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Which do you prefer and how often do you change

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Which Do you prefer?

You can vote for 2 items in the Poll.

I am putting on an aluminum one because thats what I took off, but I have several copper ones and neoprene washers also. Which is best, Better, OK?
 

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It aint rocket science
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Never did like the term crush washer, to me it implies a one shot usage which couldn't be further from the truth.

Close tolerance sealing washer, yeah.

The real killer of a sealing washer is over tightening of a fastener which is common. Another killer is dirt or debris left behind on surfaces causing distortion and scoring of the washer. Copper takes more of a beating and is very noticeable under those conditions.

You think the local quikie lube puts new washers on:) for their 19.88 dollar specials. (and how many oil changes do they do a year) They wouldn't give them away and if new were put on should be billable on the invoice.

BTW I will change one when needed and only with OEM type.
 

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Well, a couple of thoughts on this.

First, the nut should not be tightened so much that it crushes the washer. I fear the threads will be over stressed.

Tighten it enough to secure it real snug, and that washer should last 2 or 3 uses.

If I had them in the spare parts box, I would change it out every other time just for grins.
 

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You think the local quikie lube puts new washers on:) for their 19.88 dollar specials. (and how many oil changes do they do a year) They wouldn't give them away and if new were put on should be billable on the invoice.

And how many drain hole threads do they strip? A hell of a lot of them. I see them quite often. Oil pans are expensive and they would save money by replacing the washer every time with the correct one.

The more times you use it and the harder the washer is the more likely you are to strip the threads.
 

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Jobe...

You need to add 2 more options to your poll...

a) No washer preference.
b) As needed.

In my case I don't have a preference and I only change them as needed. I use copper and aluminum. :)

Tim.
 

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I remember hearing about one changer working with an Audi or BMW I think.

Drained the oil put 5 back in started it up and it was smoking like a banshee and wouldn't move.

He drained the transmission.:ROFL:
 

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I voted that the 'crush washer' needs to replaced each and every time…. because that's what it says in the Honda manual. There is a reason there is a torque value for the oil drain bolt… because it's supposed to have a new washer and the correct torque value is determined with a new washer.
I used to run a GoldWing speciality shop some years ago and 'yes' I did replace the crush washer every time I did an oil change. My techs were specifically instructed to replace the washer… each and every time. I made sure they were aware why it was required. It was simple enough…. look at a new Honda crush washer and a used washer. The difference is obvious.
Let the flames begin!
 

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I remember hearing about one changer working with an Audi or BMW I think.

Drained the oil put 5 back in started it up and it was smoking like a banshee and wouldn't move.

He drained the transmission.:ROFL:
That used to be a frequent thing with the early Honda cars. The trans drain plug was a lot more accessible than the engine plug and the engines only held about 2 1/2 quarts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Jobe...

You need to add 2 more options to your poll...

a) No washer preference.
b) As needed.

In my case I don't have a preference and I only change them as needed. I use copper and aluminum. :)

Tim.
Tim your right, I should have added no preference and as needed, I looked and I don't see anyway to modify the poll now.

I am surprised at the folks who do not consider these "Crush Washers"........... I should have added that to the Poll also but I thought it was obvious what they were for and how they got their name.
 

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I am surprised at the folks who do not consider these "Crush Washers"........... I should have added that to the Poll also but I thought it was obvious what they were for and how they got their name.
Nobody in the shops I was in ever called them crush washer.

When going to the parts window it was (Let me have 4 copper caliper washers or drain plug washer)

We knew what they did and when to replace.:?
 

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With the luck I have, if I didn't change it there would be a leak.
I also torque it a shy under what is called for in the service manual.
 

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For a few years Ford went with plastic washers on their drain plugs.

Very easy to spot an overused one, it would swell out beyond the hex head and make putting your wrench on difficult. There was a particular hex head which was very thin. 7/8 IIRC.:)

The cheapo plastic ones during that time would crack and leak.
 

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I have never changed mine on the 'Wing. Have yet to leak a drop, but will probably replace it soon. Kind of a 'rolling the odometer' thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I have never changed mine on the 'Wing. Have yet to leak a drop, but will probably replace it soon. Kind of a 'rolling the odometer' thing.
My impression of what the washer does is 2 fold. It does stop any leakage once the proper torque is applied. However more importantly, it is generally made of softer material that the threaded plug to offer the "Give" or "Crush" action to take the stress off the threads in the engine in this case, or the oil pan of a car. Once the washer material is "Crushed" it has no more give to it to offer this protection.
 

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My impression of what the washer does is 2 fold. It does stop any leakage once the proper torque is applied. However more importantly, it is generally made of softer material that the threaded plug to offer the "Give" or "Crush" action to take the stress off the threads in the engine in this case, or the oil pan of a car.
You are making that up. The primary function of a sealing washer when used in a fluid application is to seal, not as a lock washer or thread stress remover, whatever that is. If a fastener is in a high stress or critical situation the designer can change the thread percentage for the application.

It is evidenced by many types of materials used for that purpose including the plastic used on cars. Other fluid applications use cork or fibre sealing compounds, none of the above have anything to do with a thread stress reliever or locking situation.

They are all simply different designs to do the same thing and that is to prevent fluid leakage first and foremost.

What will happen over time is that the soft metal sealing washer will become distorted and will require more tightening torque to prevent leakage, then possibly resulting in damaged threads from over tightening.:)
 

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You can "refresh" a copper washer by heating it to cherry red with a propane torch, then quinching it in water. The same washer can be used many times this way and it works like a new one each time. That said...I see no reason to change one anyway unless there is a problem with seepage. Anyone who would over torque a drain plug probably shouldn't be working on their own machinery in the first place. :raspberry:
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
You are making that up. :)
I did start my sentence with "My Impression", your can be different.

I suspect the washer "Crushes" for more reasons than sealing, although sealing is the main reason for having a washer. But I would imagine that as the washer get tightened over and over, it gets thinner, harder and more tore up. The sealing capability has got to be diminished, and in order to achieve sealing, the proper torque would have to be exceeded. I guess one of the other questions I should have put in the Poll was "Who actually uses a torque wrench to tight the Oil Drain Bolt?

However the term "Crush washer" came about somehow, for a reason......... They make them out of different materials for a reason........ and the manufacturers recommend replacement ever oil change for a reason........ (Not that I do)
 

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You know...this is a non-issue.
It's not as if this is a super-expensive 'maybe I won't replace it because of cost' part.
Funny thing is how people will scrimp and nickel & dime over something so marginally inexpensive which can lead to leaks and stripped case threads. The latter will at the very least stain your garage floor...and at very worst be a very expensive yet avoidable repair.

Do three things and you can't go wrong:
Use the right parts...including a new crush washer;
Use the right tools...you can't go wrong with a torque wrench;
Follow the correct procedures.

‘nuff said.

Rob(in Hell)
 

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Jobe...

You need to add 2 more options to your poll...

a) No washer preference.
b) As needed.

I added to the poll so you can change your vote if you want.
 
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