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having some problems so made an appt with the V.A. The clinic I go to is on a REAL small air force base, maybe 100 actual military there. Rode out on my bike, like I have done many times before, rolled up to the gate....they would not let me in.
It was 97 degrees out.
They said in order to get on I needed a long sleeve shirt and boots, I was wearing a short sleeve shirt and these waterproof slipons I wear as I can not wear boots....

Had to turn around and go home......
 

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Here on FT Hood where I work, you have to wear boots, longsleave shirt, gloves, reflective vest, helmet, and eye protection and also pants(not shorts). It is a DOD requirement for all the safety gear and you also have to have proof of the MSF course before they let you on post. And it was 105 here yesterday going home from work and I was on the 1100 yesterday. The 1500 is nicer to drive to work when it is hot, because it doesn't cook your legs like the 1100 does. I don't normally wear LS shirts, or gloves or the reflective vest when I don't have to go on post. But it's their rules and if you want to play, you have to follow their rules.:)

Gene:waving::15grey::15grey::15grey::byebye:
 

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I work on a military post and what GLestersaid is correct. I ridemy 1100 65 miles every day it isn't raining (so about 355 days a year) and it's been 114 on the way home for the past two weeks. I wear the full outfit on the way in but usually "forget" to put the long sleeve shirt on when I leave. Never been stopped yet. I guess the security/guards don't want to get out of their air conditioned vehicles to make me put it on! Or they think I'm nuts for riding in this kind of heat and just take pity on me.

This week it's been over 95 degrees when I leave the house for work at 0500. 32 miles later when I get to work I'm already hot and sweating! AND IT DOESN'T GET HOT UNTIL NEXT MONTH!

Your not alone don_berryand GLester! I bought a half helmet last summer and it helps a lot in the hot weather. I don't care for it though, I prefer my full-face flip up. All but three miles each way (in town) are on the open highway with speeds from 55-70. I have highwaypegs and use them as much as possible to keep the heat off my legs. If I didn't have them I would probably take the car this time of year!

Bob :11grey:
 

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I'll bet a mesh jacket would be cooler than a long sleeved shirt.
 

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Don, you might get the doctor at the base to give you a chit permitting the shoes. They looked plenty safe to me. Too bad the VA clinic is on a base so you have to go through the DOD rules, since I think VA is separate. Might be a good excuse to ride through Knoxville up to Johnson City!:cool:

I noticed that the local Cycle Gear store carries the DOD vest. It looks built for combat!
 

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I hate the DOD rules also. The safety officer at Whiteman AFB, MO will not define what a long sleeve shirt of contrasting colors is or brightly colored. DOD rules state that during the days a long sleeve shirt and at night a reflective vest. As stated you must also have eye protection unless your windshield goes over the top of your head in a upright position. Long pants, full fingered motorcycle gloves, of which I wear the summer gloves which have holes in them to let your hands breathe easier. Shoes must cover the ankles and be made sturdy. Most of the time, it depends on who is working the gate if you are allowed in.

I went to Ft. Leonard wood over the Memorial day weekend and it was the first time there since 1961. Had no problem getting on the base. Done some shopping at the BX and went out and got on my bike. The key was placed in the ignition but not started. Along came the MP's and he asked me where my helmet was. At first I thought it was on but then realized it had been left at the cashiers counter. He informed me that if a person was sitting on the motorcycle even tho it was not running a helmet must be worn. At this point I came close to calling him and idiot.

Have been trying to contact the right people who can exempt retirees and civilians from wearing all this garbage. Informed the general on base that if this old man is ever in a accident on his base that I would sue since all the garbage being required to wear was to have stopped me from having a wreck. Retirees and civilian workers are not required to have a MSF course completed to ride on base. There are some exceptions to that and if it is the case then the instillation must pay for the course.

I better stop now before the old top is blown.

Dirt:p:p:p:baffled:
 

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Well, like I've heard it said before, "An elephant is a mouse built to DOD standards" and it sounds like not much has changed since I was driving my bike on and off military reservations back in the 70's. They go so overboard on some stuff...I can understand being safe, but how safe are you when you pass out (or worse) from heat exhaustion trying to wear all the garb you need to wear to get in and out of a military base. Fortunately, where I was stationed (NAS Mirimar in San Diego) there was a pull off parking area just before you went through the gates and I would pull over there and dress up for the guards. All of us would do it in full view of the guard shack but technically we were off the base and there wasn't anything they could do about it....two could play their game:p
 

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:cooldevil:Timmus wrote:
. Fortunately, where I was stationed (NAS Mirimar in San Diego) there was a pull off parking area just before you went through the gates and I would pull over there and dress up for the guards. All of us would do it in full view of the guard shack but technically we were off the base and there wasn't anything they could do about it....two could play their game:p
There have been people whom I known including myself, who have pulled up to the gate, stopped, got off the bike, then put all the gear on. Reversed it going out the gate. Makes people unhappy but the rest of us are smiling from ear to ear.

Dirt:cooldevil:
 

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I would take all the gear and put it on at the gate, but it is the boots that get me......maybe I could have the guards put them on for me :dude:

When I was in the Army, I was stationed in Germany and then came back to Kansas. I honestly hated being stationed in the States. Overseas, you did your job, worked hard, played hard.
In the States you worried about shoes looking good , clothes pressed just right etc. The actual job was secondary to all of the other bs.....

I reenlisted just to get out of there and back to Europe.

sorry, my rant for the day, I just do not believe a long sleeve shirt is going to help me much if I go down, nor the boots. Actually, if I go down, I am broken and there isn't a whole lot going to help me short of an ambulance.
 

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Well, they say that the reason there are anchors outside a navy base is to keep it from floating away in the chicken sh*t:cheeky1:...

I agree about the BS....when I was on carriers, there was too much work to do to worry about whether your hair touched your ears a little bit or your moustache touched your lip....once we got back to our home land base, everything changed. I was in for 6 years and even though they were waving a $20K check in front of my eyeballs to re-enlist, I said thanks, but no thanks....I loved what I did but couldn't handle the extraneous crapola...just let me do my job
 

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dirt wrote:
I hate the DOD rules also. The safety officer at Whiteman AFB, MO will not define what a long sleeve shirt of contrasting colors is or brightly colored. DOD rules state that during the days a long sleeve shirt and at night a reflective vest. As stated you must also have eye protection unless your windshield goes over the top of your head in a upright position. Long pants, full fingered motorcycle gloves, of which I wear the summer gloves which have holes in them to let your hands breathe easier. Shoes must cover the ankles and be made sturdy. Most of the time, it depends on who is working the gate if you are allowed in.

I went to Ft. Leonard wood over the Memorial day weekend and it was the first time there since 1961. Had no problem getting on the base. Done some shopping at the BX and went out and got on my bike. The key was placed in the ignition but not started. Along came the MP's and he asked me where my helmet was. At first I thought it was on but then realized it had been left at the cashiers counter. He informed me that if a person was sitting on the motorcycle even tho it was not running a helmet must be worn. At this point I came close to calling him and idiot.
Have been trying to contact the right people who can exempt retirees and civilians from wearing all this garbage. Informed the general on base that if this old man is ever in a accident on his base that I would sue since all the garbage being required to wear was to have stopped me from having a wreck. Retirees and civilian workers are not required to have a MSF course completed to ride on base. There are some exceptions to that and if it is the case then the instillation must pay for the course.

I better stop now before the old top is blown.

Dirt:p:p:p:baffled:
Have you ever wondered who decides what rules to enforce and which ones they ignore? I work on McChord AFB and I got pulled over by the SP's because he said my front plate looked different then the back one. It was pretty beat up from hitting curbs and driveways and such. But the point is half the cars on this base don't even have a front plate and it is required in Washington. I asked themn why they didn't pull them over and they said they only pull someone over if they do something wrong. Eh! They are driving withouta front plate. How wrong do they have to get. I at least had a plate and they pulled me over because it lookeddifferent. Go figure. I guessI should have asked tospeak to the idiot controlofficer.
 

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When I was in the Army I heard that if they couldn't train you to be a cook they made an MP out of you.
 

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This is nothing new for the last 10 years or so on Air Force bases. The trouble started when the younger riders all started getting sport bikes and dying on them from excessive speed and inexperience. The Air Forces answer was to make all riders wear full finger gloves, over the ankle boots, long sleeve shirts, long pants, reflector vest or belt, and of course a helmet. The Air Force has gone as far as telling it's people that if they get in an accident off base without all of this gear on, the military might or might not pay for any medical expences. I retired 2 years ago but still work on base. I have to go through the gates twice a day with all of the extras on. It's not going to change, and they won't make any exceptions, so be warned if you have to travel on any military instalation, you'll be required to have this gear on.
 

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:waving::waving:Welcome to the World's Greatest Goldwing Site Wheeler 1963 :waving::waving:

Glad to see another member posting.
 

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Sounds like the same crap everywhere. In Fallon, if they saw you out in town not wearing your gear (base sticker id's you everytime) they would revoke your BASE driving privledges PERMANENTLY. I once got pulled over IN MY DRIVEWAY in base housing, because I was backing my bike out of the garage INTO THE DRIVEWAY to start it and warm it up. No gear=citation. you needed to wear all your gear to even touch the bike on that post.
 

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ScottInNV wrote:
Sounds like the same crap everywhere. In Fallon, if they saw you out in town not wearing your gear (base sticker id's you everytime) they would revoke your BASE driving privledges PERMANENTLY. I once got pulled over IN MY DRIVEWAY in base housing, because I was backing my bike out of the garage INTO THE DRIVEWAY to start it and warm it up. No gear=citation. you needed to wear all your gear to even touch the bike on that post.
I think the regulations are exaggerated in some cases. I would ask the cop if one was sitting in a car and it was not running, then would that person be required to wear a seat belt. On retirees and civilians off the base, they can not provoke your base driving privileges if caught not wearing all the silly stuff. One of the roads that run to the base about a mile from my house is patrolled quite frequently by the SP's. Many times I have seen them go by talking on a cell phone and not wearing seat belts in a gov't vehicle. Turned a few of them in for that , speeding and running stop signs. Think word got around not to mess with me or do that going by the house or they will be turned in. If they want to play the chicken s**t game so can I.

It appears that on most military installations that they just enforce the law for everyone except for themselves. From my knowledge the bike has to be running and in motion for you to get a ticket. You might want to check your base regulation. Some cops are known to write a phony ticket. If you get one, make sure thru the base safety office and first sgt that it is valid.

Dirt
 

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exavid wrote:
I'll bet a mesh jacket would be cooler than a long sleeved shirt.
In the last few weeks I've put in over 1500 miles with a mesh jacket in hot weather... 90s to over 100. I can truthfully say that a mesh jacket is cooler than a T-shirt. It lets the air through, but it doesn't let the sun through. No sunburn, windburn, etc.

And above 100 or so I use an evaporative cooling vest... it's like having a "cold blanket" around your torso (as long as you keep moving). It works best without a windshield, but still works (to a lesser extent) with a windshield/fairing.

Mesh jackets are available for about $100 these days and you can find evap vests for $30 to $45.

And my white helmet doesn't heat up like the dark-colored ones.

It's not hard nowdays to wear protective gear and still stay relatively cool.
 

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logtech wrote:
Have you ever wondered who decides what rules to enforce and which ones they ignore? I work on McChord AFB and I got pulled over by the SP's because he said my front plate looked different then the back one. It was pretty beat up from hitting curbs and driveways and such. But the point is half the cars on this base don't even have a front plate and it is required in Washington. I asked themn why they didn't pull them over and they said they only pull someone over if they do something wrong. Eh! They are driving withouta front plate. How wrong do they have to get. I at least had a plate and they pulled me over because it lookeddifferent. Go figure. I guessI should have asked tospeak to the idiot controlofficer.
One of the happiest days of my life was when I retired from the Air Force. After getting my retirement ID card I never again set foot on a military base. Nearest AF base is about 500 miles away and I have no plans to visit.

(But I still wear ATGATT [minus the reflective vest] because I hate the thought of going down without it.)
 

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dirt wrote:
ScottInNV wrote:
It appears that on most military installations that they just enforce the law for everyone  except for themselves.
That's true of the PO-LEESE just about everywhere. I was at a store and an off-duty cop in his take home car pulled into the handicap spot. Thinking that he may have missed the sign, I said, "Officer, that's a handicap spot." He told me that he was allowed to park there because he's a cop.

My route to work used to take me past a state police barracks. I'd be doing 75 and every morning an off duty trooper, trying to get to work, would pass me like I was standing still

The stories are endless.
 
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