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I am doing some cleanup and getting the bike in shape for the next season, but would like to know if I could use a Synthetic 10W30 oil instead of the default oil types.

Since it would be a 10W30, viscosity wise it should not make a difference, but I do not know any other variable to consider. I would assume, that like any vehicle, it will have less breakdown and better viscosity characteristics, but maybe pressure buildup may not be the same, so it might show low oil pressure.



Anyone have any good ideas about this issue? :?



Thanks for your thoughts..... :clapper:
 

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It shouldn't have any effect on oil pressure with the same viscosity but you have to avoid any oil with the words "energy conserving" in the bottom of the little API circle on the back.
 

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its cold in ontario? so 10-30 is a good start
 

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My '82 1100 calls for 10w40 above15c and 20w under0c. I use 15/40wt year round and only have difficulty starting when it gets below 20f. Being these motors and transmissions share the same oil, shearing may be a factor if long oci's are the norm. personally I feel a 10/30 is too light for these bikes. If the motor is sound oil pressure shouldn't be an issue.,,
 

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i'm kinda new to this, i have an 84 gl1200a my question is along the same tack this string is going, i just got the bike and am changing out all fluids, i put a valvoline 10-40 synt. in as that was what the manual stated however on to the question is there a diffence between bike oil from the cycle shop and regular motor oil from any auto parts store?
thanks for the help
 

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Im not an expert but my take on that question is, Bike oil is designed to not interfere with the operation of your wet clutches and at the same time provide protection to all moving parts.

Avoid oils with friction modifiers because they might cause your clutches to slip!

I like high detergent diesel oils because they keep my engine clean, The lube value is there & they dont mess with my wet clutch system. alot of forum members use dello 400 from wal-mart because it works well, the wing shifts great & it offers good protection.

If you keep your oil clean by changing it at a 3000 mile mark, than your bike will shift smooth & should last a very long time!
 

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Most 'motorcycle' oils are designed to operate at unusually high temperatures in bikes with air cooled engines. Water cooled engines like those in the 'Wing don't run any hotter than a typical automobile engine. So just about any automotive oil will work fine. Avoiding 'energy conserving' or 'friction reducing' designations in the API donut logo on the container is a good idea. I don't know if there's been any real investigation whether those oils will actually cause clutch slippage but why take the chance? Synthetic oils will work fine in your bike but it's a waste of money in my opinion. If you change oil every 3-4 thousand miles it really won't be any benefit in the higher priced oil. I don't like extended intervals when using synthetic oil because even though the oil might be in good shape a longer change interval will allow more acids and other nasty combustion byproduct stuff to accumulate in the oil that can attack bearings and other precision surfaces in the engine. If you change oil with synthetic as you would with dino oil the only benefit is to the manufacturer of the synthetic. He sells more. It does keep your wallet thinner and perhaps more comfortable to sit on though.
 

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Backdoc,
You can get the good cold flow properties of a 5W and the operating temperatures protection of an SAE 40 if you go with the synthetic 5W40 "universal" (rated for API diesel and API gasoline categories for mixed fleets) oil. These oils will typically pass JASO MA friction test and have anti-wear additives at a higher level that gasoline only type products. I use the readily available Synth 5W40 API CJ-4 and API SM rated product. The change interval should stay the same, but the added cost is not much. Might save your starter some wear on cold days.
 

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Unless the 10-30 is MA labelled (the deisignation for Motorcycle specific oil). I would not put it in any bike with a wet clutch. Odds are very high it will have friction modefiers in it. I know if you go to a Honda bike dealer they have a 10-30 for motorcycles ( but it would be expensive ).

Stick with something in the 10-40 range for our climate. One thing I can't figure out is up here ( Canadian Tire ) they sell a Castrol 10-40 that says for motorcycle but has no MA designation.

I've used the Mobile 1 MA specific 10-40 but extremely expensive here at around $ 13.00 a litre. I currently use Suziki's 10-40 MA label oil that I buy at the Honda dealer for less than I can buy Castrol at Canadian Tire. I think the diesel oils mentioned are OK as lots use them.

Oil is a never ending topic with no real end in sight. Use what the manufacturer recommends.
 

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chris in va wrote:
What's wrong with factory Honda oil?:?
I don't belive Honda has a motor oil refinery nor does Suzuki Yamaha,kawasaki,Harley Davidson,Toyota ect.I have read many times they contract there name brand oils out to the major oil companies and charge more for the same oil you can get from Castrol or Shell.

Back in the mid 70s i had a Suzuki RE5 wankel motorcycle.The dealerssold a Suzukilabeled oil.But if you couldnt get that they said to use Shell Fire and Ice 10/40.That told me that they were contracting to Shell at the time.



A motorcycle specific oil has a different additive package these days.I can't recall all the extra things they put in but zinc and calcium are two of them.(sounds like multivitamin ingredients.

The extra zinc is for the cams.



I used regular synthetic in my suzuki gs1100 since new.It now has 93,+++ and still is going strong .I did experience slipping rarely in the frist 300 miles after an oil change.The clutch is original so the occasional slipping never did enough harm to warrant replacement.



For years i listened to old wives tales about synthetic oil.Amsoil and Mobil1 were the only two widely available for years.

No doubt these tales were started by the companies that only had there dinosludge to sell.

Now, everyonemarkets asynthetic or so called synthetic.Many companies take the dyno oil and run it through a machine that crushes the oil molecules to make them more uniform in size.Regular oil has inconsistant sized molecules.Once you run it thru the crusher it can now be called synthetic as it is now a man made finished prodect.

There is a case law on this.Mobil vs Castrol wherein Mobil corp thought Castrol's use of the crusher and calling it synthetic brought a law suit.

You know the outcome as many companies have the crusher and now market synthetics and charge a true synthetic price.

Its been a few years since i checked but Redline,Mobil 1 and Amsoil were the only true from the ground up synthetic motor oils ont this side of the pond.

Bottom Line is use what you want but try to get what you pay for.



Flatfour
 
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