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I bought a 1986 Goldwing I need to put a new tire on it. I already have the tire on a rim. I see it calls for moly 60 grease anyone have a substitute so I do not have to buy at a dealer? What else should I do for maintenance while the tire is off?
Thanks In Advance!!!
 

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Welcome to the forum spence5117

That's Moly 60 Paste, not grease. There is a difference in that you will get drips leaking down with grease.
Loctite makes a moly paste that I use. Comes in a 8 oz tub with a brush applicator. It's got an 85% Moly content rather than 60%. (Honda Moly 60 comes in 3oz tube, @ 1/3 of the tube is Moly paste, rather than a full tube of paste)
Be sure and pull the driveshaft out and lube the front splines and pull the rubber boot output bellows covering the ujoint and lube the output shaft splines too.
 

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When I called dealer to find Honda Moly 60 the guy said they didn't have any. I asked what they used and he said just a waterproof grease :shock:
I had some 50% moly grease that I used, no drips yet. However, I did locate Honda stuff at an independent shop so next tire change I'll use that.
 

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When I called dealer to find Honda Moly 60 the guy said they didn't have any. I asked what they used and he said just a waterproof grease :shock:
I had some 50% moly grease that I used, no drips yet. However, I did locate Honda stuff at an independent shop so next tire change I'll use that.
Keep your bike away from that dealers service department.
 

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I recommend either Honda Moly 60 (yes they will have to order it) or Guard Dog 570, which is what I use. You can order that online. There are a couple of others, but nothing you are going to find locally. These lubricants are not cheap, but are worth way more than they cost. The big difference between them and simple moly grease is the amount of moly in them. Moly grease is typically 3-4% moly. Honda Moly is 60% moly, GD570 is 73% moly. This stuff will save your final drive parts.

If you recently bought the bike, I recommend doing the ENTIRE final drive. Remove the final drive gearcase and drive shaft. Pull the driveshaft out of the gearcase. There is an oil seal on the end of the driveshaft that goes into the final drive gearcase that I would replace once you have it apart. Clean any old grease off both ends of the driveshaft, and coat the splines on both ends with moly paste.

Now pull back the rubber boot at the front of the swing arm, and pull the U-joint off the engine output shaft. Clean the splines on the U-joint and output shaft (I used spray brake parts cleaner with the straw) put moly paste on the U-joint splines and the output shaft splines. I can't remember if you can reach the rear splines on the U-joint or not, if not it's not a big deal. Put the U-joint back on the output shaft, leave the boot pulled back.


Now remove the plug from the final drive unit, and drain the oil out of it. Clean the splines on the back side of it. Now either remove the driven flange from the wheel to inspect the dampers, and clean the internal splines on it, the ones that mesh with the splines on the back of the final gearcase. Coat these with moly. I just worked it in with my finger until I could see it was about halfway through all the way around from the back. I also put some on the 5 pins that go into the metal bushings in the rear wheel.

If you are going to replace the grease seal on the gearcase end of the driveshaft, do that now. Insert the driveshaft back into the gearcase. There should be a clip on it that holds it in the gearcase. If it is missing it will work fine that way, but it is easier to assemble things if it is there. Now with the gearcase and driveshaft back together. insert the driveshaft back into the swingarm. This is the hardest part. You have to mesh the splines on the end of the driveshaft with the U-joint. If the U-joint is not badly worn, it should be stiff enough to stay where you put it. Fortunately the Goldwing has more room to work at the front of the swing arm than most bikes. You may need to hold the gearcase in one hand, while you get the driveshaft and U-joint lined up with the other. Once they are together, slide the gearcase all the way up against the swingarm, and put a couple of nuts on it to hold it. Put the rubber boot back in place, and install and tighten all 4 of the gearcase nuts. Now lube the splines on the back of the gearcase, and fill it back up with new gear oil. The wheel is ready to go back on.

Note: Real moly paste is messy. Either wear rubber gloves, or be prepared to use something pretty strong to get it off your hands. I use gasoline, but many don't like to do that. Kerosene or mineral spirits should work as well. Also be aware that if you have it on your hands it will get on anything you touch. The fact that it is so hard to get off is what makes it work so well.

If you are going to be doing much work on the bike I suggest getting a manual. The Goldwing is no harder to work on than any other bike, and easier than many. But it is often more time consuming due to all the plastic that must often be removed to get to things.
 

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Put the rubber boot back in place, and install and tighten all 4 of the gearcase nuts. Now lube the splines on the back of the gearcase, and fill it back up with new gear oil. The wheel is ready to go back on.
NO.
Install and torque the the axle nut after putting the wheel back in. The four bolts on the differential get tightened LAST.
 
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