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Hi All,
I've got a 1985 1200 Aspencade that needs a rear tire. I am pretty handy, but have never done a tire change before. I have got the Clymer manual. Will I save a money by taking the tire off myself, buying one online and taking the rim and new tire somewhere to be mounted? It doesn't look that hard.

Or is this not worth it? I should take it to a dealer, so they can do the work and check out other parts for wear. (I could do this, but I'm no expert.)

What kind of tire does everyone recommend?
 

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Texas Boy
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You will likely save money by doing it yourself. I know the local Cycle Gear shop will mount/balance the tire for free if you bring in the wheel and bring in a receipt that shows you bought the new tire from cyclegear.com. That will also give you a chance to make sure the drive splines are well greased. Use the Moly 60 grease, available at the Honda dealer. I plan to do my first tire change myself this weekend. I'm getting a $20 bead breaker from Harbor Freight and I will use dyna beads for balancing. I've done a lot of mechanic work, changed tires on trucks with a split rim and changed tubes on my old CB750, but this will be my first tubeless removal/mount and the first time I pull the rear wheel on my Wing.

As far as what tire, I've had good luck with the Metzeler 880. A lot of folks swear by the Dunlop E3's on the 1200. I just bought a set of Shinko Tour Master that I'm mounting this weekend. $130 for the set from motorcycle-superstore.com. Good price, good load rating and V speed rated. We'll see how well they hold up and perform.
 

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I can think of two good reasons to take the rear wheel off your bike yourself. One: it will save half the price you paid for the tire, most shops will charge you an arm and a leg to remove the wheel and replace it. Two: If you ever have a flat in a remote location it will pay off to know how to remove the wheel. It's really not difficult. If you have the original took kit that came with the bike you have sufficient tools to remove the wheel. The Clymer manual will show you how to remove the wheel. One thing you ought to have on hand is a tube of Honda Moly 60 Molybdenum Paste which is the stuff you want to lubricate the driven flange splines.
 

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the harbor frieght bead braker is a life saver.... a lot of indy shops will take the old tire off and put on the new if you bring in the wheel and new tire, and simply charge you for that
 

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I've used the 2x4 method on my front tire and it is pretty fast and easy.
 
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