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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just bought a 1984 goldwing The way the bike rides is awesome I'm just having a problem with charging I'm hoping I can find someone who has some knowledge about the stator.
 

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Welcome to the forum. Post your technical questions on the tech forum and I bet you get your answer.
 

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:welc: I've moved the thread for you, and updated the title.

Now we can get down to it.

First thing: Are you sure the bike is not charging, and, if so, are you sure the stator is at fault? Often a stator will get blamed, when it is only a melted plug, or wire.

Second: How mechanically, and electrically, inclined are you? Any way you look at this, it will probably be a mess of work.

And last: Have you the tools and a space to do the work?
 

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Start with inspecting the connector with 3 wires coming from the stator. It likes to melt, allow rust inside or loose connector
All will mess you up.
its ok to cut out the damaged/burnt sections and solder in new wire sections.

Multimeter test the terminals coming from the stator to know if it is at fault-
80's Gurus, what is he looking for as reading on each wire??
 

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The stock connector for the stator is located just forward of the lower edge of the battery. This connector is a weak point on the 1200. It is not weather sealed and I believe Honda botched the spec for it. Some people will cut the wires back to where they get clean copper and solder them together. The three yellow wire run up to the regulator rectifier under the shelter. On my bike I spliced in sealed 3.9mm bullet connectors and replaced the stock 16GA wire that runs from the connector to the rectifier with 14GA.
 

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short version:

If it looks okay or it's been spliced out like most have been, disconnect the three yellow wires, cut them if necessary and connect a volt meter with a 100V AC scale across any two of the three wires coming from the stator (back of the engine). With the engine running you should see around 40-50VAC across any combination of the three wires. If all three combinations of any two of the three wires shows that voltage then the stator is okay. If any pair of the yellow wires is a good bit lower than the other two combinations you have a defective stator. If the voltage is okay in the test the problem is not the stator, could be the battery, regulator. Check the battery by measuring the voltage across the battery with the engine off. Start the engine and measure the voltage across the battery with the engine running around 2500-3000rpm. You should see a couple more volts than with the engine not running. If you do see that your second battery is suspect and should be load tested. If you don't see the rise in voltage then it's likely your rectifier/regulator needs


long version and I have one with pics of meters etc. too..

Start the engine and let it warm up. Disconnect the 3 yellow wires from the stator. Run the engine to 3,000 rpm, and check voltage between all three of the yellow wires. There should be a minimum of 50 volts.

For all 1200 models, with the engine off, check for continuity between all 3 yellow wires. You should have continuity. Now check for continuity between each yellow wire and ground. There should be no continuity. If you have no continuity between the yellow wires, you have an open circuit in the stator. If you have continuity between the yellow wires and ground, you have a shorted stator.

The quickest way to check is from each yellow wire to ground with your meter set to the 20 volt range. Each wire should read about 5 volts or more. That's 15 volts minimum, in total. If you have a dead coil in one part of the stator, one of the yellow wires will read 2 or 3 volts.


Most meters aren't going to measure wattage. If you have a meter with an inductive clamp you can measure amperage at each leg (yellow wire) coming out of stator. Remember that AC voltage is produced along this wire. I have a couple meters one with a clamp capable of measuring AC or DC amps. You would multiply Voltage times amperage to get the actual wattage but that would be a pretty difficult task since the voltage on these wires will increase with engine speed. You would have to have 2 meters-1 measuring voltage at an exposed spot in the yellow wire but with the wire still connected. The other meter would be the one with the inductive clamp. You could record multiple readings at various RPMs or just when Volts seem to "top out".

I'm not sure how that info will help you. Most of the problems with the charging system on the 1200's comes from the wiring connectors. If you want to protect yourself from stator damage do this...

1-Remove side cover near battery, seat and shelter (false gas tank)

2-Run 3 new stranded #12 Guage wire from stator to regulator. Be sure to first wrap wires with heat shrink or install in protective flexible conduit and route securely through frame so no chafing of wire will occur.

3. Cut connectors out. Both the ones at the regulator and at stator leaving as much good wire sticking out of stator and r/r. At regulator you may want to mark which red wire on r/r goes with which red on bike etc. The order of the 3 yellow wires can be changed with no effect.

4. Solder your 3 new wires in between r/r and stator. If you aren't sure or aren't good at soldering find someone who is to help you or do a search there are many tutorials both on this site and on the web in general. Use heat shrink to protect exposed connections. I stagger cut my wires so the solder joints don't line up and therefore can't short together.

5. Solder remaining r/r to bike wires together. Go wire for wire ie. red wires, green
 

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another way to check stator w/o cutting the wires is to remove the fasle tank,disconnect the regulator connector and check stator at the yellow wires on that connector,thats assuming the stator connector has been hardwired properly
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well after I read a lot I found two of the stator wires had been cut and the third was not connected. I don't know why but after I spliced the two and connected the third one it started to charge but the wire that had the ends got very hot. One of the things I read was that to check all the connections, I cleaned them and it helped. The thing I'm not sure is why the battery is charging at 14.7 volts when I had a 13.01 reading on the battery.
 

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You may still have an issue at the rectifier, but it's normal for that system to get warm.

As for the charging numbers, yes that seems a little high, but so does the battery voltage. What are you reading the numbers on?
 

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Is this a new battery or on a tender or sat with low charge?
Any of those will make the system work for a while getting the battery full.
At startup you can get a high reading, that should come down soon and settle.

Finish cleaning every connector you can find, the rectifier connector, any ground points are sanded clean and tight?

Examine the spliced in wires for correct gauge.

Trust the members who posted before me, all are good on the older Wings and their quirks.
Take what I say with 3 grains of salt
 

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The thing I'm not sure is why the battery is charging at 14.7 volts when I had a 13.01 reading on the battery.
14.7 is just a shade high and probably not much to worry about. Permanent magnet alternators are generally known for full output since there is no way to regulate the field current. Nature of the beast. Sounds like you're closing in.
 

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Take that stator wire that has the connectors, cut the connectors and splice it too. Be sure your splices are soldered. Hot connector says you have voltage drop across it.
 

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Take that stator wire that has the connectors, cut the connectors and splice it too. Be sure your splices are soldered. Hot connector says you have voltage drop across it.

Totally agree:

any resistance is a source for creating heat.
the Law of Physics at work.

Power ( Watts ) = Current ( times ) Resistance or "Watts of power" in the generic term...

at full output, which a Stator Always is, that connector is having to survive at least 30 amps at higher RPMs, and any resistance will multiply in a hurry as the joint gets hotter. That is evidenced by the burning and melted surfaces.

a good clean soldered splice will remove that resistance, you may need to add in some wire to make the harness long enough. This is because you have to cut the wire back far enough that all of the burned portions are gone. Solder will not adhere to a burned surface.

As Tom suggested, make sure those new surfaces are clean and bright;
Use a soldering paste and a good grade Low Temp Rosin core solder, do NOT use Acid core solder. ( a real no no for wires )

The Reg/Rect ( Regulator/Rectifier ) unit is a Shunt to ground device.
Its' job is to load the Stator down enough to prevent the battery from being over charged...


just adding info for the neophytes searching for help........

Low Temp means ~ 400* melting point....
Normal solders that plumbers use for copper pipes melts at 700* or higher, that will destroy the small gauge wires in the harness.

Apply the solder paste first, it encourages solder to flow better.
 

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Totally agree:

any resistance is a source for creating heat.
the Law of Physics at work.

Power ( Watts ) = Current ( times ) Resistance or "Watts of power" in the generic term...

at full output, which a Stator Always is, that connector is having to survive at least 30 amps at higher RPMs, and any resistance will multiply in a hurry as the joint gets hotter. That is evidenced by the burning and melted surfaces.

a good clean soldered splice will remove that resistance, you may need to add in some wire to make the harness long enough. This is because you have to cut the wire back far enough that all of the burned portions are gone. Solder will not adhere to a burned surface.

As Tom suggested, make sure those new surfaces are clean and bright;
Use a soldering paste and a good grade Low Temp Rosin core solder, do NOT use Acid core solder. ( a real no no for wires )

The Reg/Rect ( Regulator/Rectifier ) unit is a Shunt to ground device.
Its' job is to load the Stator down enough to prevent the battery from being over charged...


just adding info for the neophytes searching for help........

Low Temp means ~ 400* melting point....
Normal solders that plumbers use for copper pipes melts at 700* or higher, that will destroy the small gauge wires in the harness.

Apply the solder paste first, it encourages solder to flow better.


Just make sure the paste you use is for electronic, electrical soldering. It may be hard to find. DO NOT USE plumber paste flux.
 
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