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Well, I bled my clutch today, and I needed to pull the PCV tank to reach the bleed nipple. It was full of a semi-clear liquid that mixed with oil. What is that? How often does someone normally need to dump that tank?
 

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It's blow-by from the engine, you ought to dump it when container is half full. Lots of wet weather riding seems to create more.
 

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You'll need to drain the tank once a year, or do what some owners do and just drill a hole in it so it draind itself all the time. The tank is not part of the vacuum system so a hole won't do any harm.
 

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philcsand wrote:
Well, I bled my clutch today, and I needed to pull the PCV tank to reach the bleed nipple. It was full of a semi-clear liquid that mixed with oil. What is that? How often does someone normally need to dump that tank?
philcsand, that is just basically condensation water from the crankcase breather. If you operate your motorcycle in cold or damp weather like I do that tank will fill up pretty fast. I ride my Wing to work most days as long as there isn't ice on the road, some days it's as low as 15°F in the morning.

You could just drill a small hole in the bottom of that tank, but the other end of one ofthe upper lines going to that tank enters the air cleaner on the inside of the filter element so any dirt or sand pulled in through a drilled hole could end up in the engine intake on the un-filtered side.

What I did with mine was drill a hole in the bottom of the tank (lowest place on the tank), then inserted one of those split tail General Motors plastic push pin trim retainers (black plastic push pin rivet). That allows the condensation to slowly wick out but doesn't leave enough of a hole for dirt to enter.

I suppose you could always just do as the book says & drain it occasionally but that is difficult to remember. Before installing that plastic rivet I have had my condensation tank fill in as quickly a 2 weeks during wet riding weather with many cold starts.

Twisty
 

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Hi Twisty.. What type of clothing do you wear while riding in 15 degree weather?.. I have trouble holding on to the handlebars when it gets down to 50..!! LOL
 

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I wired up my Honda jacket and a pair of lined pants, when they're switched on I still get 13-14 volts and can keep warm down to 40F - 6C thats as cold as I am willing to ride in any more..

After all one is supposed to gain a little wisdom with age :)
 

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Renegade wrote:
Hi Twisty.. What type of clothing do you wear while riding in 15 degree weather?.. I have trouble holding on to the handlebars when it gets down to 50..!! LOL
Renegade, ALL I CAN GET ON ME!!

Actually about all I use is a good set of below 0° rated long underwear & insulated leather coat with matching insulated chaps. I do wear a real good convertible full face helmet with head coveringbacala inside the helmet. I'm good for about 15-20 miles going to work then my fingers start to get cold as all I wear for gloves is insulated snowmobile gloves. I really need to rig up a set of gauntlets for hand protection but otherwise it's really not that bad. That is on a 1200 GoldWing with high windshield. On my other more open bikes I get cold a lot faster.


Probably the worst thing about the cold iskeeping my face shield from frosting over on the inside from my breath.


Twisty
 

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Probably the worst thing about the cold iskeeping my face shield from frosting over on the inside from my breath.
Two tricks as I ride in the teens as well.



First, rub some plant juice in the inside of your face shield. The clorophyl inhibits fogging. Second, tie some plastic like a bandana over you nose to force your breath down and out around the neck. Do try and not suffocateyourself.





As to gloves I still like my childs furry rubber boots, just cut the sole to slip over, close them with a wee bit of duct tape and then stab your hands on inside. No one even notices unless you get the pastel pink ones!!
 

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Brojees wrote:
First, rub some plant juice in the inside of your face shield. The clorophyl inhibits fogging. Second, tie some plastic like a bandana over you nose to force your breath down and out around the neck. Do try and not suffocateyourself.


As to gloves I still like my childs furry rubber boots, just cut the sole to slip over, close them with a wee bit of duct tape and then stab your hands on inside. No one even notices unless you get the pastel pink ones!!
Brojees, that (plant juice) is one thing I haven't tried. I have tried about everythingelse though. About the best I have found so far is Foamy shaving cream. As long as I don't breath too fast or hard it is working. I do have a breath deflector that goes in my helmet but I hate using that thing. I usually just crack the visor to the first or second notch & all is good, that does let in some cold air though.

As for the "furry rubber boots", that doesn't sound too far off from the furry interiorthick snowmobile gloves I am using now. Probably mittens would be better but I can barely use the turn signal & light's switch now.

It's really not too bad but I wouldn't want to ride 300 miles in thesub 20°'s.



Twisty
 

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Here in Victoria, BC it gets down to 20 F sometimes in the winter. I ride to work everyday unless there is excess ice on the roads. Long under wear is the key. That and a neck warmer.

A friend of mine, who shall remain nameless, lives in Prince George, BC. Far too much snow to ride there year round. I often send him pictures of me riding on special events such as Christmas Day. They usually illicit some sort of response that is not fit to be printed here.

Tony
 

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Twisty, the neat thing about the boots is you put your gloved hand inside of them and you have room for all your controls and levers, the heel works perfect for clutch and brake.

I believe though there is a movement here to have me committed for suggesting it. Perhaps not though, after all Redwing has not been put away yet and he is further beyond the pale than my own self!!
 
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