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I’m checking the stator on a 1985 aspencade I unplugaged the 3 yellows and set my multimeter to ac 200 v and hooked my ground to battery and tested each wire but my readings are quite different than yours in the youtube video . You calling 4 to 5 per wire and less than 4 volts is bad . I came up with 9.9 6.2 12.5 did I do something wrong and have you ever seen this
 

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Imagine one of the wires is "A". Doesn't matter which yellow wire. One is "B" and one is ":C." Now put one meter probe on A and the other probe on B. At 3000 RPM you should see around 50 volts AC. No probes on battery!! . Check A to B. B to C and A to C. should see 50 or so volts at 3,000 on all 3 legs.
 

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Try this Gary:

Stator Test

1- First, put the bike on the centerstand. Cut the wires on both sides of the stator connector plug. Strip the insulation aprox. 1/2"-1" back on all three yellow wires. Label each wire A, B, and C.

2- With a multimeter, digital or analog, set to read resistance, check each leg to ground for short's. If no short's are found, (o resistance), you're good to go so far.

3- With the meter set to read resistance, check across each leg. A to B, B to C, then C to A. The reading's should be about 3 ohm's. If you read infinite resistance across any of the legs you have an open winding and the stator is bad. If they read good, keep going.

4- A helper is good to have for this next step. With the battery fully charged and the three yellow wire's separated so they cannot make contact, crank the bike. Have your helper rev the bike to 3000rpm after the bike warm's up.

IMPORTANT!!!

You are checking for AC voltage NOT DC voltage!! Make sure the meter is set to read a minimum of 120vac!!

With the bike at 3000rpm, check leg A to B. Note the voltage.
Then check leg B to C. Note the voltage.
Finaly check leg C to A. Note the voltage.

Compare the three readings. They should be between 50-70vac plus or minus about 5vac per leg. If they read good, chances are you've got a bad regulator."
 

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I’m checking the stator on a 1985 aspencade I unplugaged the 3 yellows and set my multimeter to ac 200 v and hooked my ground to battery and tested each wire but my readings are quite different than yours in the youtube video . You calling 4 to 5 per wire and less than 4 volts is bad . I came up with 9.9 6.2 12.5 did I do something wrong and have you ever seen this
There are 2 ways to test the stator. The 4 and 5 are probably ohms if you are testing continuity rather than AC output.. Some do resistance and others check AC voltage. Either one or both should tell you what you need to know. If you find low voltage a resistance check might give you a clue what has failed. Usually makes no difference as it has to come out if it is bad unless you go with a Poorboy system. You must be testing the end that comes from the motor. Not the end from the bike. If the plug is melted hard wire and solder the wires together. There is no order when you solder and insulate them. That plug has a terrible reputation. Many suggest you hard wire even if it looks good. It is just a matter of time. :cool:

EDIT: Don and I must have been typing at the same time. :)
 

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A short add-on here Gary!! You don't HAVE to cut the connector off the three yellow wires but I normally recommend removing ALL the connectors in the charging circuit due to them possibly burning in the future once you get the charging system up to Snuff!!
 

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I’m checking the stator on a 1985 aspencade I unplugaged the 3 yellows and set my multimeter to ac 200 v and hooked my ground to battery and tested each wire but my readings are quite different than yours in the youtube video . You calling 4 to 5 per wire and less than 4 volts is bad . I came up with 9.9 6.2 12.5 did I do something wrong and have you ever seen this
If you are referring to the video Steve Saunders did 2 things are wrong, first you should have had the meter on DC, not that it matters as that test doesn't work anyway. I tried it myself on a known bad stator and it showed good by that test. Never tried it on a known good one.
 

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Here I go again! This is likely to be the 6th time I've described this extremely easy way of testing early Goldwing 3 phase alternators on here only to be totally ignored. And it is so simple and foolproof.

Get a regular everyday clamp meter and set it on AC amps, start and warm-up the bike so that it idles, put the clamp around each yellow wire in turn and run the motor up to 3K RPM's. If the results you get are within + or - 5% of each other, then that alternator is good. I think the last time I did it on a standard alternator it was about 50 amps or so.

The meter only measures the magnetic field created by the electricity flowing through the wire being tested at the time, it measures Amps only, nothing else, it does not care about Volts, Ohms or Watts, But Amps are the result of the Volts, Ohms and Watts.

Remember you are testing before the Regulator/rectifier, I say this because, yes, 50 Amps would blow the dogbone fuse, if they where DC Amps, which they are not. An example would be, it takes 25,000 AC Volts to run an average railroad locomotive, the same locomotive will run on 750 Volts DC, with the same Amps.

See, I've already gone on the defensive. Sorry about that!
 

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I've always wanted to check to see what the amperage measurement at the stator on mine so I could add that in to the Stator test I post. What was the amperage on the bike you tested chilidawg?
 

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The A/C amps will fluctuate depending on the State of Charge of the battery, and amount of Lights on the bike.

the important thing with an A/C ammeter, is that ALL 3 of the yellow wires show the same amount of current. If they do, that Stator is good.

.good thing I kept my Amprobe after I retired :)
 

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Here I go again! This is likely to be the 6th time I've described this extremely easy way of testing early Goldwing 3 phase alternators on here only to be totally ignored. And it is so simple and foolproof.

Get a regular everyday clamp meter and set it on AC amps, start and warm-up the bike so that it idles, put the clamp around each yellow wire in turn and run the motor up to 3K RPM's. If the results you get are within + or - 5% of each other, then that alternator is good. I think the last time I did it on a standard alternator it was about 50 amps or so.

The meter only measures the magnetic field created by the electricity flowing through the wire being tested at the time, it measures Amps only, nothing else, it does not care about Volts, Ohms or Watts, But Amps are the result of the Volts, Ohms and Watts.

Remember you are testing before the Regulator/rectifier, I say this because, yes, 50 Amps would blow the dogbone fuse, if they where DC Amps, which they are not. An example would be, it takes 25,000 AC Volts to run an average railroad locomotive, the same locomotive will run on 750 Volts DC, with the same Amps.

See, I've already gone on the defensive. Sorry about that!
I'm going to guess the reason they unplug and test the stator is because most mechanics have a volt ohm meter. Not all would have an inductive pickup ammeter. Just another way to test the same thing but you are right about it being easy.
 

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The A/C amps will fluctuate depending on the State of Charge of the battery, and amount of Lights on the bike.

the important thing with an A/C ammeter, is that ALL 3 of the yellow wires show the same amount of current. If they do, that Stator is good.

.good thing I kept my Amprobe after I retired :)
Almost said that as well John. Remember that the stator runs wild and the excess is shunted on the 1200. Of course RPM would change the current flow. :)
 

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About 50 or so, might have been nearer 60, on a standard OEM alternator, which I don't use anymore, now I'm all Randakk upgrade.

But my whole point is, this is a much easier test, especially for those with limited electrical knowledge who get confused with all the A-B, B-C & A-C Voltage stuff.

This test is totally foolproof.
 

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About 50 or so, might have been nearer 60, on a standard OEM alternator, which I don't use anymore, now I'm all Randakk upgrade.

But my whole point is, this is a much easier test, especially for those with limited electrical knowledge who get confused with all the A-B, B-C & A-C Voltage stuff.

This test is totally foolproof.
I totally agree with this, it is so fool proof, even a backyard mechanic can do it and not know what he is really measuring.
 

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(y)That would be me! Backyard mechanic describes me perfectly.
:)
 

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Well that as far as Goldwing's are concerned, and 2 million sq/ft Houston skyscraper maintenance manager.

Let's pass this $#!t on. people need to know!

Word to admin. Why is there no facility to edit posts with this new format?
 

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Word to admin. Why is there no facility to edit posts with this new format?
There is. Click on the 3 dots at the top of the post and a drop down menu appears, click edit.
Didn't mean to step on you Mike, just didn't see your post before I replied.
 

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The A/C amps will fluctuate depending on the State of Charge of the battery, and amount of Lights on the bike.
Not on the stator system, it puts out full amps all the time RPM dependent.
 

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About 50 or so, might have been nearer 60, on a standard OEM alternator, which I don't use anymore, now I'm all Randakk upgrade.

But my whole point is, this is a much easier test, especially for those with limited electrical knowledge who get confused with all the A-B, B-C & A-C Voltage stuff.

This test is totally foolproof.
Quit being so Defensive Ya "Cheeky Plonker"!!!!!! :D It IS an easier test! I was just wanting a bit more info about yer readings!! I have a clamp type amprobe that doubles as a multimeter that I bought about 10 years ago from Lowes and it's been a good one that I still use at work. Not too bad of a price at about $80.00 I believe and they had less expensive models in stock but with fewer functions.... The only thing I disagree with ya on is yer statement that Amps are the result of the Volts, Ohms and Watts. That's not quite correct but we'll discuss that later....

Good Job!!
 

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I sometimes, make statements with 'alternators in mind' when referring to STATORS which I know for a fact, run WIDE OPEN period... something has to absorb all that energy, or the voltage will exceed the Eiffel Tower..... :)

So, assuming, the Regulator is working properly, and the engine is turning 3,000 RPM or more, it should put out 50-60ish amps regardless of light load.... the Regular is shunting the excess to ground.

That high amperage rate, is what is burning up those little white connectors on the yellow wires.

thanx to all for curbing my night time sputterings.
 

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The cheaper the better, high dollar ones only have stuff you don't need for this like DC Amps, Ohms and such.
 
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