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Discussion Starter #21
I am careful to always clean the dust and grass from the engine top carefully.
and I always check Oil Level for every mowing session.


this engine has a horizontal oil filter on it.... I have replaced the drain valve with a 3 inch extension nipple and a 1/4 turn ball valve. the OEM valve was a recipe for burned hands, so I got rid of it fast. It was also too short and oil dribbled all over the block and frame. no more, I just put the mower on a slanted berm, and open the valve and it clears the frame and into the drain pan.


the old oil is used to start fires out on the south side, old cardboard boxes, fallen tree limbs, etc.
 

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I have been using 10W-30 in my lawn tractors for many, many years with no ill effects. My push mowers......................... Well considering most of them came out of trash piles or I paid five or ten bucks for each I put in them whatever I have laying around. Usually 15W-40 since I have so many diesels. I have been known to use used oil in them. I have also been known to not change the oil in them for years and I have never had one blow up or seize. They usually succumb to a blade to stump impact that bends the crankshaft. And yes I do still run them after that as long as they don't vibrate so bad that my hands go numb. I have been known to grind off part of the blade to get a little balance back in the bent crank to eliminate the vibration. Am I cheap? Damn right I am!!
I have had good luck in "straigtening" the crankshaft on many off those small movers .
I just lay the mover on the side , rotate the blade (remember to remove the cable from the sparkplug) to deside where to hit the blade holder with a BIG hammer , rotate for control and maybe hit it again .
Yes i am cheap:smile2:
 

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Oh yea, I ALWAYS try that before scrapping the mower. I usually get a couple straightenings out of it before it gets so bad it is hitting the case.:laugh: I had a Jacobson self propelled push mower that had a bent crank and I used it for years. One summer I decided to check the oil, I never changed it, just added sometimes. There was nothing in it! The thing was dry in the hole!!! I have no idea how long it was running without oil but it had to be a couple months since there was no evidence of oil at all. I putt a full load of whatever I had laying around in it and it ran great for another year before finally puking out the lower seal and it would not hold oil at all. I thought about just running it until it seized but somehow I felt sorry for it and figured it deserved to die a proper death. It finally went to the scrapyard. Sometimes I think, at least with the small engine, that the worse you treat them the longer they last!
 

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If you have a filter, you should be using detergent oil. The detergents keep the dirt in suspension so it can be filtered out. No filter, use non-detergent, the crud will settle to the bottom of the sump, to be drained when changed. You just have to change it more often. Older engines relied on lead in the fuel to lubricate valve guides. A little oil in the gas will help the intakes, but does nothing for the exhaust. (The one that needs it the most). If the engine is worn, there will be plenty of oil getting into the guides, no no worries. It is only a tight engine where this could be an issue. New engines have changed guide materials and clearances for unleaded fuels. Someday new small engines will be made to handle ethanol, but that hasn't happened, yet. It's not hard to get 3000+ hours out of a current small engine with a modicum of maintenance. We have some that are still going strong at 5000+ hours. That they run virtually everyday is a big factor, too. Sitting around is not ideal.
 

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If you have a filter, you should be using detergent oil. The detergents keep the dirt in suspension so it can be filtered out. No filter, use non-detergent, the crud will settle to the bottom of the sump, to be drained when changed. You just have to change it more often. Older engines relied on lead in the fuel to lubricate valve guides. A little oil in the gas will help the intakes, but does nothing for the exhaust. (The one that needs it the most). If the engine is worn, there will be plenty of oil getting into the guides, no no worries. It is only a tight engine where this could be an issue. New engines have changed guide materials and clearances for unleaded fuels. Someday new small engines will be made to handle ethanol, but that hasn't happened, yet. It's not hard to get 3000+ hours out of a current small engine with a modicum of maintenance. We have some that are still going strong at 5000+ hours. That they run virtually everyday is a big factor, too. Sitting around is not ideal.
Actually the lead in gas was for the valve seats, not the guides. Hardened seats took care of that problem.
 

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Yes, the lead did lubricate between the exhaust valve and seat preventing seat erosion, but it was also the primary lubrication between the exhaust valve and guide. A layer of lead oxide would plate most of the hot portion of the exhaust valve. This worked fine with cast iron guides, but without leaded fuel the guides would wear quickly. Bronze as well as other guide materials was the primary fix for that. Most guides today are a stintered powdered metal product with a blend of materials.
 

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I just rebuilt a Craftsman Chipper/shredder with a 5 HP B&S Industrial Motor. It’s states specifically in the owner’s manual to use 30w oil. It also states that using blended oil is acceptable, but will cause oil loss.

I researched this further and I found out that the blended oils, 10w30 or 40 or whatever, add polymers to bond the varied oil weights and the polymers can break down.

Bottom line, a single weight oil, chosen for conditions, is always better. We lazy Americans want a single oil, and want to forget about it for too long a time. I’m reading here that some of you even want to carry just one oil for all of your vehicles!

I used Rotella 15-40 diesel oil in my ‘84 GL for years, when I lived in Austin and commuted with it during summer months. I also own an ‘03 Dodge Ram Cummins and have used that oil for 15 years. Now I live where that oil would be too thick most of the year, and I ride 12 months a year.

I never bought into the Mobil-1 perfect oil, marketing campaign. However, now I have 4 great street bikes, and I work hard to keep these running well without assistance of dealerships.

So, synthetic oil does have an advantage, when you want to just let it sit in an engine for 6 months at a time.

The last 2-3 years I have put AMSOIL 10-W40 in my GL1200. I changed my oil last time in Aug 2018. I only put about 1k miles on my GL since. I checked the oil today and it’s clean, like when I poured it in 8 months ago. The dipstick looks and smells like the oil was just changed!

I think these “improved” oils are viable for these kind of uses. When I drive a car or truck hard, lots of miles, 8-10K between changes, 2-3 times a year, I use an old-fashioned petroleum based oil and change oil often.

Keep in mind, when you own a GL1200 or other motor built 30+ years ago, there were no synthetics and they ran fine as engineered.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
I double checked the old oil jugs in the shop, and sure enough, they are all Non-Detergent 30w.


and the Manual says to use Detergent 30W oil.

well, I can't find any around here at all. Walmart quit carrying it, they have "30W non-detergent" oil for "lawnmowers".


I just gave it up, and bought a jug of Rotella T4 15w40 and will drain the oil later today, and give it the T4 and a new filter. Going to have to watch that real close, as I now know that I have been using the "wrong oil" for 515 hours of use over the last 7 years.


I will run it 20-25 hours, and change it out without fail.


My Suburban's GM recommendation is 5w30 which I am using sometimes,
5w40 was the last jug that I bought in Savannah, GA and was all the store had.
Never, ever, saw an auto store that only carried one weight of oil like that??


Now that all this discussion has been going on, I am wondering if the oil soak bottom side of the motor is a result of folks having used a heavier weight oil than GM prescribed?


the oil pressure gauge seems to stay at about 35 to 45 most of the time.


When I first bought the truck 2 years ago, it carried 60 psi.... and I thought, "uh, what is going on here?" this is not a diesel engine....


I switched it to 5w30 and the pressure fell back in line of about 40-45 depending on the weather.
 

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I haven't seen a non detergent oil in many years. Didin't think anyone even made it anymore. In a lawn mower I just use whatever oil is handy, they usually die of something besides oil related failure anyway.
 

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My B&S motor asks for detergent 30w too, but like what Dave said... When it was time to fill it, I found an old qt of Yamalub 20w40 on my shelf. I figured that will do until my next change.

Just went on Amazon and you can buy a 48 oz jug of B&S branded 30w detergent motor oil for $8 shipped Prime. I just ordered one for my next oil change.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
My B&S motor asks for detergent 30w too, but like what Dave said... When it was time to fill it, I found an old qt of Yamalub 20w40 on my shelf. I figured that will do until my next change.

Just went on Amazon and you can buy a 48 oz jug of B&S branded 30w detergent motor oil for $8 shipped Prime. I just ordered one for my next oil change.

Walmart had a red jug branded B&S small engine oil.


but there was no reference to weight or detergency, so I did not pick it up.
no price on it either...


oh well, the jug of T4 will only last about 3 mowings, I can get something else later if I choose to.


my local wally world has a piss poor manager, does not keep in tune with what is needed on the shelves.
 

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I had a ford motor rebuilt by a independent professional mechanic and I asked him what oil he recommended and he said I don’t care ,what matters I how often the drain plug comes out,that’s been 30 years ago so things may have changed now.
 

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I used T6 5w40 syn in my Honda EMi 5000 generator for years of cold winters in the mountains, have 6,100 hours on it with no ill effects. It uses more 30w I use during the hot summers than it uses of the 5w40. I also exclusively use T6 in my GL1200 for the last 60K miles. I know there are expert opinions about tolerances, oil ports, etc. for using recommended oils...but I don't argue with positive results. As for oil consumption, had a high mileage, high consumption beater caravan that needed an oil change and didn't have the 10w30 handy, so I threw in 5w20 and it stopped losing oil. Don't know why, don't care- it was a beater.
 

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I was in charge of heavy equipment at an excavating company. We used Shaffer synthetic, and sampled oil when we changed to the synthetic. We started with the most wore out POS we had, as an experiment. Our original program was to change at 250 hrs. Manufacturer suggested 500hr.
Test piece was a Komatsu 220-5 excavator that had 12k hrs on it .We sampled the oil that was what was equal to Rot T 15w40 at 250 hrs . Lab said it could run longer. We replaced oil with the synthethic. Ran it 250 hrs, tested again, lab said to run it another 250. At 500 hrs we tested again. Lab said to keep running it. At 750 hrs we chickened out and changed it, the lab said that the Base units where nearly depleted. I diesel engines , the fuel contains sulphur, when that goes by the rings, the base units neutralize the sulphur so that with condensation in the oil doesnt form sulphuric acid.
Since we used our most wore out piece, we determined that 750 hours was a safe interval. That cut our oil expense by 2/3. The rest of the fleet was changed to synthetic, and placed on the 750hr. schedule.
That Komatsu excavator was sold , still running fine with excess of 20k hrs.
I'm not here to praise any particular brand of oil, but if you can trust one to lube a $20,000 engine, in a crappy environment. You should trust it to work in your bike or mower. Just pay attention to the rating, make sure it exceeds what the engine manufacturer requires, and that the viscosity is correct for conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Since we used our most wore out piece, we determined that 750 hours was a safe interval. That cut our oil expense by 2/3. The rest of the fleet was changed to synthetic, and placed on the 750hr. schedule.


That Komatsu excavator was sold , still running fine with excess of 20k hrs.
I'm not here to praise any particular brand of oil, but if you can trust one to lube a $20,000 engine, in a crappy environment. You should trust it to work in your bike or mower. Just pay attention to the rating, make sure it exceeds what the engine manufacturer requires, and that the viscosity is correct for conditions.

750 hours at 40 mph overall average, Idling, etc, is 30,000 miles.


based on the 1st post, Blackstone labs said to run our car another 16,000 miles on the next change and sample it again..... I chickened out and it is being changed at roughly annual in December..... it is now almost May and it has not been changed yet....


I think your experience agrees very closely with what the lab told me to do.


My son, changes the oil filter on his Cummins engine every six months, and runs the oil two years..... sometimes, that is a lot of miles...


on my 2001 Suburban at 212,000 miles, it is loosing about 1 qt every 2,000 miles, or less. Not sure exactly... I just keep topping it once in a while. It has 5w30 Mobil1 in it.... I am thinking to just change the filter on it, and just keep topping it off. We just bought the truck a year ago this month.
It runs like a top, steering is tight, transmission is perfect, pulls the 8,000 lb RV trailer quite well.


it is a 4x4 which is great for a heavy trailer that gets off pavement sometimes.
 

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750 hours at 40 mph overall average, Idling, etc, is 30,000 miles.


based on the 1st post, Blackstone labs said to run our car another 16,000 miles on the next change and sample it again..... I chickened out and it is being changed at roughly annual in December..... it is now almost May and it has not been changed yet....


I think your experience agrees very closely with what the lab told me to do.


My son, changes the oil filter on his Cummins engine every six months, and runs the oil two years..... sometimes, that is a lot of miles...


on my 2001 Suburban at 212,000 miles, it is loosing about 1 qt every 2,000 miles, or less. Not sure exactly... I just keep topping it once in a while. It has 5w30 Mobil1 in it.... I am thinking to just change the filter on it, and just keep topping it off. We just bought the truck a year ago this month.
It runs like a top, steering is tight, transmission is perfect, pulls the 8,000 lb RV trailer quite well.


it is a 4x4 which is great for a heavy trailer that gets off pavement sometimes.
John, chances are good that the oil is being lost through worn valve seals and guides. Just adding oil is the easy way out but in the long run you will end up putting on new catalytic converters since the burning oil will wipe them out. I would just replace the valve seals if you don't want to pull the heads and have the guides done.
 

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John, I have a Husqvarna also. Mine is a 2246. I usually get the 30w HD oil at walmart where the spark plugs and other small engine stuff is. They do sometimes not have any, so I buy it at Auto Zone. It costs more than a lot of the others though. Mine is about 3 years old with almost 130 hours on it. I mow about 2 acres, usually about once a week in the spring. I very seldom add any oil and change it every spring.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
John, chances are good that the oil is being lost through worn valve seals and guides. Just adding oil is the easy way out but in the long run you will end up putting on new catalytic converters since the burning oil will wipe them out. I would just replace the valve seals if you don't want to pull the heads and have the guides done.

REF: 2001 Suburban

I forgot to mention that the bottom of the engine is wet with oil.
all of the topside gaskets are new, I had the intake manifold pulled and new gaskets installed, they found the knock sensors were bad, and a mouse had chewed the wiring harness to them badly, so that was replaced.


The Catalytic Converters were removed and replaced with straight thru pipe, so that is not an issue.


The trucks runs fine, just not getting the MPG that it should, which I believe to be a problem with the O2 sensors are not out of calibration with the cats being removed. I looked at the expense of buying new cats, and said 'no' to that. No emissions tests where I live.
 

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John, I have a Husqvarna also. Mine is a 2246. I usually get the 30w HD oil at walmart where the spark plugs and other small engine stuff is. They do sometimes not have any, so I buy it at Auto Zone. It costs more than a lot of the others though. Mine is about 3 years old with almost 130 hours on it. I mow about 2 acres, usually about once a week in the spring. I very seldom add any oil and change it every spring.

for the 1st 300 hours, it did not use hardly any oil at all.
there is a gasket leak somewhere on the left side of the engine, it makes a horrible mess, so I just spray it off with the high pressure washer to keep the dirt from building up.



I have to lift the front of the mower up, so I can lay down and use the high pressure washer to clean the deck. If that is not done, the grass packs up solid until it hits the blades... when that happens, it won't cut grass anymore.


we have almost six acres, of which we mow about 3.5 acres.
the Husqvarna was purchased in the spring of 2012 and has 525 hours on it today. I replaced the OEM oil drain vavle with a long nipple and 1/4 turn Ball Valve. Hated that factory push/twist drain vavle, it burned my hands every time, not to mention the mess it makes



Bought a new mower lift this week, the old Harbor Freight piece of junk mower lift collapsed and damn near did me in. it was also a super PITA to store, once it is put together, it is Full Size all the time.....


the new one is a Mojack HDL500 which will collapse fully down to the width of the frame, about six inches. It will then hang on the wall out of the way a blessing for me.


it also has a rating of 500lbs with a very strong Anti-Drop locking mechanism.... jack it up a fraction, step on the lock release and let it down. None of that crap of falling on you like the HF did. ( the frame actually broke and it collapsed all at once )
 

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