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:XI own a '75 wing that has been recently put back on the road from a 20 year layoff. The other day, I cranked it, turned the key off. When I turned it back on, there was no power to lights, starter, anything. The shop told me that I needed a solenoid, I can't see this, as I have no lights, dummy lights, etc. I couldn't find any blown fuses. Switch maybe????
 

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btexas wrote:
:XI own a '75 wing that has been recently put back on the road from a 20 year layoff. The other day, I cranked it, turned the key off. When I turned it back on, there was no power to lights, starter, anything. The shop told me that I needed a solenoid, I can't see this, as I have no lights, dummy lights, etc. I couldn't find any blown fuses. Switch maybe????
I'm not sure about the 75 wing, but on my 81, there is a fuseable link on the side of the solenoid under a plastic cover attached to the solenoid, and that link could be blown. It is my guess that is where you'll find the problem. It could be the switch, but to check, get a ohm meter and set for 20 VDC, open the fuse panel under your false tank, and check at each fuse for voltage. At least one fuse will have voltage even with the switch off if the link is not blown. If you have power, then it sounds like the switch.:D

Gene:waving::11red::11red::11red::cooler:
 

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hi btexas,

When you checked the fuses did you also clean all the contacts and the fuses? Sometimes those contacts get dirty and won't allow full contact with the fuse.

Also, check the main fuse at the solenoid. Make sure you disconnect the postive contact at the battery. Then remove the whole soleniod unit. The main fuse should be locate on the back side behind a plastic cover. This may be different than other years, but that's the location on my 81 GL1100.
 

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Don't know much about the 1000's but"Nothing" when you tirn the key is usually a "short" in the wiring or the "Battery" is disconnected or did or fuses? (including the "Main Fuse" ?:baffled:
 

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I'd also bet on the fusible link. Been there, done that. The shop is wrong, there's no solenoid on the bike anyway. Perhaps they were referring to the starting relay. If the start relay failed you should be able to kick start the bike I'd think.
 

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Thanks! I'll check that first thing in the morning, By the way, I'm just up the street from you in Temple, maybe I'll see you around.
 

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btexas wrote:
Thanks! I'll check that first thing in the morning, By the way, I'm just up the street from you in Temple, maybe I'll see you around.
No problem. Some of the others agree with me about the fusable link, athough I too called the starter relay a solenoid, which exavid mentioned, which even though the book calls it a starter relay, technically it is a high tech solenoid. If the fusable link is blown, go to Autozone or Advanced Auto Parts and get a heavy duty 30 AMP blade fuse holder and splice in place of the fusable link. Look for a waterproof one. Do not run it without a fuse by bridging across the bolts that hold the old fusable link, or you might have a fire on down the road. Yes I figured it was Temple Texas. I go thru there sometimes on weekends when I'm cruzin around. Hope to see you.:D

Gene:waving::11red::11red::11red::cooler:
 

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hey btexas,

I agree with all. However, I would be asking why the main fuse blew:baffled:! Now, that will take some futher investigation.
 

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teacher wrote:
hey btexas,

I agree with all. However, I would be asking why the main fuse blew:baffled:! Now, that will take some futher investigation.
It seems that as Goldwings age, the fusable links have a tendency to blow on their own, probably due to oxidation of the material since it is exposed to air. The on/off cycle of the power system will cause that thin strip of metal to break down over time. Apparently, over time, they blow for no apparent reason. I've heard of them blowing on vehicles that use this type for years without having any actual short or reason to blow. The fusable links in american cars are sealed in rubber or plastic, they don't get exposed to the air, and seem to last forever. JMHO.:D

Gene:waving::11red::11red::11red::cooler:
 

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Hey guys- i had same problem with my 1982 gl1100-main fusable link blew-at relay-

traced and found the cause to be main wire from fuse holder rubbed thu-and

grounded out on bike frame-re- taped up wire harness- replaced fuse link -

now all is well-Craig A:cool:
 

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I'm not convinced about all this.. You said you were able to crank the engine.. Turned the key off... turned it back on and nothing..

Why not just charge the battery up, or jump it with a known good battery...???:baffled:

Fuses don't blow when you turn the key off.. Did I miss something here? :baffled:
 

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Teacher, both Craig and Renagade bring up vaild points, a lot of times it is a short that causes it to blow. Always check the wiring harness completely from tail lights to headlight to anywhere the harness can rub the frame or somewhere else. But as I mentioned, they have been known to blow for no apparent reason.:D

Gene:waving::11red::11red::11red::cooler:
 

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Hi btexas and welcome to the forum. I agree with the main fuse theory. They don't blow with the ignition turned off, but they will sometimes instantly when you turn it on again. If you don't know where to look, any of the manuals, Honda; Clymer; etc. will show you where it is located. It will look like a miniature dog bone made of lead and held in by a screw on each end. Gene recommended replacing it with a blade type and I agree with that. Good luck and keep us informed.
 

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Welcome to the forum. Main fuse or dodgy ignition switch are what to check. Your shop steered you wrong on this one. :waving:
 

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GWNorman wrote:
Welcome to the forum. Main fuse or dodgy ignition switch are what to check. Your shop steered you wrong on this one. :waving:
As for the fusible links they can go at any time and with any current or none through them. They do tend to oxidise and break of their own accord. I won't say with certainty that that's btexas problem, but that's the place I'd look first and correct by eliminating the link for a blade type fuse. As for the starting relay you could jump it's main coil to the battery to check it out, be sure the bike is in neutral, on the centerstand and the kill switch off.
 

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:clapper:Gentlemen,

Turns out it WAS the switch. GLESTER gave me what I needed to check, the fusible link had power on both sides, and the middle pin to the switch was hot. once I had the switch off, there was no continuity from the middle pin to anywhere in any position. I want to thank y'all for the help, as it saved me a fortune in tools that I would have launched over the fence into my neighbors yard in frustration (he NEVER returns them!) Seriously, Thanks guys!
 

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GLester wrote:
I too called the starter relay a solenoid, which exavid mentioned, which even though the book calls it a starter relay, technically it is a high tech solenoid.
Just 'cause I enjoy the occasional splitting of hairs, (due to my increasing baldness) I'd argue that in normal engineering usage it's a relay. A solenoid normally refers to an electrical coil wound around a hollow form with a ferrous metal core moved by the magnetic field of the coil to perform a mechanical movement. Not as commonly seen but asolenoid can also refer a hydraulic cylinder and piston, as well as a pneumatic cylinder and piston.

BTW glad you gave btexas a good steer, another one up and running again!
 

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exavid wrote:
GLester wrote:
I too called the starter relay a solenoid, which exavid mentioned, which even though the book calls it a starter relay, technically it is a high tech solenoid.
Just 'cause I enjoy the occasional splitting of hairs, (due to my increasing baldness) I'd argue that in normal engineering usage it's a relay. A solenoid normally refers to an electrical coil wound around a hollow form with a ferrous metal core moved by the magnetic field of the coil to perform a mechanical movement. Not as commonly seen but asolenoid can also refer a hydraulic cylinder and piston, as well as a pneumatic cylinder and piston.

BTW glad you gave btexas a good steer, another one up and running again!
Hate to bust your bubble, pulled out the book and looked, also looked on my bike, 75-83 uses a SOLENOID. I confirmed this on my bike this weekend by pulling mine while putting on the new battery cables and main fuse bypass (30 amp weathertight fuse) and it is definately a solenoid. It also meets the engineering definition. See page 11 Troubleshooting, Clymer 1975-1983 manual, also page 111, and diagram on page104. As a former ASE Certified mechanic, I've seen a lot of solenoids over the last 35+ years of working on cars and bikes, and I can tell the difference between a magnetic plunger switch(solenoid) and a electronic relay. I don't know what the 1200s-1800s use, having not gotten the chance to work on them.:p

Gene:waving::11red::11red::11red::cooler:
 

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GLester wrote:
I don't know what the 1200s-1800s use, having not gotten the chance to work on them.:p
My bubble is far from burst! I'm in the same situation as you except for GL1000 and GL1100. I've only had experience on the 1200 and 1500. For the GL1500 the Honda Service Manual refers to the starter relay in several places (pg 18-3, 18-4, 18-5, and more), the Clymer Manual on page 342 and in several instances in the schematics refer to the starter relay. Looking at the thing it sure looks like a relay. My 1200 looked pretty much the same but I don't have the books any more for that model.

So it's possible we're both right, I can't argue about the older models since I haven't had one apart.
 
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