Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
imported post

Hey guys



I've got a Goldwing GL 1000 (i think just goin by what it says on the "gas tank") and its a 1975 or 1976. (If there's a stamp somewhere that has this info on it and you know where it is that would be great :D). Anyways like I said I'm new to bikes but I'm pretty good with anything that has an engine in it. I'm trying to fix this thing up. From what I remember and what my dad tells me the bike was in good running order when it was "stored" 10+ years ago. The only thing he did right when he stored it was put it on the "four point stand" that folds out.(if you guys call it somethin else lemme know). Everything else was wrong; gas was left in tank; i think the pet **** may have been left open cuz the carbs stank of old gas; coolant in , oil in,battery left connected. Basically he just pulled it in the garage one day and it hasnt run since. So theres ur backround. So far I've pulled the carbs, and cleaned em and they would appear to be in good working order. I've pulled the gas tank and I'm treating it with a rust remover/etcher/protective coating system. What I want to know is,other than replaceing all fluids, is there anything else i should dobefore i put it b ack together and try to fire it up? Also, am i missing something withthe kickstarter? It just goes downvery easily and doesnt turn anything over.I hope the engine didn't cease and the kickstarter brokewhen someonetried it.

any help you guys can give would be greatly appreciated
 

·
The Irish Crew
Joined
·
1,248 Posts
imported post

New timing belts before I would even consider starting the beast! And welcome to the forum, we have a few Canadian members here already. :waving:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
475 Posts
imported post

Hi,

Go to this site: http://www.randakks.com

He's a GL1000 specialist, with a whole 'tips' section on step-by-step starting up of an old bike. You especially want to put a little bit of oil in the cylinders (pull plugs) to help the bike turn over.

He's a qualified mechanic and has done hundreds of restorations.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,381 Posts
imported post

There should be a data plate on the left side of the steering head that tells you the year-model and date of manufacture. On my '77 it has large bold print that says 1977 Model.

If you're new to motorcycling, before you even think about jumping on a bike, take a rider safety course. It's very important to do this if you want to have a long life.

Here in the states, they say that 90% of motorcycle fatialities involve riders who never took the course.
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

axelwik wrote:
Here in the states, they say that 90% of motorcycle fatialities involve riders who never took the course.
Interesting statistic. That means that 10% of those who take the course get killed on a bike. I'm going to bet that less than 10% of the whole biking population takes a rider course. If that's true, it seems that it's more dangerous to take the course, you're less likely to be killed on a bike if you don't take a safety course.

Just kidding, I think a course is a good idea, but statistics are slippery! Causation and Correlation are two different critters.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
475 Posts
imported post

A 10% chance of fatality vs. a 90% chance of fatality seems pretty clear to me. It certainly indicates your statistical chance of getting killed goes way down if you take the course.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top