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I am a new convert to the Goldwing world, having just purchased a '93 SE in great condition. Was well maintained, but not ridden much the last 2 years. Everything seem to work well and gets 40+ mpg, so carbs. etc. must be OK.
Only problem is that the front forks are really mushy. There is no air in them and I can not get any in there with my old bicycle pump. Not anxious to try the pump at the local gas station.
What is the correct way to get some air in there?
Dave

PS I have been reading this board for a while, and am impressed with the help everyone gets on here. Thanks in advance.
 

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Bigdave wrote:
I am a new convert to the Goldwing world, having just purchased a '93 SE in great condition. Was well maintained, but not ridden much the last 2 years. Everything seem to work well and gets 40+ mpg, so carbs. etc. must be OK.
Only problem is that the front forks are really mushy. There is no air in them and I can not get any in there with my old bicycle pump. Not anxious to try the pump at the local gas station.
What is the correct way to get some air in there?
Dave

PS I have been reading this board for a while, and am impressed with the help everyone gets on here. Thanks in advance.
Dave, the correct way is with your shop air & a regulator to drop the pressure to 20-25 psi (it doesn't sound like you have a compressor at home)..

They make a hand pump to inflate those front forks & Harley air suspension that not only allows you to pump up slowly by hand but traps the desired pressure while you unhook the fitting.. Those things are expensive though..

Probably my recommendation would be a small battery powered (cigarette lighter in most cases) cheap air pump that your local Wall Mart or discount autoparts storesells.. Those things pump up slowly, are easy to hook up, would also come in handy if you needed to air a bike or car tire around the house, are pretty darn inexpensive for as handy as they are..

Twisty
 

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Bigdave wrote:
I am a new convert to the Goldwing world, having just purchased a '93 SE in great condition. Was well maintained, but not ridden much the last 2 years. Everything seem to work well and gets 40+ mpg, so carbs. etc. must be OK.
Only problem is that the front forks are really mushy. There is no air in them and I can not get any in there with my old bicycle pump. Not anxious to try the pump at the local gas station.
What is the correct way to get some air in there?
Dave

PS I have been reading this board for a while, and am impressed with the help everyone gets on here. Thanks in advance.
Why not just use the compressor on your bike?
 

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  ../forums/images/emoticons/big_grin.gif those  4 buttons on the right lower glove box area SHOULD inflate / deflate your shocks if its stopped, and on .. unless your inflation pump  was disconnected  to install progressive springs ? SilverDave /forums/images/emoticons/emoticonsxtra/cooldj.gif
 

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It won't inflate the front shocks, you'll need the auxilary hose for that. The upper limit for air in the front is only 10psi so it won't make a huge difference from no air pressure. It might be worth pulling the springs from the fork and checking them for length. In time most springs begin to sag. Replacing the springs with Progressive isn't very expensive and isn't a difficult chore. The ride with the Progressives is solid but not harsh in my opinion and makes the bike perform better in the curves. In my 93 I have Progressive springs and Progressive 416 shocks. I had OEM springs and shocks and can say there's no comparison. Cornering is a lot more solid. The bike tracks through the bends like it's on rails and no tendency to bob or wander in the turn.
 

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Mushy front struts could indicate low oil or the antidive setting is too low.. Air pressure in the front usually does not affect strut travel. With the year of the bike I would suggest draining the front fork fluid.. Re-filling to specs, and adjust the antidive settings up one or two notches..
 

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Only the SE got the air valves in the front forks, and you still have to pump the air in via a seperate pump as the buttons on the right side of the shelter only operate the rear.
 

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gaswing wrote:
Only the SE got the air valves in the front forks, and you still have to pump the air in via a seperate pump as the buttons on the right side of the shelter only operate the rear.
There are Aspencades that have been fitted with air valves in front too, mine is an example.
 

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My 94 Aspencade had the on-board compressor and would also pump air into the front struts..
 

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5 or 6psi of air in the front of a gl1500 makes a nice difference. Not quite as firm as Progressives, but much better than with no air at all.
 
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