Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Still a winger at heart.
Joined
·
20,868 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
imported post

At the end of this sad article...

---

Motorcyclist dies from injuries in Belt Line crash

By Mark Baker

The Register-Guard

Appeared in print: Thursday, Sep 17, 2009


[line]


News Updates: Story
[line]


Timothy Russell Tull got his driver license stamped with an “M” on Monday, meaning he was free and clear to legally ride a motorcycle in the state of Oregon.

Later that day, he was in an ambulance flying east over Belt Line Road to Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend, the same direction he’d been heading at about 4:10 p.m. when he lost control of his 1997 Yamaha bike and crashed on Belt Line just west of the Highway 99 overpass.

Tull, 21, died about 2:30 a.m. Wednesday of head injuries he sustained in the crash, according to Oregon State Police.

“He was a teddy bear. He loved life,” his mother, Gina Quinby of Eugene, said Wednesday.

Tull, a Springfield resident, was a 2006 graduate of Willamette High School in Eugene, where he played football for the Wolverines. He was on his way to a friend’s house in Springfield to play video games when the crash happened, Quinby said.

Tull was enrolled at Lane Community College for the fall term and had aspirations of getting into the school’s nursing program, she said. He also was working as a press brake operator at Johnson Crushers International, a Eugene-based company that makes rock crushers that grind rock into gravel, she said.

Police initially said Tull was reportedly speeding when he encountered a disabled car that was partially blocking the left lane on Belt Line. He crashed when he tried to lay his motorcycle down on the pavement, and it appeared that his helmet may have come off during the crash, police said Tuesday.

But investigators are still trying to determine exactly what happened, Sgt. Ted Phillips said Wednesday.

“There’s some indication that his helmet came off,” Phillips said. Whether that was the cause of the head injuries that ultimately led to Tull’s death is yet to be determined, Phillips said.

Nor is there any certainty yet as to whether Tull was in fact speeding, Phillips said.

Motorcycle crashes in the state have more than doubled since 2002, Oregon Department of Transportation figures indicate. The number of motorcycle fatalities have also climbed since then, though not as dramatically.

Motorcycle crashes have also increased dramatically in Eugene and Lane County, according to statistics provided by Sylvia Vogel, an ODOT crash analyst. There were 73 motorcycle crashes in Lane County in 2008, for example, up from 46 in 2005 and 28 in 2002.

The state counted seven motorcycle fatalities in Lane County in 2008, compared with none in 2005 and two in 2002. The reasons for the surge in motorcycle accidents are unclear, but “the motorcycle is usually going too fast for the conditions” in most crashes, said Michelle O’Leary, motorcycle program manager for ODOT. Operator inexperience is the No. 1 reason for motorcycle crashes, she said, followed by speeding and alcohol.

Because of the increase in crashes, the Legislature this year passed a new law governing motorcycle endorsements by the state’s Driver and Motor Vehicle division, O’Leary said. Currently, only motorcyclists 20 and younger must provide proof of training on a motorcycle before being endorsed by the DMV, she said. Those 21 and older need only pass a knowledge and skill test at the DMV to receive their endorsement, O’Leary said.

But Senate Bill 546 requires mandatory proof of training for motorcyclists of all ages, phased in over a five-year period. Beginning on Jan. 1, 2010, all first-time motorcycle endorsements for riders 20 and younger will require proof of training. On Jan. 1, 2011, all motorcyclists 30 and younger will need proof of training through an approved course to receive an endorsement. In 2012, that goes up to age 40 and younger, and so on, until all motorcyclists must show proof by 2015.

Tull got his motorcycle about a month ago, his mother said.

“He had lots of friends, mostly his high school football friends,” Quinby said. “He was a good kid.”
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,136 Posts
imported post

Mandatory training was considered here a few years ago. The problem is access to training for those who live in remote, rural areas. Those people are at a disadvantage and it may not be realistic to have training centers in every town.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
236 Posts
imported post

Have to see what the final language of the bill ends up being. AZ has a proof of training requirement as well.....but it can be accomplished 2 ways..........either by taking the MSF course, which gets you your "M" without taking the skills test at DMV or by holding a learner's permit prior to applying for the M endorsement. If you areunder 18, you have to hold the permit for 6 months prior to applying for the endorsement.
 

·
Texas Boy
Joined
·
278 Posts
imported post

Texas just changed on 9/1 to require an approved training class for all new "M" endorsements. As far as I know there isn't a plan to make those already licensed take the class. Of course, even in Texas our remote areas probably aren't as remote as some of those in Alberta.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
495 Posts
imported post

Hey motorcycle training is a good thing, but mandatory? I don't know about that. Does Oregon require mandatory training for cars. How many young people are killed in automobile accidents in Oregon every year? What percentage of registered motorcyclist are involved in accidents?

I know the Insurance companies state that comparison between autos and motorcycles are different.....claiming motorcyclist receive more life threatening injuries when involved in an accident.

Who knows whats the right thing to do, I know I don't. I just think mandatory is an over reaction.

:action:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,276 Posts
imported post

And WHAT will that do? This kid crashed the same day he got his endorsement! EVERYTHING should have been fresh in his mind. You can't learn driving too fast for conditions, from any book. It's called common sense. I came through there about 15 minutes after it happened and rush hour traffic was crazy.

Tried to lay his bike down? Somehow, I don't think that's your first reaction, especially on a sportster type bike. It laid flat, with NO crash guards. Too fast and no experience, plain and simple.

Yeah, I know....welcome to the Peoples' Republic of Eugene. This area is a joke.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,631 Posts
imported post

It's very sad, only 21 and he hadn't even tasted life. My prayers go out to his family.
The problem with youth today and it's been the same for centuries is that they think nothing will happen to them, they are fearless and that is their downfall.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,136 Posts
imported post

The thing that gets people into trouble is the one thing that you can't train for, nor test for. Attitude.

I used to teach motorcycle riders. It was entirely voluntary. Studies found that those who took training were less likely to get into accidents. Duh!!! My theory is that it had more to do with the student's ATTITUDE, rather than the actual training. The person who voluntarily takes a training course already has the right attitude and is a low risk to get into an accident in the first place. They come because they want to learn to ride properly.

On the other hand, someone who is forced to take a course will do whatever he/she needs to do to pass, then go back to driving like a jerk.

You can't legislate common sense, and you can't legislate attitude.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top