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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all. I am new to this site. I am a decent mechanic and technician with all my other toys and eager to learn what I need to know about my new 1996 GW SE. I say new because it only has 20k miles and is immaculate. First order of business was to change all fluids including final drive oil which I used mobil 1 syn 75W90. I found alot of gunk in the clutch reservoir and cleaned it as well.
My first question is: Should I change the timing belt in spite of the low miles and clean garaged condition of this bike? I am sure it is the original. A local mechanic has said No it doesnt need it. I don't neccesarily trust that assessment after 16 years belt age. Thank you in advance for your welcome advice and opinions. MD.:bow:
 

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Hi MD and welcome to the forum and congrats on your new ride ;)

If the clutch master cylinder was real gunky, you may want to disassemble and clean the clutch slave cylinder too... If the bike is idling good and pulling strong thru it's range, the carbs are probably in pretty good shape but you might want to do a carb sync just to establish a base line and see where they were at...

The 1500's are like most Gold Wings are pretty bullet proof and with a little TLC you'll rack up a quarter million miles or more before any serious maintenance is needed...

You could check the timing belts to see what they look like but I'd be willing to bet they are OK... Change them if it gives you peace of mind or on the off chance they look deteriorated...

Good luck with the new machine... :cheesygrin:

Les
 

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Welcome aboard, and congratulations on your new bike!

Suggested maintenance for a new-used bike of that age and mileage:
-Replace brake fluid
-Replace clutch fluid
-Disassemble and clean clutch slave cylinder
-Replace engine oil and filter
-Grease driveshaft, both ends
-Grease splines on rear hub
-Replace carb air filter
-Replace sub-carb air filter
-Replace cruise filter
-Replace timing belts
-Replace tire valve stems, to all-metal-type
-Replace relays in the box on left side (I'm probably the only one who'd recommend this; they go bad with age)
-Lube switches in handle bar housings
-Check tires for cracking
-Change fuel filter

You can do all the above for about $500 in parts, and I assure you that it will be well spent!
 

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Wild Rhino - Canadian
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Welcome aboard, and congratulations on your new bike!

Suggested maintenance for a new-used bike of that age and mileage:
-Replace brake fluid
-Replace clutch fluid
-Disassemble and clean clutch slave cylinder
-Replace engine oil and filter
-Grease driveshaft, both ends
-Grease splines on rear hub
-Replace carb air filter
-Replace sub-carb air filter
-Replace cruise filter
-Replace timing belts
-Replace tire valve stems, to all-metal-type
-Replace relays in the box on left side (I'm probably the only one who'd recommend this; they go bad with age)
-Lube switches in handle bar housings
-Check tires for cracking
-Change fuel filter

You can do all the above for about $500 in parts, and I assure you that it will be well spent!
I have a 98A with 50K on the meter, and have done all that and more in the two years that I have had it. Some of these are critical due to age or could cause you serious problems. the sub and cruise filters are foam and will deteriorate and get sucked into places you don't want. The valve stems have a proven record of failure, many here change with every tire or go metal. As for the tires, I would check the date code, if more than 5 or 6 years old, get new. The spline lube with Moly 60 is highly encouraged, no subs on the Moly recommended. The timing belt is a toss up, not very many miles, but time keeps marching on. Belt failure is almost a given for getting a new motor or major repair to the old one.
You will get to know your wing better and it will reward you with many miles of happiness.
 

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Gregarious Greeter
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Welcome:waving:MDRanger
 

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That is a great list by Alex and I had done all those things (except replace relays) over the years I had my 1500... My suggestion would be to buy a few relays and keep them on the bike... Auto Zone makes a relay that is compatible and quite a bit cheaper than the Honda realys... I believe it's nomenclature is a Pilot PL-RY1... It's basing configuration will fit the relay socket on the bike but you'll have to cut off the plastic tab with a pair of diagonal cutters...

Another critical area mentioned by Alex and others are the rear drive splines and the drive shaft splines... I have replaced more than one drive shaft on buddies bikes due to lack of proper maintenance (lubrication)...

Les
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Santa has traded in his sleigh

You guys are GREAT! Thanks a bunch and I'm on it! My handle comes from the Ranger bass boat original bass master classic built in the mid 70s I bought after high school and still fishing it. I keep my mechanical soulmates for a long time and always preferred to use something with a ton of memories. It sounds like 'me an the wing' are gonna be good ol' friends and I look forward to talking with you all. Thanks for the welcome!
 

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I bought my '98 SE a few months ago with 7900 miles on the odo. I had to replace the original front tire due to age (cracking). I now have the timing belts on the shelf and a new set of spark plugs that I'll be installing shortly. May as well do all the filters at the same time. I figure at 14 years of service...better do some common sense preventive care so I can ride with greater peace of mind.

Although I am a newbie here too...WELCOME to the group!
 

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F.Y.I: After my rear shock air system went kaput [t'was NOT compressor, as it passed bench test fine], yours truly phoned Progressive; obtained their 412-4223C rear shocks for GL1500 [non-air assist; nitrogen sealed w/springs; has 4 rate settings]. BEST thing I bought for our 1500 in 12 years of ownership. Ride/ handling now better than ever! My two cents input to the Great Lists above. TTFN...papasmurf
 

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Nice purchase

Well done -
You have a bike that will last you the rest of your life with your tendency to properly maintain your mechanicals.
My '96 now has 120,000 miles on it and runs perfectly.
The list Alex posted is a great starting point and will establish baseline standards for all the regular maintenance so it makes sense to tackle it asap. Change the belts if you are in far enough to inspect them..the belts are cheap and then you KNOW they will be fine for another 100K miles....
Ride safe ---
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thankyou Seasoned Wingers

I have completed all filters,fluid flushes, and changes, except for the cruise component and the timing belts are on the way. New dry battery arrived and is installed after trickle charge. I will install new spark plugs while in there. Clutch is now flawless and smooth as silk. I need to research and study before tackling the drive shaft and spline lube to make sure I am perceiving the diagrams correctly and don't get in there and get surprised. I was confident until reading a couple threads of 'drive shaft wont go back in' . Are there alot of gotchas with the shaft lube or easy by the book?? After the belt change I am considering just riding during our nice mild panhandle winter/spring(enjoy with wife). Then I can do the lube during our hibernation 100 degree period in July when it is not that pleasant to ride. Hard to control the urge to surge! I flushed and changed the final drive oil and am thinking the shaft might be OK until summer. But.....that might be impatience talking a little bit :ssshh: If I hibernate in the manuals and DYI docs/threads I may tackle it sooner. It is, again, an age and not high miles thing. I welcome any comments or voice of experience opinions if this sounds like an urgent thing. I can control my impulse to ride rather than do damage. Anyone think that shaft is bone dry in there and urgent?
:1996 and 21k: Thank you again.
 

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To get the drive shaft back in, the u-joint needs to be pushed backwards and up with a long screwdriver to pry it up a little as you push the driveshaft into the u-joint, you have to lube the splines on the back of the motor anyhow and inspect the rubber boot, (replace if torn with one from a Valkyrie as they are larger and don't rip as easy)
#08 BOOT, JOINT 52104-MZ0-A40 001 $12.25
http://www.westernhonda.com/fiche_s...=Motorcycles&make=Honda&year=2000&fveh=132118
 

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In terms of the drive shaft, I used an alternate method to Stu's although similar in nature... I inserted the drive shaft and then slid a 3' piece of 1/2" flat steel under it and then with an upward pressure flipped up the universal joint while slowly rotating the shaft... It pops right in - just takes a little patience...

Les
 

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I saw a description by Dusty Boots where he started his bike and put it in 1st gear. Then with the u-joint turning he inserted the drive shaft then turned the bike off. He said it slid in like butter.
 
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