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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just installed a new 160/60/16 radial Cotinental conti motionon on the rear of GL1500 I rode it about 40 miles and you could smell the tire was hot.I got off and felt the tire and it was really hot 42psi in tire. Is the a sign of a bad tire?manufactors date is 2011
 

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the rims of the 1500 are made for bias tires, not radial, I'm not sure if the wrong tire is causing heat, but you may have a safety issue with the wrong type of tire on board.
 

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Junior Grue
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If the tyre fits, holds air and is not rubbing it really makes no difference whether its bias or radial.
After all darksiders put car tyres on there.
Handling of bias tyres versus radial or car tyres is best left to those that have tried them.
 

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Usually a tire gets hot from low pressure. What is the max pressure and load rating of your tire?
 

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Monkey with a Football
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Is the rear brake caliper rubbing on the side of the tire?
 

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I would crawl up under the back of the bike with it on the side stand so the tire is on the ground. That will be running conditions use a flashlight and inspect everything for rub spots. One question did you make sure that the rotation arrow is pointing the right way. Also Dave0340 is right is the tire since its a radial and not a bias tire have a higher PSI rating. Also I thought that one of the reasons for bias ply over Radial tires was the GL1500 weighs more than the GL1800. Radial tires have more flex in the side walls. So your old tires may have just had stronger Side Walls than the new one and the weight of your bike is bending out the side walls causing them to rub.
 

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Still Learning
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I just installed a new 160/60/16 radial Cotinental conti motionon on the rear of GL1500 I rode it about 40 miles and you could smell the tire was hot.I got off and felt the tire and it was really hot 42psi in tire. Is the a sign of a bad tire?manufactors date is 2011
You say it is a 160/60R-16 conti motion
I did a search and came up with 160/80R-16 or 180/60R-16 are available.
Please double check the size of your tire on the bike.
Also, is the tire rubbing on the swingarm? Or as asked, the brake caliper mount? Or anywhere else? We need your feedback, more info needed.
 

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And I'll add that the GL1500 has a narrower rear rim intended for use with bias ply rear tires which in the designated size, have a much stiffer sidewall structure than the Continental Radial. The radial has a softer sidewall and depends on air pressuere more for support and because of those sidewalls, it should be run on a wider rim.

It isn't a case of the tire being defective ...
... it's the application that is wrong and in time, you'll be pulling it off.

;)
 

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Anti-Guru
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I'm +1 with Stu's thoguhts here -gonna need some feedback on what tire you've got there - a good look at the tire sidewall for the actual tire size, and a few other details would be handy.

The 160 should fit, where the 180 would be likely rubbing along the left side...

Just for point of reference, the fitment guide from Continental tire ( http://www.conti-fitmentguide.com/ ) does NOT show a 1500 application for their tires -- so a look at the sidewall to see what you've got and what the load rating for that tire is may be interesting.
 

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I use Conti motions as an inexpensive sport bike tire. They seem to be OK for that application. CrystalPystol +1 on your evaluation. Also, Dave0430 makes a good point...check the load rating. That tire could have been designed to go on the rear of a small displacement sport bike.
 

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I'm really surprised at the number of negative comments about using a car tire. Waayy too many people have proven that it is a very viable alternative.
 

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It aint rocket science
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I'm really surprised at the number of negative comments about using a car tire. Waayy too many people have proven that it is a very viable alternative.
I did not see anyone mention a CT as to the problem, what post are you referring to.

JD
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I Had to edit post 160/80/16 is the size tire i am running No rubbing. tire is clear from swing arm and caliper bracket cked arrow markings for direction is correct tire shows 853lbs load compacity at 42psi.
 

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I Had to edit post 160/80/16 is the size tire i am running No rubbing. tire is clear from swing arm and caliper bracket cked arrow markings for direction is correct tire shows 853lbs load compacity at 42psi.

853 lbs is too light weight a tire for the wing.
841 lbs is the dry weight of the gl1500.
Ad fuel, oil, antifreeze, gear, rider, passenger over 1000 lbs.
Wrong tire to use on these. You need a tire rated at 980 lbs. minimum.
I think even 980 lbs is to light a rating for the wing and is the highest weight rating of a M/C tire available for them. You start riding these bikes in the twisties the way they are capable of and the tires are toast in 10,000 miles, that is what I got out of my last set of E3s before going double Darkside.
 

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853 lbs is too light weight a tire for the wing.
841 lbs is the dry weight of the gl1500.
Ad fuel, oil, antifreeze, gear, rider, passenger over 1000 lbs.
Wrong tire to use on these. You need a tire rated at 980 lbs. minimum.
I think even 980 lbs is to light a rating.
Stu, You may wish to check your calculations again. The numbers you quote are for the bikes total weight but you made that for only a ONE wheel bike. My bike has two wheels, one at the front & one at the back. My GL1500 has a wet weight of 440 kgs or (968 lbs). 260 kgs (572 lbs) on the rear wheel & 180 kgs (396 lbs) on the front. So the tyre that is presently fitted but is getting hot is rated more than enough for a GL1500 wet + pilot. :grin:
 

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Stu, You may wish to check your calculations again. The numbers you quote are for the bikes total weight but you made that for only a ONE wheel bike. My bike has two wheels, one at the front & one at the back. My GL1500 has a wet weight of 440 kgs or (968 lbs). 260 kgs (572 lbs) on the rear wheel & 180 kgs (396 lbs) on the front. So the tyre that is presently fitted but is getting hot is rated more than enough for a GL1500 wet + pilot. :grin:
+1

I have 2 tires also.........:eek:

I was lucky enough to find Black rubber ones that were round......

Seriously though........

When I was buying the Shinko for the 1200, load rating was my concern. I emailed shinko and the Tire store I was getting them from and they both emailed back pretty much the same thing, to check the MC specs on just the weight the rear wheel carries, not the whole bike.
 

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Maybe get back to basics. Radials by nature tend to run warmer. I wonder how warm the tire actually gets? Anything over 120 degrees is hot to the touch but not hot for a tire temp, expecially if you have done some highway time or twistys. There are so many variables to consider. Brake heat, air flow around the tire, inflation, load, tread temp vs sidewall, ambient and road temps, rubber durometer, (soft or hard tire)..... I wouldn't be too worried about temps at 130 degrees or so. That will be pretty darn hot to touch with your hand very long. Another possibility is an alignment issue. Imagine the rear tire wants to go left but you are going straight. If it were possible for each to go there own way they would end up in very different places. Because the bike ties them together they have to travel together as a single unit. The only way that can happen is if one is dragged to a place it really does not want to go. That will create lots of heat and even effect fuel mileage and feel of the bike. Might be a good start to get an infrared gun and check the temp of the tire.
 

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+1

I have 2 tires also.........:eek:

I was lucky enough to find Black rubber ones that were round......

Seriously though........

When I was buying the Shinko for the 1200, load rating was my concern. I emailed shinko and the Tire store I was getting them from and they both emailed back pretty much the same thing, to check the MC specs on just the weight the rear wheel carries, not the whole bike.
John, just out of curiosity did Shinko or the tire store mention anything about the added weight put on the tires on the twisty roads?
 

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The load weight rating of the tire for the bike needs to consider the overall gross vehicle weight. The overall gross vehicle weight is also not divided up evenly over both wheels. The Goldwing, as with most bikes, has a 40/60 weight distribution, 40% on the front axle and 60% on the rear axle. This for an empty bike. When adding weight it must be considered as to where the dividing point is and on how the weight affects which axle. The dividing point as to where the additional weight is on to which axle it is placed is the riders seat. The riders weight gets distributed to both axles, where as the pillon weight is only on the rear axle along with anything stored in the trunk, saddlebags etc. Anything stored forward of the rider, that weight is on the front axle.
 
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