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Clutch quit working on my 87 GL1200I. Checked MC and found it low with green sludge in bottom of master cylinder. Cleaned and flushed system. I then cleaned and flushed the brake systems only to find that the RF brake line had been disconnected and blocked off. Took the caliper off and found pistons stuck in their bores. I had to use the grease gun method to free them. Cleaned and rebuilt the caliper assembly, checked line to see that it was clear. The fitting on the master cylinder end of the line was rusty but was able to clean it up with some PB Blaster (great stuff BTW). At last I went to remove the plug from the master cylinder only to find that PO had epoxied it closed instead. Now waiting on an eBay rear master cylinder to replace mine so I can re activate the RF brake. Any Ideas on why the heck it was disabled in the first place other than PO didn't want to rebuild the caliper?? One last thing, should I use some type of thread sealer on the flair nuts when I screw them into the replacement master cylinder?
 

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sealers are not needed nor recomended on brake lines , new copper washers are though. flaired fittings will reseal,.
 

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Welcome to the world of PO's who think they know what they are doing. My 1980 had 8 of them and from what shape the bike was and with different expertise from each, the decision when bought was to completely break it down and test and check everything.

That proved to be the right decision. After 100 hours of checking, testing, fixing the bike has proven to be a very good machine with no, zero break downs and no problems at all over the past 8 years.

Stay with it and check everything...it will prove out to be a good bike and now with your recent repairs one with a good history that is now reliable and with an unknown past gone with time, patience and a caring hand.

Many so called repairs by unknowing repairmen are best left alone because of their ignorance or bold attempts to hide a flaw they unintentionally or with intent change a good bike to a crap bike. And along comes guys like us.

Keep at it and all the best, you are keeping an aged machine from the scrap heap and like me there will come a time when others on the road see that bike and ask, "What year is it? " And will show their shock, "19 what?"
 

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I wonder if they blocked the RF brake to where they would have a stand-alone rear brake? Years ago, I remember riding with several people who didn't feel confident using the front brake, so they would only use the rear.
 

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JSB wrote:
I wonder if they blocked the RF brake to where they would have a stand-alone rear brake? Years ago, I remember riding with several people who didn't feel confident using the front brake, so they would only use the rear.
There's a recipe for disaster...
 

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I've seen people pull the brake line, just in case they grabbed the brake lever by mistake. I've had people argue with me on the point that the front brake is dangerous and shouldn't be used, yet they could never explain why every bike has one, and most states require it by law.
 

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cheddarpecker wrote:
I've seen people pull the brake line, just in case they grabbed the brake lever by mistake. I've had people argue with me on the point that the front brake is dangerous and shouldn't be used, yet they could never explain why every bike has one, and most states require it by law.
All cars, trucks, over the road tractors, and most bicycles have front brakes.



Now there must be somereason ......


>>>>>>>Action
 

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The last 3 bikes I've bought have been screwed up by the P.O.s usually butchered wiring or someone has stripped nuts,bolts or the holes because they tried to force the wrong sizes,(such as trying to use standard instead of metric)then there's the rusted,froze parts from sitting outside and not being covered and cleaned properly.But once you get the work done and hit the road there's no better feeling then the pride of knowing that all the scrapped knuckles,the sweat and headaches were worth it and you did it yourself.
 

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Judging by the age of your bike, and assuming a PO hasn't already done it. if you are going through all this trouble with the brakes it might be a good idea to replace any rubber lines, stainless steel would be the best but even new rubber would be OK. After 27 years those lines will be pretty mushy. Maybe even rebuild the master cylinders (clutch included) if that nasty brake fluid has been in there for such a long time.

Just my 2 cents (1.5 US) worth.
 

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ActionSEi wrote:
cheddarpecker wrote:
I've seen people pull the brake line, just in case they grabbed the brake lever by mistake. I've had people argue with me on the point that the front brake is dangerous and shouldn't be used, yet they could never explain why every bike has one, and most states require it by law.
All cars, trucks, over the road tractors, and most bicycles have front brakes.



Now there must be somereason ......


>>>>>>>Action
Increased stopping power is the obvious one and all over the road motorized vehicles( in North America at least) Must have 2 separate braking systems.
 

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cheddarpecker wrote:
I've seen people pull the brake line, just in case they grabbed the brake lever by mistake. I've had people argue with me on the point that the front brake is dangerous and shouldn't be used, yet they could never explain why every bike has one, and most states require it by law.
This dates back to the 'early days' of motorcycling. The front brake was almost totally ineffective and the rear brake was the 'one to use'.
Course it's well known know that the vast majority of your braking power comes from the front brake…. in a 'traditional' brake setup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
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I just have to think that the engineers at Honda are better equipped than I am to puzzle all this out. Hopefully I will be able to get it up to specs soon. Meanwhile, I can continue to ride it as is until parts come in. Oh, and don't get me started on stuff like the disconnected vacuum advance, maladjusted carburetors and so on. It's a credit to Honda that the poor thing would start and run as well as it did, horrible gas mileage notwithstanding.
As a former motorcycle police officer I have some experience with large bikes. I think that a panic braking situation using rear brake only might result in your swapping ends. Try that for thrills. :shock:
 

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How many riders have high sided by locking up the rear till it started getting sideways, then released it in panic, only to have the tire grip again and launch them up and over?

I love to watch Moto GP racing and the slow motion shots of them backing into corners with a controlled sideways drift!
I cannot even imagine skill like that.
 

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Goldwinger wrote:
ActionSEi wrote:
cheddarpecker wrote:
I've seen people pull the brake line, just in case they grabbed the brake lever by mistake. I've had people argue with me on the point that the front brake is dangerous and shouldn't be used, yet they could never explain why every bike has one, and most states require it by law.
All cars, trucks, over the road tractors, and most bicycles have front brakes.



Now there must be somereason ......


>>>>>>>Action
Increased stopping power is the obvious one and all over the road motorized vehicles( in North America at least) Must have 2 separate braking systems.

I was being silly.



>>>>>>>Action
 

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Goldwinger wrote:
ActionSEi wrote:
cheddarpecker wrote:
I've seen people pull the brake line, just in case they grabbed the brake lever by mistake. I've had people argue with me on the point that the front brake is dangerous and shouldn't be used, yet they could never explain why every bike has one, and most states require it by law.
All cars, trucks, over the road tractors, and most bicycles have front brakes.



Now there must be somereason ......


>>>>>>>Action
Increased stopping power is the obvious one and all over the road motorized vehicles( in North America at least) Must have 2 separate braking systems.

I was being silly.



>>>>>>>Action
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
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Feetup wrote:
How many riders have high sided by locking up the rear till it started getting sideways, then released it in panic, only to have the tire grip again and launch them up and over?

I love to watch Moto GP racing and the slow motion shots of them backing into corners with a controlled sideways drift!
I cannot even imagine skill like that.
I find the Isle of Mann TT especially crazy. 200 mph on public roads :action:
 

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Yeah, I know this thread is old, I found it while searching for something and just had to respond. In this case, both the Honda engineers and the PO messed up. The Honda engineers messed up by designing a linked braking system for the 1200s that does not allow separate control of the front and rear brakes. That is not the way motorcycle brakes are supposed to work, and can be dangerous under some conditions.

The PO messed up in the way they apparently tried to separate the brakes so one could be used without the other. The Goldwing is a large heavy bike, and absolutely needs BOTH front brakes, AND the rear brake, but not connected together. Using epoxy in/on any part of a brake system is a very bad idea, the brake fluid could eventually dissolve it and leave you with no brakes.

I converted my linked brakes to regular brakes the proper way, using motorcycle brake parts. I removed the line from the rear master cylinder that goes to the front, and plugged the port with a threaded screw in plug that fit properly. I then removed all the lines and fittings on the front brakes, both the master cylinder and both calipers. I removed and disposed of the line that ran from the rear brake to the front. I then used the front hose and junction block from a Kawasaki Nomad to connect the front brakes. It fit perfectly. I connected the line to the master cylinder, mounted the junction block to the lower triple clamp, and connected the 2 brake hoses coming from it one to each front caliper. This is the way almost all dual front discs are designed, and it works perfectly. This is NOT a "hack job" it is the way engineers designed almost all motorcycle brake systems, and all parts used were designed for motorcycle brake systems. It works perfectly, as a "separate" front and rear brake system. There is no way to tell it did not come from the factory that way.
 

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While I have no problem with an individual front/rear system I have no problem with the linked brakes either. I think they did it because most riders were not experienced with such a large motorcycle and using just the rear brake as some still do the stopping power was pretty limited. On the 1100 stds. (80-82) it is really easy to lock the rear wheel. On my 83I with linked brakes I could not tell they were linked by the feel, neither on an 1800 with it's much more sophisticated system, they are linked both ways. I still use the rear brake as you normally would i.e. adjusting speed or position in a corner and it is not noticeable that it also applies the front brakes. The greatest thing about the 1800 brakes, (not talking about ABS) is you can nail the front brake alone at high speed and not worry about it. It will stop as straight and almost as fast as using both.
 
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