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I stopped today and had a bike shop put on newbrake pads on my rear wheel. I had them do it because I just wasn't sure how tough it would be. Looks like it's a piece of cake to do so in the future I'll do it myself.

He didn't put any type of a grease on the pads before putting them on though. I've seen on here that it's recommended. Why should that be done? And what type of grease should I buy and how thick to put on the pads? Thanks much!!
 

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puttitin wrote:
He didn't put any type of a grease on the pads before putting them on though. I've seen on here that it's recommended. Why should that be done? And what type of grease should I buy and how thick to put on the pads? Thanks much!!
It is an easy job. It isn't absolutely necessary to grease the back of the pads. If they don't squeal don't worry about it. If they get noisy a thin film on the back where they contact the pistons will help reduce the noise. Use high temp grease, auto parts stores have brake grease and you can get a small tube of it. Regular grease will just get hot and smoke.
 

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The only hard part is.. depending on the age of the bike ( I own a 1200) the caliber pins can get really sticky.... and I mean almost welded./forums/images/emoticons/tongue.gif.. Worst case  in my brake career .... I once had to use a new caliper  keeper pin to drift the old  pin out/forums/images/emoticons/shock.gif .. which worked, but ruined the new pin./forums/images/emoticons/shock.gif. they are cheap, but...... I spent about an hour honing out the pin hole with fine emery paper wrapped around a smaller drill, until the new pins just slid in... The  grease on the back of the brake pads is not nearly so critical as   a)  a shop cloth covering the bike to protect it from the resevoir overflow, as you push the pistons back in......... and b) making sure the pistons will move freely in the cylinders.. SilverDave /forums/images/emoticons/emoticonsxtra/cooldj.gif
 

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Don, copper grease s the mechanics favourite. This stops the new pads squealing for a long time. You just put a smear on the back (metal) part of the pads and on the parts that contact the caliper, and the pins. If your mechanic got an airline and blew out the old brake dust you won't have to worry about squealing anyway.
 
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