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I know I was warned to solder the 3 yellow wires together on my 84 Aspencade but I have been so busy at work and not riding much so this PM I had a chance to look at the connector. The back wire showed a little discolorization but the connector looked good. Got it out and the wire before the connector and after the connector were discolored. I am gong to have to put in a length of wire to join them. Does anyone know the gauge of the wires? I am not that great at it but I am going to give it a try. I assume that you have to make sure you match each wire up or is it not necessaary since they are all yellow? I hope I haven't hurt anything. I guess I need to have a greater sense of urgency when I get good advice. My bad but hopefully not too bad.
 

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Just did mine about 10 days ago. My connector looked a bit cooked like yours. I also had to solder in a short length of wire on each one. I used 10 gauge wire. The stator wires, I believe, are 12 gauge, but there should be no harm in using a slightly larger gauge wire. It passes current with less resistance, and for me at least, was easier to work with. Be sure to double shrink wrap each wire and it doesn't hurt to wrap with a good automotive grade hi-temp electrical tape. I recall from a recent post on this forum that the stator is not wired in phase, so you don't necessarily have to match wire for wire, but I labled the wires on each side of the connector so that I could match them up after cutting out the connector. Not necessary, apparently, but it was one less concern in the unlikely event that it could cause a problem. I will ultimately install one of the two wiring harnesses currently available for the GL1200, but in the meantime, my 85 Aspy runs great with no charging problems from the stator.

TDS
 

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The yellow wires carry 3 phase AC so you can mix them up without any problem. I think the stock wire is 16 ga. but from what I read, nost people use 14 ga. Besides the connector by the battery, there is another connector by the rectifier. My '85 had a burned connection there that couldn't be seen until it was unplugged. Be sure to cut back to clean wire for the solder joint, and be sure the connection "takes" the solder. If only part of the joint takes solder you will surely have future problems.
 

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The guys are telling it right. Cut it back to shiny wire, use a crimp connector either a bare one or a insulated one with the plastic sleeve cut off and then solder. This will give a smoother and less bulky connection than twisted. Also will be a little lower in resistance. Make sure you slip some heat shrink tubing over the wire before joining and keep it far enough away so it doesn't shrink before it's slid into place. As far as hooking them up, mix and match. #12 or 14 is plenty large.
 

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hockeydad33,

You can mix the yellow wires up. It doesn't matter. As for wire size, use a copper stranded 10 gauge wire. Make sure you put heat shrink on all connections SEPARATELY to make sure they don't short together! I would use heat shrink instead of electrical tape because tape can unravel when it gets hot. Then bundle them all together with plastic wire loom or something.

It takes a pretty hot iron to solder those big wires. You can get a 90 watt gun at Wal-Mart fairly cheap but you may want to go bigger ifit's not to much money. Just be patient and take your time. Flux helps also.

Sounds like you caughtbefore it had a meltdown. Thats good! When I finally got around to looking at mine, the plastic connector was melted and the wires were only separated by melted plastic and luck.

Bob :11grey:
 

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Thanks so much for the quick replies. Hopefully I can get this done tomorrow after work and before the daughter's soccer game. You guys are really awesome. Can't thank you enough for your patience and help. :clapper:THX Randy
 

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Well, got the wires soldered this afternoon after work. Now, is there a way to make sure I did it right without an volt meter? Like does it not run or does the battery die? I tried my best to folow the direction to a T. How do I check the wires at the rectifier. Can't see where the wires lead to. Thx again for the help. Randy



PS How do you install a volt meter? Hard? Thx
 

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I found a small LCD unit a Radio Shack that shows voltage and either temperature or time.
The item number is 63-1039. It was $10 but our local store had it as a clearance item.
I will get a picture of it as I installed it and post it tomorrow.
 

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Fire it up. If the headlight brightens up a bit it's okay. If your battery is all the way up you might not see the headlight brighten so just run it awhile. It's pretty hard to go wrong on that repair. Installing a voltmeter is pretty easy, find one, mount it, and connect near as you can to anything that operates when the key is on, connect the other wire (-) to a good ground. That way it won't run the battery down. There are more complicated ways that might be very slightly more accurate, but what you're really after is changes so lab accuracy isn't necessary. If the meter you buy has a third terminal for a light, just tie it to the (+) lead of the meter that goes to the ignition switch, headlamp, running light or whatever you connect it to.

BTW using the term "Oh Crap" was copyrighted by me in my famous book on how to talk to recalcitrant machinery and inanimate objects just after they installed Mount Rainier. I won't sue this time...
 

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exavid, so sorry about violating your copyright, very kind of you not to sue. I will be more careful in the future. LOL Seriously, thanks all for the help. Just got back from a ride in the dark. Lights seemed fine, dimmed some at idle when the brake was held on. Rode for about 20 - 30 minutes and everything seemed fine. Next step will be a volt meter. Can that be hooked up through the fuse box if I can find an empty slot? Are all fused items switched? I can't say it enough, I appreciate everybody'shelp and patience, I am not the most mechanically adept person and I can get intimidated easily when I don't know what I am doing. ust ask the co-pilot, she will more than agree.
 

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hockeydad33,

Good job!:clapper: Glad everythingwent wellfor you. As long as you wrapped the connections separately so they can't short together or toground, everything will be fine.

You said you are mechanically inept and easily intimidated when you don't know what you are doing. At least you are willing to try!:weightlifter: As long as you are willing to give it a shot there will be members here who are willing to help, and don't worry about messing up once in a while. We all (most of us anyway) do. :gunhead:

You can hook a volt meter up off the fuse box. Just make sure it is a fuse that doesn't get any power until the key is turned on. If you use a source that is always hot, the meter will slowly drain the battery. :(

Bob :11grey:
 

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hockeydad33 wrote:
Next step will be a volt meter. Can that be hooked up through the fuse box if I can find an empty slot? Are all fused items switched? I can't say it enough, I appreciate everybody'shelp and patience, I am not the most mechanically adept person and I can get intimidated easily when I don't know what I am doing. ust ask the co-pilot, she will more than agree.
hockeydad33, you don't need an empty slot in the fuse box. If you look closely at the front of the fuse box (under the top plastic cover) there will be 2 shinny screws, one marked (+) & one marked (-). Just install your voltmeter then run the voltmeter's (+) wire to the (+) screw & run the voltmeter's (-) wire to the (-) screw. To be safe use a 2 or 3 amp fuse in the (+) voltmeter wire.

A more accurate way is to wire the voltmeter directly to the battery's (+) & (-) posts then use a micro relay in the (+) wire powered form those same 2 shinny screws to fire off the relay (that will tell true battery voltage) but most people just wire the voltmeter to the fuse box as that will read within a few tenthsof a volt of the true battery voltage.

Twisty
 

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It's not really necessary to connect directly to the battery, once you have the voltmeter hooked however you do it, you can measure the battery voltage with an accurate meter and compare it to the installed voltmeter. The differential between the two meters will alway be about the same so you can add the difference mentally any time to get the actual voltage at the battery.

The main point of having a meter isn't accuracy, it's there to see changes in the system.
 

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I have to do a thorough search first of this site for more info, but the 1985 Wing I bought last fall has bad stator wiring. The connector for one of the wires is blackened, which may be because of an electrical overload (the bike has a trailer with several lights). The connector was very brittle as was the wiring, so I just tugged on it a little and the wiring broke right off. The connector was NOT melted, however. That wire is badly corroded. The other two stator wires seem undamaged.

I think the solution is to cut back the corroded wire and rebuild it, then solder it.I'll ispect each wire and make sure that the other two are okay and repair as necessary.

A Wing owner I met from this site lives near me and has offered to help me. I'm sure we'll figure it out. I just wondered if anyone had any advice based on the above info. I'll search this site for more info in the meantime.
 

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Cut the wires back till you find good copper, then solder them together. My bet is your problem will be fixed. Those wires should be able to handle max. output OK.

Good luck!
 

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Before you do the soldering, do the stator test (Twisty has posted a very good procedure several times on this forum) for piece-of-mind. Do this before the soldering, because it requires the wires to be disconnected for part of the test. If you don't feel comfortable with the soldering, get a friend to help.

I could be a bit more helpful - try this link: http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/view_topic.php?id=5498
 

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exavid,
Yes, but back east, your "Oh Crap" translated into my "Woo Hoo". So Oh Crap still means something different here.
Don't be confusing the kids over your Copyright.
 

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A suggestion to both hockeydad33 and all the folks back in The East.
Take some fibre in your food, everyday.
It will remove the Oh before The Crap.:cheeky1:
 

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I have to do a thorough search first of this site for more info, but the 1985 Wing I bought last fall has bad stator wiring. The connector for one of the wires is blackened, which may be because of an electrical overload (the bike has a trailer with several lights). The connector was very brittle as was the wiring, so I just tugged on it a little and the wiring broke right off. The connector was NOT melted, however. That wire is badly corroded. The other two stator wires seem undamaged.
The single bad wire tells me that the 3 ph alt was under non-balanced conditions. For this alternator that could be bad news, but you need to verify that the problem was after the alternator. The 3 wires could simply be in different stages of decay and you may have to replace all of them, so check each as far back to the alternator as possible. All 3 leads must be supple, not tarnished and the insulation in good non brittle condition. Each leg, if to be replaced can be replaced with GTF #14-or #12 multi strand wire or an auto type wire good for at least 100C and oil. If you need to replace all the way back then do so and install a high temp loom covering and mount the cable set as far from heat sources and keep them snug to keep vibration to a minimum. Where you solder at the alternator can be looped to keep the solder joint from stress and vibration. Use resin core solder, and a heated up iron and some resin flux. Good clean heated conditions and then a clean insulation, as a heat shrink, are fine but do not heat the shrink too hot to create other problems. A Western Union Splice is admirable but you may not have the room to twist, so as Twisty and Exavid have said, a good cleanand non insulated butt joint is OK, but be careful in crimping. Do not over do the crimp, but be sure to tin the wires prior to soldering them to the crimp. Place all 6 wires in their respective crimpable butt connector, then with a hot iron, solder with flux in side the wire solder and some solder paste of resin, make up all joints and solder them all at the same time. BE SURE TO HAVE THE SHRINKS ON THE WIRES SO YOU CAN SLIDE THEM IN PLACE AND THEN HEAT UP WITH A PROPANE, BUTANE TORCH. Just enough heat to shrink the wrap. When all is cooled down:

Try to remove the shrink wrap by moving the shrunk insulation . If it moves back and forth on the wire, redo it. Also be well advised to do all 3 joints in different places so you do not end up with all 3 joints at the same location and end up with a big ball of 3 shrink wraps.

When testing the wires 1: Test for all three separately to a good clean ground, should get an open, the infinity sign or "OR" out of Range, or "OL". On an analog meter the needle swings to the highest area showing lots of ohms or resistance. All three leads are done individually and keep your hands off the bare wire since the human body will conduct at higher ranges and confuse you. If you get any ohmage number, you may be reading you. In theory this number should read as high as possible. 2: To test the windings, you will get a small ohmage number 1-3 ohms. Again be careful with the handling, the important thing is that each winding must be equal. Take the readings as quickly and as carefully as possible because the warming up of these windings will change the ohmage numbers. So make sure enough time has elapsed since you did all the soldering.

The process is easy, but requires finesse, no cold soldered joints, so be sure the solder flows, becomes shiny and then cools to a duller sheen, remove the heat. Heat the wire place solder on it, let it melt, wipe it clean with a clean rag and there you have it a tinned piece of copper ready to be placed withing the butt joint. Tin both wires , heat up the one wire and the butt joint, when both are hot the solid solder melts, while melted push together, keep from moving, removed heat source and the joint will solidify, let it cool and do the other end. You may need a cloth soaked in water to cool the already soldered end. Be fast, be sure both surfaces are hot, always check each soldered joint for continuity and that it is a good joint. You may want to do a trial run on spare wire and butts.--Good luck.
 
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