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:cool: Planning a long ride this summer - so far -

  • From Home to
  • Zion NP to
  • Bryce NP to
  • Arches NP to
  • Sturgis Rally to
  • Yellowstone NP to
  • Glacier NP to
  • North Cascades NP to
  • Olympic NP to
  • Home
We're weighing a lot of alternatives and one is trailering so I have a bunch of questions and anything you trailering experts can add is much appreciated.

1) How much should I expect the handling to change while trailering - any "tips and tricks"?

2) What is the best hitch for a 2008 1800? What can I expect to pay and where is the best places you've found to get them?

3) Trailers - I've seen the pop-up kind - anyone have them? What are your experiences? What is a "best price" on those? Where is a best place to buy them?

4) Other trailers? Storage box kind - I like the ones that match the GL1800 boxes - where have you found the best prices on these? I presume these hold tents, air mattresses, luggage, coolers and the lot OK? What are your experiences?

5) Is there a "Trailering" section in this forum - I didn't see one - but maybe I'm looking in the wrong places?

6) Is there any place to "rent" pop-up or other types of motorcycle trailers?

We are in CA but since we have not gotten into trailering at all yet - we don't know much about it other than some casual browsing of the web.

Thanks in advance for any input from a trailering newbie...:shock:
 

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Blackdog:
I cannot answer any of your trailering questions as I have the same problem. However a co-worker of mine, her and her husband trailer for two-three weeks every summer. They did the tent thing for awhile but year before last they bought a high-end tent trailer that sets up in less than 5 min. She has an 1800 trike that pulls the trailer with. Her husband rides a HD Ultra Classic. She repeatly tells me DO NOT GET A TENT, get a pop-up if you are going to camp out!!!!
I guess the type trailer you want is going to be more necessitated by what you expect to do and how much of it. The tent trailers are bit out of my price range at the moment. I bought a nearly new HF(Harbor Freight) trailer last summer and will simply put a hard cartop luggage carrier on it. Then just do a combination of the tent thing or KOA camping cabins or cottages. Should the trailer not
be "my cup of tea", then I dont have a pile of money in it.
The nice thing is I have everything except the cartop carrier and the bike wired for the trailer.
Sorry for such a lengthy post but I hope any of what I stated might clear up the type of trailer to be considered.
Have a great weekend!!!
 

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We have an Aspen Classic and love it. Sets up very fast and has lots of storage (25cubic feet) and is easy to get to while closed up or while set up. It has a king size bed and a 6' x 6' dressing area. It handles very well even though we have it loaded very heavy. The only down side that I have is that the rear tire seemed to wear a little faster, but that is probably due to the extra weight. You have to be a little more careful about stopping and watch the curbs because it is wider than the bike. I think any tent trailer is better than sleeping on the ground, and most of them are quicker to fold up or set up than a tent and all the camping gear. One thing about it is to be prepared to show it off at the campgrounds, as they really draw a lot of attention. Most people cant believe it opens up as big and has that much room inside, especially if they see you pull in towing it with a motorcycle. Good luck in whatever you decide on, and happy camping.
 

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Blackdog wrote:
:cool: Planning a long ride this summer - so far -

  • From Home to
  • Zion NP to
  • Bryce NP to
  • Arches NP to
  • Sturgis Rally to
  • Yellowstone NP to
  • Glacier NP to
  • North Cascades NP to
  • Olympic NP to
  • Home
We're weighing a lot of alternatives and one is trailering so I have a bunch of questions and anything you trailering experts can add is much appreciated.

1) How much should I expect the handling to change while trailering - any "tips and tricks"?

2) What is the best hitch for a 2008 1800? What can I expect to pay and where is the best places you've found to get them?

3) Trailers - I've seen the pop-up kind - anyone have them? What are your experiences? What is a "best price" on those? Where is a best place to buy them?

4) Other trailers? Storage box kind - I like the ones that match the GL1800 boxes - where have you found the best prices on these? I presume these hold tents, air mattresses, luggage, coolers and the lot OK? What are your experiences?

5) Is there a "Trailering" section in this forum - I didn't see one - but maybe I'm looking in the wrong places?

6) Is there any place to "rent" pop-up or other types of motorcycle trailers?

We are in CA but since we have not gotten into trailering at all yet - we don't know much about it other than some casual browsing of the web.

Thanks in advance for any input from a trailering newbie...:shock:
You might want to pm oregonwinger . He has a camper trailer, and has pulled it behind a 15 and an 18. He's a great guy, and if he has any tips, he'll share them.

Best wishes
 

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Blackdog wrote:
1) How much should I expect the handling to change while trailering - any "tips and tricks"?

4) Other trailers? Storage box kind - I like the ones that match the GL1800 boxes - where have you found the best prices on these? I presume these hold tents, air mattresses, luggage, coolers and the lot OK? What are your experiences?
Our cargo trailers are appx 30 cubic ft capacity. We pulled them lightly andHEAVILY loaded. The amount of weight GREATLY determines the effects on power, breaking, and how much the trailer pushes the rear-end of the bike in the corners. DO NOT UNDER ESTIMATE the amount of weight that you plan to pull.

The critical points: Passing; if you would normally drop one gear in order to pass then with a trailer you'll need to drop two or three depending on weight and your current speed, etc.

Stopping; it takes abite out of the brakes. I don't recommend using electronic assist brakes as the "jerking effect" that is accomanied with them would be unpleasant while laid over in the corners.

Corners; trailers will push you in the corners if you are decelerating.

Tires; expect a trailer to cut your rear tire life expectance.

Normal riding the trailer is barely noticable. You will fill a jerk ifa single tire hits a pot-holeor something to that affect. Cross winds can add a degree of difficullty as well as high speeds (above 75-80 mph, like when you are passing other cars) will whip the trailer around.

Fuel Mileage; Your mileage will vary depending on weight but EXPECT at least a5 mpg reduction if you ride the same (speed and acceleration rates)with and without the trailer. My best has been 43 mpg and worst was 36 mpg.

***When choosing a design for the hitch assembly be sure that the bike can be laid all the way down to the crash bars without the hitch and tongue assemble being put into a bind to avoid future damage should you see fit to fall over.***


Should you take it off road, on steep loosecorners (such as a switch back)it may tend to straighten you out if conditions are severe enough. It has happened but is recoverable.


We generally carry sleeping bags, air matress, stove and BBQ, lanterns, clothes, lawn chairs, 2.5 gal gas can, propane bottles, tent, 96qt ice chest, foods, etc. Sometimes as little as golf clubs. For longer trips the trailers are well worth the money.
 

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Thanks everyone - lots of great info here. I appreciate all the feedback.
 

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I have averticle trailer hitch on my 2008. When I 'm not pulling a trailer I pull the pin and remove reciever, and the hitch disapears. The design also makes it easier to change the tire than with some other hitches. I've never had any problems with stablility or quality with the hitch.

Got it from WingStuff - slow shipping but no problems ever otherwise. Can't comment on the trailer I made my own from a utility trailer and a car top carrier.



http://www.wingstuff.com/pgroup_detail/272_Trailer_Hitches_Racks/2152_2001_2009_GL1800_Goldwing_Vertical_Trailer_Hitch/?goto=%2Fpgroup_list%2Fgl1800%2F272_goldwing_Trailer_Hitches_Racks%2Fdes%2F%3Fpage%3D2
 

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When Carol and go anywhere we have to pull a trailer because she has Multiple Sclerosis and needs some sort of device to help her get around whether it be a rolling walker or an electric scooter.

When loading you will want about 25% of trailer weight on the tongue. Too little weight on the tongue and the trailer will "wag" and that's not a great feeling when the rear of the bike goes unexpectedly goesleft or right. Too much tongue weight and it will over load the the bike and the gas mileage will drop drastically and rear tire wear will be more dramatic. You will have to keep trying till you find what is comfortable for you when trailering.

When buying a trailer try to get one with 12-15" rims. A trailer with 8" rims makes the trailer tire spin around 20,000 rpm. That makes for trailer tire wear to be significant. 8" tire will wear out in about 2,000 miles.

But as stated before, becareful when corning or braking. Be extra careful when braking in a corner. With a hevily loaded trailer give yourself about twice as much stopping distance as you would without the trailer. Don't ever get to feeling that you don't even feel the trailer behind you. That's when you will make a mistake.

Best of luck.

Brian


Edited: When braking, always use both brakes and apply the rear brake first. If applying the front brake only it can cause the bike to "jack knife" by the trailer pushing the bike and the rear of the bike becoming to light.
 

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You all are awsome. You really know your stuff and I too Have gotten alot of info on here Thankyou all for all of your help to everyone


Wolfy
 

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82gl1100iwingman wrote:
When buying a trailer try to get one with 12-15" rims. A trailer with 8" rims makes the trailer tire spin around 20,000 rpm. That makes for trailer tire wear to be significant. 8" tire will wear out in about 2,000 miles.
We have had good experience with the 8 inch wheels. Started pulling these trailers in '81 with our '80 Interstates. Got at least 100,000 miles on the trailers.

Tire wear depends on the quality of the tire. We always get at least 20,000 miles out of the tires. Never heard of anybody getting only 2,000 miles. I am currently running Goodyear tires on mine. I am pretty sure that the other trailer is also running Goodyear.

As far as the higher revs per mile. We are still using the original wheel bearings, so I don't think that it is a drawback.
 

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Blackdog wrote:
We're weighing a lot of alternatives and one is trailering so I have a bunch of questions and anything you trailering experts can add is much appreciated.

1) How much should I expect the handling to change while trailering - any "tips and tricks"?
*** Little change when just driving along. Acceleration/deceleration change considerably based on total weight but you will quickly adjust. Give yourself EXTRA stopping time/distance, you'll need it. Just don't try any "sudden moves" and you should be OK. CORNERING is the dangerous part. Try to turn to quickly and a trailer can shove your rear end right around and out from under you.

2) What is the best hitch for a 2008 1800? What can I expect to pay and where is the best places you've found to get them?
***Dunno.

3) Trailers - I've seen the pop-up kind - anyone have them? What are your experiences? What is a "best price" on those? Where is a best place to buy them?
***We have a Time-Out Trailer (see their website for lots of info and prices). It truly is great. Very good quality, tows like a dream, sleeps good too. A little pricey, around $4,000 new/loaded and just about impossible to find used. But it will definitely pay for itself.

4) Other trailers? Storage box kind - I like the ones that match the GL1800 boxes - where have you found the best prices on these? I presume these hold tents, air mattresses, luggage, coolers and the lot OK? What are your experiences?
***We have pulled a home-made box all over Michigan and southern Canada and it was dirt cheap to build and super handy. Just a utilitarian thing though, not pretty. It had 8# wheels and I just cut down an old boat trailer axle to make it. Worked good, no significant tire wear problems as long as it's aligned properly. It did tend to "bounce" a little, the springs were stiff and it had no shocks. Many companies offer fancy matching units and they are all over the web.

5) Is there a "Trailering" section in this forum - I didn't see one - but maybe I'm looking in the wrong places?
***Dunno, but you can search for anything on the world's greatest GW site.

6) Is there any place to "rent" pop-up or other types of motorcycle trailers?
***Dunno.
***On a final note: Trailering can be great if you just understand that everything is a trade-off. Mileage versus hotel expenses or the pain of sleeping on the ground. Nimble handling versus cautious cornering. That sort of thing. It does offer versatility and more options is always a good thing. Some may talk like it will wear out your bike but I've never found any signs of premature wear and most of it was back when we had a 750 Yamaha. The 'Wing makes that old boat look like a dog. Odds are you'll love a trailer. Be safe and enjoy!
 

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I wasn't sure I was a trailer person, so I made one from a HF trailer, cut width by 5 inches, added a 67 inch carrier with 20 ft[suP]3 [/suP]capacity. Has 12 inch wheels. Cost was about $450. but, I could sell it for $650. in a minute, so no real risk there.

Most important is to keep bike straight when stopping to turn or momentum of trailer can keep pushing rear of bike if you are at an angle [not difficult]. Trailer is not really noticeable while pulling, for me.

Later, I learned the 1/4 inch treated wood was NOT necessary to trailer; carrier can easily be bolted to the frame when corner welded.

NEVER lose your checklist. You can make one for moteling or camping here: http://micapeak.com/checklists/mclist.html

Save it for your next trip, because you just won't remember everything. I ride with a GL1800 with the exact same setup.

Here is a pic:
 

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I once hauled a 12 ft. Zodiak boat, with 15 horse Merc moter, gas, etc in my trailer. Should have seen the looks when I rolled up to the boat ramp on my MC, took everything out, pumped up the boat and went fishing.
 

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Blackdog, the best trailer hitch is the one you can afford. I didn't think much of the ShowChrome type, so I researched the Bushtech and Rivco. I like the Bushtec due to the fact you can remove the back of it for tire changes, but I like the Rivco for overall quality, and it's less than half the weight 8 lbs, if I remember correctly. It does require a hole through the rear fender, but that was no big deal to me. And, I basically made the 3" drop aluminum tonge and aluminum ball stay in permanent by squeezing some Velumoid between it's receiver and tongue. No chance of theft, or rattling. I think it looks good on the bike, too. On that "other" board, the Bushtec wins 2-1 over Rivco, because, .................. well, it's a Bushtec. It's like buying a Snap-on, when a lifetime Craftsman will do very well. Altho, I have to say, some prefer to be able to remove the back of "U" to get the rear wheel out. That's one thing we can't do with the Rivco. But, I just lay the bike on the crash bar, and the tire comes right out. A lot less work than tearing a dirty hitch apart.

As for trailering. If it's a small trailer, like a lightly built Harbor Ft., or a Bushtec, or something like that, and it's not loaded very much, you'd hardly know it's there. Now, a large camper trailer, like a RollaHome, or a Large BunkHouse SE, you're talking some weight. I pull a RollaHome, and it's really not a job at all. I just allow a bit more distance, and am ever so attentative to what's going on around me. Haven't had what I'd call a close, or even a far call ;). The 1800's brakes are so good, that braking doesn't seem to be a bit of a problem at all. I've had it all over the West, and no incidents. It pulls the mileage down 5 to 10, depending. It was a bit un-nerving with the 1500, when braking, especially in a tight curve. The 1500 doesn't have the braking power the 1800 has. But, I pretty well kept up with groups, all riding solo, on twisties. The 1500 pulled the trailer very well, just didn't stop quite as well. I thought it did fine, till I hooked it to the 1800. Anyway, I pulled it to Libby, Mt, at about 600 lbs, and it tracked perfect, and behaved exceptionally well. If I could tent camp, tho, I'd still prefer to pull something like a Bustec, Escapade, or some such.

Good luck with your decision.
 

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Blackdog,

The wife and I have been through each of the places you have listed with our trailer. We have an older Timeout trailer that works great for us. See attached picture.

The hitch is a Dauntless made in Washington State near Seattle. The trailer is pulled from the frame of the bike, not from the saddlebag mounts. It does not interfere with removal of the rear tire, and when you remove the ball it is completely invisible. Make sure you get the relay plug in wiring harness so there is no problem with your lights wiring. Cost is about $310 + Shipping/Handling. http://www.dauntlessmotors.com/hitch-pages/hondahitches.htm

Make sure the trailer has a swivel hitch coupler. You can turn the trailer or bike on their side without affecting the other. Cost is about $180 plus shipping and handling.

Make sure you load the trailer properly. You should have about 20-30 pounds of hitch weight for a 200-300 pound trailer load. If you have it loaded more to the back it will wobble dangerously behind you.

Like the other guys said starting and stopping will take longer, plan for it. Once you are going you will barely notice the trailer is behind you. Don't forget it is there and cut short when passing or you will find yourself with a buttload of roadrash.

Most of the motorcycle trailers out there can be pulled by your 1800. Pick the one you like the best and has the amenities you want/need. Don't overpack, and don't take more than you really need to. Your tires and gas mileage will appreciate the lighter weight. You will go through tires much faster towing than normal.

Take a couple of short day trips to get used to it and you should not have to many problems.

Henry
 

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Bikers are supposed to be tough,there's nothing at all wrong with a tent,its a WHOLE lot cheaper.


psst: If you not that tough like me,(I'm not as good as I once was) another 25 bucks for a air mattress,and you'll sleep as good in the tent,as you would the pop up....
 

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kyboy67 wrote:
Bikers are supposed to be tough,there's nothing at all wrong with a tent,its a WHOLE lot cheaper.


psst: If you not that tough like me,(I'm not as good as I once was) another 25 bucks for a air mattress,and you'll sleep as good in the tent,as you would the pop up....
I stepped into that part of my life, having just a sleeping bag, then got to the point I couldn't sleep. So, we got an air mattress. That helped for a cpl. years, but finally, that wasn't enough. My problem is the getting up from ground level. That is getting painful. I can hardly work around the lower parts of the bikes these days. I had polio when I was a teen, and that doesn't help, either. Now, I'm about to the point of selling the trailer, and just use motels. :( I hate motels, generally, but one finds a really good one, once in awhile.
 

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Stugis Ehh Better have your reservation in by now or you won't be camping within 75 miles of the place!!1
Normal all of Sd pop is 700k roughly Stugis draws in 550-600k for the 2 weeks
 

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My first decade of touring, was in the 60s & early 70s. Me & the wife explored most of the northern continent. We usually pulled into a gas station to clean up & such, eat something, & pull somewhere where the bike wouldn't be seen...cornfields or wherever.

No saddlebags/trunk, just my old duffle bungee'd to the sissy bar. We just slept on the ground [covered in bug repellent] & at day break, toss a handfull of instant coffee in our mouth & wash it down with some warm soda. We thought we were hikin' in tall cotton, too.

Many restaurants would not serve "Bikers" & few motels would allow "Bikers" to stay. Many times breakfast was brunch at a backwoods candy machine.

Clownburgers & marginal Motels with running water, while touring,still feel like luxuries, to me.

I must've been really young, a while back. :?
 
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