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I just pulled out the fork tubes to have them rebuilt. I also rebuilt both of the anti-dive sleeve/boot assemblies because the rubber boots disintegrated when I disassembled the front end. When I removed the front brake calipers a small stainless(?) plate fell out of the assembly when I removed the caliper from the mounting bracket (both sides). I didn't think much about untill I re-installed the tubes, fenders, wheel and brakes last night.

There were no details in the manual about these small plates but after a bit of trial and error I seem to have figured out where they came from and the proper orientation. It looks like they are only held in by being trapped between the bracket and the caliper body. There is a notch in the plates that seems made to straddle the router.

Does anyone know the purpose of this plate and does it sound like I put it in the right spot? Its part #



45112-MB9-871
Retainer, FR. Bracket
from this site http://www.goldwinginfo.com/
 

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mjpliv wrote:
When I removed the front brake calipers a small stainless(?) plate fell out of the assembly when I removed the caliper from the mounting bracket (both sides).
It looks like they are only held in by being trapped between the bracket and the caliper body. There is a notch in the plates that seems made to straddle the router.

As best I recall thats where it goes, assuming its a Gl1200, I believe its an anti squeal plate. Good move to replace the rubbers in the TRAC while theyre still availiable!!:clapper::clapper:
 

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I believe it's used as a shim. Didn't even notice it while redoing my 1200's brakes, until I knocked it loose during reassembly.
 

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It's an anti-rattle clip. Don't know iuf it actually works, but at least you put it back in place properly.
 

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Yep, anti chatter/squeal plates. Probably not absolutely necessary unless your brakes start to make noise.
 

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If you look closely at the shims you should see two small lugs that locate in a reccess in the arm, they may need tweeking with a pair of pliers so they will clip in.:)
 

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Thanks all! It makes sense now that the anti-noise thing was mentioned because, given the nature of the calipers, there would be a fair amount of movement expected between its body and the mount.

Should there be some sort of lubricant on these plates or is it best to assemble them dry? Other than some spray silicon on the rubber parts I assembled the wholeworks dry.
 

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Dry. Lube can get on the brake pads. Theres a great deal of heat generated by the pads and it will soften grease and make it run. ive seen cycles with brake rotors covered in burnt grease from improper lube and its dangerous. best to consult a factory manual for greasing - see where factory put it. I usually put some only on pins that are sealed behind rubber seals.
 

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I have always thought that these stainless plates are there to act as protectors for the calipers. That's why I always make sure to get them back in place properly. Without them the steel backing plate of the brake pads will wear into the soft aluminum of the caliper, but, I could be wrong.

Vic
 

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You're on target GW84. The shims serve two purposes.. as you stated, to reduce side to side wear on the caliper and pistons AND to dissipate the heat generated during the braking process. If mother Honda didn't want them, they wouldn't have installed them... Got to do with CPV... (cost per vehicle). Anything related to safety, whether it's hardware or performance, should remain as the manufacturer intended.
 

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If one of the functions of these plates is to reduce wear, shouldn't there be some sort of lubricant used on it? I bought some high pressure lube to put between the pads and pistons (I read about that in another part of this forum somewhere but after Dave's warning I will think twice about using it there) and this should be far enough away from the pads to be safe to use.
 

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No lubricant needed on the spacer.. It's a dry fit and it does not perform an action to prevent movement. It's a sacrificial piece to preserve the moving parts of the caliper and retainers. Even I don't quite understand it, but it works.
 

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mjpliv wrote:
If one of the functions of these plates is to reduce wear, shouldn't there be some sort of lubricant used on it?

No, lubricant is used where metals slide past each other, theres no sliding to speak of, just pressure. Think - "grease might = no brakes someday...":shock:

Thats a good point about hard spacer, there should be no free play between piston and pad (?) it might be there to spread the load. i was just always into throwing parts that didnt make horsepower. Lightened the ol girl about 30 -50 pounds.

Whatever you do to modify it, especially brakes, sit and look at it a good long time and think about it.

Seem to recall that "retainer" had to do with holding the pads in for assembly, but that may be wrong.
 

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Hi all,

I've read over the posts here, and it seems that I'm reading about two different metal bits from folks.

Now, there's the one spring plate that rests inside the caliper that provides the "smooth interface" between the pad backs and the caliper and provides heat dissipation. There is also a metal clip that can fall off of the caliper mounting bracket when you remove the caliper.

This second piece is clipped to the flat spot near the top of the caliper mounting arm, and as far as I can figure, it provides a surface for the caliper to slide across without being damaged by the cast mounting arm. In a way, it serves the same purpose as the one inside the caliper that allows the pads to slide better.

Gurus - does this make sense? Either way, I'd put that spacer/shim/whatever-it-is back in place.

Jack
 

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I would definately put them back into their proper places and replace them if they are worn. The dissimilar metals need this to act as a type of bushing otherwise wear rates would go up dramatically on the softer metals.

Vic
 

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It is possible that it is the caliper bracket retainer clip. Mine (1200 LTD) always fall out when I take the caliper away from that big bracket.
 
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