the valve, and opened it slightly (through trial and error) until it held the legs for the desired few seconds, and then the cylinder will bleed down, dropping the safety legs back into place.

If you are interested, I can take some close up photos and post them. I need to do a new video anyway to "show off" what the lift looks like now with the diamond plate deck material. :)
 
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