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HI

I haven't torqued anything in years, just use common sense. I was reading about checking head bearing ect. and thought I might break out the old wrench and go through a few things. I have one where the bar bends and you read off the indicator, prior to the new clicker types. I can't imagine it loosing accuracy but maybe they do. Any thoughts on this ??

Thank you Tom
 

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I would have a lot more trust in that than in the clicker types that the spring wears out on. I still use the bar type. I have assembled hundreds of engines and will not use a clicker style on anything other than torqueing a wheel on a car.
 

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as log as the beam isnt bent out of true id use it .
 

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The only problem I have seen with these is when the the indicator stick comes loose and wobbles a few pounds either way. In this case just tighten it up with glue/centre punch or whatever seems appropriate, then make sure it points to zero at rest.

Its accuracy depends solely on the physical properties of the steel the bar is made of, and that doesn't change.
 

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Part of 'what's left of my job' is calibrating torque wrenches. I probably do over 500 a year. Even those old deflecting beam wrenches can loose accuracy over time by being knocked around or having things set on them from being stored in the bottom of the tool chest. I trust the newer snap action wrenches. They hold there accuracy very well for the most part. Those older wrenches like yours are also very accurate and can remain good for decades. Just to be sure, if it hasn't been used in a good long while, you might want to check it against another you know is good. To me it's scary torquing anything into these aluminum engines. Anyway, I would hate to see you over torque something and regret it later. Ray...
 

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One other thing to consider is the manufacturer only promisses accuracy at torque reading plus or minus a percentage. Just for and example, if you had a 4% wrench and torqued to 100 lbs as read on the wrench. The torque applied would be somewhere between 96 & 104 lbs. So if the torque required is 95 to 105, always shoot for the middle to alow for the torque wrench accuracy. OK, I'll shut up now...
 

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Torquing is kind of iffy anyway as most of the torque applied is lost in friction and actual clamping force is only about 10% of the torque value so a little variation in the wrench doesn't matter a lot. The main thing on something like a head is getting the clamping force even and the only way to do that accurately is with torque angle ( turning each bolt the same amount in degrees). If the manufacturer doesn't give that spec you're stuck with torque wrenches.
 

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Thanks for the input, being that the wrench has not been beat up I think i'll use it. I have been reading about useing moly paste on threads to really cut the friction, that should give accurate results.
Tom
 
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