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Hello,

I saw this web site, decided to join and I hope somebody will provide me with a little bit of their knowledge and experiences.

I recently purchased a 1978 GL1000 and have been replacing parts etc, for the past month or so. The bike runs and rides great and has no problems with one exception . . . a small oil leak from the timing covers after stopping the engine. Not much . . . just a few drops, then it stops. I have checked with a local shop and was told that oil does travel behind the covers and a split in one of the cover seals is the source of the oil loss. Based on a repair manual that I have the lubrication pathway does not include going through the timing cover area (at least from the diagram that I have seen). I suspect that an oil seal (most likely in a cylinder head) facing the timing belt arrangement is the culprit. The question is, does the timing cover seal have any oil retention responsibility or should I look at the other seals in the timing belt area? And, if the cylinder head is involved can I change the seal once the timing covers are removed without getting under the valve cover/s?

Any help with the questions will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks . . . Don
 

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DMOXLEYwelcome to the forum! :waving:

I don't have any experience on the 1000 but there aresome on this forum who do. I'm sure some one will be along with some advice for you!

Bob :11grey:
 

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I really don't believe the timing cover gasket has any other function than to keep the nasties OUT of your Wing. I don't have any first-hand knowledge of 1000/1100's, but the four cylinder lay-out is kinda generic in the GoldWing.

Keep watching your post, there are a lot of owners here with experience on that model. And you are very welcome to the friendliest GoldWing forum on the net. :gunhead:
 

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Some engine guru's will speak up, but all I can that could be the problem is the crank or camshaft seal has a small leak. And if that's the case, there a chance the oil is getting on the timing belts, and that's not good. Take the covers off and see if you can spot the source, shouldn't be too hard.

Raymond
 

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Most likely the problem is from one or both of the camshaft seals. They most likely became hard with age and are the source of the leak behind the belt covers. I was replacing the belt this past fall and noticed the puddling of oil on the camshft seal on the left side. It is an easy fix if you are replacing the belts. The only extra work is to remove the valve cover on the effected side, remove the belt pulley, remove the back plate and loosen the camshaft. Then slip off the old one and use a light grease on the new one that slides over the cam and reinstall. The cam sproket should be lined up on both sides (L & R) with the arrow marks while the crank is at "T1". The cams will need to be rotated back to the arrows as the lobes of cam will cause the cam to rotate when the belt is removed.

Not a difficult job but can be done with minimal mechanical aptitude within a couple of hours of time. While your at it now would be a good time to change the belts, coolant, thermostat and hoses if needed.

Good luck

Mark Gaeth

Decatur, IN
 

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Hi Don, the timing belt covers have no oil or water pathways behind them. The timing belts should remain dry. If there is oil behind the covers it is probably from one of the cam or crank shaft seals behind the timing belt pulleys. Since there is oil in that area, the timing belts are history. Keep us posted on what you find and ask lots of questions, that is what this great site is all about.
 

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I just had the exact same problem on my '84 GL1200. The crankshaft seal was the culprit. The seal itself was $10.00 or less, but I had to replace the gaskets because they were stretched out after removal....darn things only lasted 21 years! While I was in there I also replaced the timing belts: $12.50 each at NAPA. I think the GL100 belts are slightly more.
As everyone else said, there is no oil or coolant flow into that area, the gasket and covers are to keep stuff out.
 

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I am SO glad I saw this post. My 83 1100 hasa tiny (three or so drops) oil leak somewhere behind the timing belt housing, and I was worried about what it might be. I replaced the belts months ago, thinking like many people that there was oil inside and that would also fix my oil leak. Well, absolutely no oil inside, and I was a bit bummed.

Now, next time I have all day I can pull her apart and replace that seal. Heh...who knew? Not me anyway... :)

Jack
 

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The positive responses to my questions has provided a wealth of information. My thanks to all who have pointed me in the right direction to fix the problem. Taking the advise to get someother maintenance done during the repair, I'm off to NAPA and Service Honda for parts. One of the pleasures of owningthis bike has been towork on it . . . a greatstress reliever and it's a fun project. I'll keep you posted on my discoveries after pulling the covers, and, after the repair.

I hope at some point I can provide something back to the forum for somebody else who needs information.

Don
 

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Don,

Welcome! :waving:There's a wealth of knowledge flowing around here. Looks like the your question got answered rather promptly. :DThat seems to happen a lot around here!
 

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Welcome,

Since you are taking the good advice and doing the belt and hose service, you might as well remove the radiator as this will make the belt and seal job MUCH easier. The work can be done without radiator removal but in this case it would be best to remove it and clean/flush it. Remember to fill the cooling system with a silicate free coolant.
 

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I'm glad I read the answers to my questions once more. I realized that you mentioned that your oil leak was coming from the crankshaft oil seal. Given the age of my bike I'm inclined to renew all the seals (camshafts and crankshaft). Did you replace the seal yourself and if so, are there any tips you can pass on with regard to the installation of the crankshaft seal or was it pretty straight forward?

Thanks . . . Don
 

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Just had my belts changed and cam seal was leaking a little oil into the covers, while you have the covers off do belts seal and make sure to check your water pump. I found mine was on its last legs and one good trip might have been the last.
 

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jwinter75 wrote:
I just had the exact same problem on my '84 GL1200. The crankshaft seal was the culprit. The seal itself was $10.00 or less, but I had to replace the gaskets because they were stretched out after removal....darn things only lasted 21 years! While I was in there I also replaced the timing belts: $12.50 each at NAPA. I think the GL100 belts are slightly more.
As everyone else said, there is no oil or coolant flow into that area, the gasket and covers are to keep stuff out.

I'm glad I read the answers to my questions once more. I realized that a the oil leak was coming from a crankshaft oil seal in one response. Given the age of my bike ('78)I'm inclined to renew all the seals (camshafts and crankshaft).Are there any tips to passon with regard to the installation of the crankshaft seal or is itstraight forward?

Thanks . . . Don
 

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Pretty straight forward once you get the sprocket off. A Clymer manual will help a lot with this. Personally I wouldn't change any seal unless I had to pull it for other reasons or it was leaking. The reason is that seals are kinda funny things, some will work just fine forever and sometimes a new one fails early, so if it ain't broke don't fix it is my watchword with seals.
 

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exavid wrote:
Pretty straight forward once you get the sprocket off. A Clymer manual will help a lot with this. Personally I wouldn't change any seal unless I had to pull it for other reasons or it was leaking. The reason is that seals are kinda funny things, some will work just fine forever and sometimes a new one fails early, so if it ain't broke don't fix it is my watchword with seals.
Success . . . seals arrived and have been installed along with new hoses, clamps, thermostat, oil filter, belts, add-on dip stick (no, it doesn't leak), radiator cap and finally, some new hardware and painting. The end result so far . . . no leaks.

Thanks everybody for your help and comments.

Don
 

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So glad you were able to get the bike sorted out. It's really great to hear some success stories every now and then...
 
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