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Both hands go numb. I commute ~50 miles each way to work on the highway. I have tried high and low handlebar positions. I use my throttlelock on the highway so I can drop my hands and get them circulating again. I probably have signs of carpal tunnel, but does anyone have any suggestions as to what is the best (preferred) position of the hands for long rides? Just curious to hear the wisdom of other riders. Thanks!
 

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I have the exact same problem here. My thoughts are it's not the vibration, but poor blood circulation in the hands from gripping the grips. I'd love to find a solution as well.

Raymond
 

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What about trying some different grips or some different gloves. I realized that the gloves that I use did not grip very well which caused me to squeeze the handle harder. On my Gl500 silverwing it has the original grips (plain rubber and smaller) which I like alot better. They seem to grip the leather gloves alot better. The PO of my 84I put the thick foam grips on it - don't like these especially with my riding gloves. They are alot bigger around and don't grip my riding gloves. I find myself gripping harder than I normally would. I'm looking for some different grips. Maybe also try a throttle lock or something to allow you to rest your grip going down the road.

Ken
 

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I ride 60 miles one way to work. When I first got my bike, the guy I bought it from highly recommended that I get a set of Kuryakyn grips, at about $50 US. I balked, saying that the price seemed a bit steep.

Well, after about two months I decided I should try it, because my hands would go from numb (about 50 miles or so), to stinging like crazy once I got to work. I bought the Kuryakyns, installed them, and immediately noticed the difference. I just couldn't believe the difference between riding with stock grips and the Kurys. Best purchase I could have ever made, and wish I'd done it sooner. A breeze to install, and they look sweet, too!

Here's a shot of the bike (after Kurys, before painting):
 

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I haven't used those Kurys, butI have used foam gripps on my gl1100 years ago. Big improvement and no more numb hands.
 

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Do you find that the trottle hand is worse for the numbness?, if so I would think it is your grip being too tight. I sometimes suffer this, but it is especially bad when riding the CBR1000, which has a much worse riding position. Could also be something to do with gloves and/or cuffs too tight, if I get the velcro on my jacket pulled too tight, that makes matters worse. I sometimes get neck ache on journeys and when I notice it, I reolise that I am quite tense in the shoulder and arm, forcing myself torelax aleviates it,but it creeps in again asI forget.

It is a shame, because in all other respects I find the wing so comfortable.

Pete
 

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usually "numbness" is caused by compression of a nerve. Carpal tunnel compresses the median nerve which supplies the thumb , 2nd and third finger. The Ulnar nerve (the one we call the funny bone if you hit your elbow) affects the fourth and fifth fingers. it can be compressed at the elbow, or at the wrist as well.

Usually this problem is related more to hand position. hand cocked to the fifth finger side will compress the ulnar nerve. hands flexed (like holding a handle bar grip) can compress the median and ulnar nerve.

unfortunately it is a very common problem with the positioning of motorcycle grips and the shape of the handle bars and is not relieved by moving the bar forward or back.
 

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jsmith24 wrote:
I ride 60 miles one way to work. When I first got my bike, the guy I bought it from highly recommended that I get a set of Kuryakyn grips, at about $50 US. I balked, saying that the price seemed a bit steep.

Well, after about two months I decided I should try it, because my hands would go from numb (about 50 miles or so), to stinging like crazy once I got to work. I bought the Kuryakyns, installed them, and immediately noticed the difference. I just couldn't believe the difference between riding with stock grips and the Kurys. Best purchase I could have ever made, and wish I'd done it sooner. A breeze to install, and they look sweet, too!

Here's a shot of the bike (after Kurys, before painting):
I have got the Kuryakyns also and they helped my numbness problem a great deal but did not totally solve. I can live with it much easier. I had one 530 mile (non-intrastate) day recently without any great problem
 

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Sounds like we're all getting up there in years, I suffer as well usually only throttle hand...I just use the cruise control as much as possible.

I find it's from hand arm position, a little stretching and exercise seem to help.
 

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I will have to add that I don't normally suffer from any sort of hand/wrist ailment or numbness, so my experience may not be the best example. Also, after reading the other posts here, I've recalled that it was just after the new grips that I got my VistaCruise to work properly, and if nothing else, that really helps reduce the "wrist pump" phenomenon associated with long trips. I didn't really notice before how often I was unconsciously twisting the thottle to keep it at the same speed.

Jack
 

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My GL1100 had those large diameter foam grips. I was on a long ride when I decided to try something different. I stopped at a motorcycle dealer and bought a set of cheap rubber grips with a much smaller diameter. I changed them in the parking lot. This made the tired/numbness problem much less for me. I have size large hands but still didn't like the larger diameter grips.
 

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jsmith24 wrote:
I ride 60 miles one way to work. When I first got my bike, the guy I bought it from highly recommended that I get a set of Kuryakyn grips, at about $50 US. I balked, saying that the price seemed a bit steep.

Well, after about two months I decided I should try it, because my hands would go from numb (about 50 miles or so), to stinging like crazy once I got to work. I bought the Kuryakyns, installed them, and immediately noticed the difference. I just couldn't believe the difference between riding with stock grips and the Kurys. Best purchase I could have ever made, and wish I'd done it sooner. A breeze to install, and they look sweet, too!

Here's a shot of the bike (after Kurys, before painting):
Ditto what he said
 

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The Kuryakyn grips helped me, if you watch on ebay you can sometimes find them for $39, that is what I paid, they make a lot of difference.:)



:12red::cool:
 

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I've had both the cheap foam grips and the ISO grips. For me it isn't so much a problem of the bike's grip but mine. It takes a while to learn to relax the shoulders and elbows and to keep a light grip on the handlebars. Palm rests on the grips help and I use the cruise as much as possible. After experimenting with the handlebars I find the lower positioning is better for me, it keeps my wrist straighter. On trips I've gone for over 400 miles and with the lower handlebar and training myself to keep the arms and shoulders relaxed, with a light grip on the bars I no longer have the problems I used to. On lighttraffic roads I often keep one hand or the other in my lap for a bit of a rest, of course you need a cruise or throttle clamp to rest the right hand. I also like a rest stop every 75-100 miles, the old knees tend to take a bit of a set.
 

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Paul.... you are older than me and I stop more often LOL... bet it is just the BPH thing on my part...

but yes, being able to take the hands off the grips does relive the pressure on the nerves... of course, then you get those wonderfull pins and needles feeling....

of course, we all know that deer alerts solves this problem too roflmao
 

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exavid wrote:
I've had both the cheap foam grips and the ISO grips. For me it isn't so much a problem of the bike's grip but mine. It takes a while to learn to relax the shoulders and elbows and to keep a light grip on the handlebars. Palm rests on the grips help and I use the cruise as much as possible. After experimenting with the handlebars I find the lower positioning is better for me, it keeps my wrist straighter. On trips I've gone for over 400 miles and with the lower handlebar and training myself to keep the arms and shoulders relaxed, with a light grip on the bars I no longer have the problems I used to. On lighttraffic roads I often keep one hand or the other in my lap for a bit of a rest, of course you need a cruise or throttle clamp to rest the right hand. I also like a rest stop every 75-100 miles, the old knees tend to take a bit of a set.

Paul has a good point about training yourself to relax arms and shoulders. You can ride longer and be more comfortable by doing this when the roads and traffic permit.:grinner:
 

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I give up, I've been telling you guys that deer whistles are just a myth since everyone who's anyone knows deer can't pucker their lips. Now if they had a mirror to practice with like Silverfox used to achieve his physical abilities it might be possible.
 

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I saw a guy onthe interstate hiway one timeleaning back ona sissy bar with his arms crossed, stearing with his feet. Not sure how he worked the throttle.
 

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I have the same problem due to arthritis in both wrists. The original owner of my bike had such problems that he sold the bike. I found that not wrapping my thumb around the grip all the time helps. That and cruise control.
 
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