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Hi - I am going to be trailering my bike 2,500 miles this winter, from Toronto to Arizona. Can anyone give me some tips on strapping the bike down on the trailer. I have a drop-tail trailer with 80" width and lots of tie down points. Thanks for any pointers and advice. :stumped:
 

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There's another thread here: http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/forum1/123432.html that has a number of opinions.

I run straps through the lower triple tree and out below the fairing, then connect tie downs to those and compress the front forks pulling the front tire against the wheel chock.
Then I run a strap through the rear wheel to hold it down. That's extremely secure.
 

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strap it down secure get out and check it when you fill up make sure the tie downs didnt strech and pedal to the metal

some people say not to strap down the rear of the bike i strongly dissagree the rear tire of the bike will walk back and forth on extremely bumpy roads, just throw a tie down through tie tire and just chinch it down
 

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I would also add that you do NOT want to use the crash bars as tie-down points... (yeah... expereince talking here... it was NOT pretty...:( I SHOULD have used the rear tire as the rear anchor...)

For the trip back home from MO to AZ in a few weeks, I will use the adjustable connecting strap that goes over the grips of the handle bars for the front (available @ most bike stores...just can't recall the name of it at the moment) and the rear tire...;) Will run out after lunch and get the name of it...;)
 

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Google it, there are several sites with pictures of how folks secure their bikes.
 

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ob1jeeper, I think you are referring to Canyon Dancers?
 

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Steve, soft ties are your friend. I use 3 sets. Check your owners manual for tie down points. (Or is that in the Gold Book? It's heck getting old.)
 

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Thanks Jerry and all the others for lots of ideas - however I have to warn anyone who uses the same positioning as in the diagram that Jerry gave the link to, that they might as well not put on the rear tie downs, as the only thing they are both doing if placed as in the diagram, is exert some forward pull on the rear of the bike.
I agree totally that the ideal front connection point is the connection point on the forks at the triple tree point. Very secure, and easy to compress the forks a bit.
It doesn't take a mathematical wizard to see that if you describe an arc around each side of the rear of the bike, using the strap in the diagram , some things are very apparent. Firstly, the closer to the top of the arc (front of the bike) the securing point is attached on the arc, the less the strap has the ability to do the 2 things they say in the diagram that the rear strap should be doing - namely prevent the rear of the bike lifting up, and prevent the rear of the bike moving from left to right. This is simple mechanics and the strap connected anywhere near the top of the arc is totally useless in preventing these 2 movements.
The rear straps will have maximum effectiveness to prevent movement in these two planes if they are attached at right angles to the attachment points, and are angled down at about 45 degrees to the bike. If this connection point is just moved slightly forward on the trailer, the straps will now also exert some forward pull on the bike, which is good - but the more forward you put the points, the less the holding power in the two main areas of control you will get.
Another factor to consider is that the lower on the bike you secure your straps, the less holding power the straps have in both of the 2 main areas of control (moving upwards and sidewards), so you should try to secure these straps as high up on the bike as you can (the height of the connection point on the bike will have no discernible effect on the power exerted to pull the bike towards the front of the trailer).
This means that securing the straps to the rear engine guards, no matter how strongly they are mounted to the frame, is not going to be effective, as they are so low down on the back. This would prevent side to side movement, but have almost no protection against the rear jumping up and down when you hit a bump.
It seems to me therefore that there are 2 optimum solutions to secure the rear of the bike.
The first is: if you trust the strength of the connection between the engine guard bars and the frame (and I don't think I do!), then attach a strap to the left side guard bar, run it up over the saddle and attach it to the trailer on the right side. Do the same with the right strap - attach it to the right bar and run it up over the bike to the left side and attach it to the trailer there. The attachment points should be at right angles to achieve maximum holding power. This will prevent up and down and side to side movement of the rear. The disadvantage of this is that you will have to compress down on the foam in the seat at the top and I don't know if this will damage the foam. I am not too happy about doing that.
So after a lot of digging around, I think I have found the best way to secure the rear, given all the advantages and disadvantages of the available tie down points. I took off the rear side covers, and found that I can insert a soft tie around the bike frame behind the cover, and then feed it out down and forward and replace the side cover. Attaching a ratchet tie down to the soft tie, it doesn't rub on any of the bike parts, and makes a very secure tie down.
Additionally, to prevent side to side sway I am going to attach tie down straps to a strap across the handle bars from grip to grip. I will not ratchet these down too tightly - in conjunction with the tightly ratcheted straps to the forks there will not be much strain on the handlebars. It just seems like a good thing to do for some extra peace of mind in case one of the other straps ever broke!

I will report back on this next year after 5,000 miles of winter towing!
Steve.

:waving:
 

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I have pictures in the second post listed above and can tell you with certainy that i have towed over 10,000 miles and never a problem.

Now my question.

Why ask if you feel you already know how?
 

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Sethan - thank you, I did see your pictures earlier. If you refer back to those posts on the forum, and some of the current ones, you will see that many people advise strongly against using the engine guard bars as tie down points. More than one of them said they have actually had them bend or break! So I, being a prudent person, like many others, decline to use the bars to tie down. My choice. As to your last comment, it seems pretty dumb. When I first asked the question I didn't know the answers - now after reading many replies like yours, and doing lots of research based on those replies, I think that I have a pretty good handle on it, and in true givers gain fashion, wanted to share that with others! Isn't that one of the great things about forums like this, sharing knowledge? :doh:
 

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Actually sharingknowledge through experience is helpful.:waving:

Like you said. Your bike, your call.:waving:

No offense taken. No offense intended.:waving:
 

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HyperPete wrote:
ob1jeeper, I think you are referring to Canyon Dancers?
THANK YOU...;) That's the name... Try as I might, I had a mental block and could not get it off the tip of my tongue...:(



At any rate, have been using them for years, and in my experience, they provide one of the safest, and least damaging methods to tying down a bike, that I've had the pleasure of trying...;)
 
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