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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Here are some pics or the issue I have with the trunk. Not sure what to do as it is extensive on the mounting but cosmetically the bag looks great. Anyone leaning on the backrest could easily tear it off ans shown with the mount pics. Left side is bad, right looks ok but suspect that there is damage there under bracket. Externally the bag is pristine. Looking for some suggestions.

Been a rough week at work and this is the first time I have gotten on since. Sorry bought the no pic thing... Its a 1984 Interstate
 

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Here are some pics or the issue I have with the trunk. Not sure what to do as it is extensive on the mounting but cosmetically the bag looks great. Anyone leaning on the backrest could easily tear it off ans shown with the mount pics. Left side is bad, right looks ok but suspect that there is damage there under bracket. Externally the bag is pristine. Looking for some suggestions.
no pics in post bro:?
 

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That's an easy fix:

Steps:
1) Do not remove the trunk (eg Maintain proper position of all pieces)
2) Use a small dab of super glue to Tack bond all the broken pieces together on the inside.
3) Dis-assemble the trunk, so as to gain access to both sides.
4) Use super glue again, to tack bond the pieces from the underside.
5) Wash the repair area, to remove any dirt and especially grease. Maintain clean hands.
6) Use a dremal tool with sanding wheel to Rough up all the (pending) bond surfaces... eg All the broken pieces, plus an additional 1" all around.
7) Cut some fiberglass cloth to fit the roughened surface area, on both inside and undersides.
8) Use a brush to apply Fiberglass Resin to the roughened surface area on the inside, then locate the cloth atop that, using brush to press it down into the resin. Minimize the amount of resin used (eg Less is better). Repeat for Underside. Ok to add multiple layers of cloth... It will be a Guess as to how much to use, but certainly 1-3 layers of 6oz cloth would be pretty strong.
9) Cure at room temperature (above 70F is best).
10) Use dremel tool again to grind away any rough edges.
11) Drill holes as required to match hinges.
12) Install trunk.

Note that you can typically buy Fiberglass Resin and Cloth at most autoparts stores, often together as a kit, for about $20
 

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What Alex said, OR... you could use black ABS glue and self-adhesive drywall tape to do as strong as new repair. You'll need this:

And this:


Apply a light coat of ABS glue on the inside to stabilize any loose parts prior to disassembly. Once you have all the pieces stabilized you may remove the trunk. Now take and cut a small piece of ABS pipe and heat it just enough for it to flatten out. Shape it to fit the missing piece(s). Or you may apply some backing tape from the exterior and fill the empty space(s) with ABS shavings. Apply another light coat of ABS glue over the entire cracked area from the interior. Once its set, apply a coat of self-adhesive drywall tape over the cracked area. Apply several thin coats of ABS glue over the whole area. Once its set turn the trunk over and give it several light coats of ABS glue from the exterior. Allow to dry. Drill any holes that need to be reopened and then re-install the trunk.
I repaired a badly damaged saddlebag in this manner two years ago and its still doing just fine. And the hole I had on the wheel side of the bag was big enough to put three fingers through. I shaved some ABS pipe and filled the hole with shavings and ABS glue. You'd have a difficult time finding where the hole was now.
This method works well in areas that aren't visible or need repainting. If you're needing to do some repainting I'd go the fiberglass route. But the bags/trunk are made of ABS so using ABS glue creates a seamless bond.
 

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You could also use this stuff to repair it. Leave it in place as is and use this in the cracks to fill it in. I have used it on other cracks and it works well. Bit pricey but one bottle goes a long way.

http://plastex.net/
 

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That looks bad. I doubt there is a good way to repair it due to the stress on that area. I would look for some used parts to replace it with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'll most likely glass it as I am use to working with glass. I do like the ABS glue and the Plastex repairs also but again like Fiber glass as it is a medium I am use to. I have found a couple cracks also on the fairing in hidden spots that will need to be glasses also. I can get all needed supplies cheaper than the auto parts kits down the road my question is what weave would work best on the application? Never glassed plastic before.
 

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My experience with fibreglass is it cracks and parts company with the ABS after a while.
 

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Yes, I've had the same problem with fiberglass. It seems to part company with the plastic in a short amount of time. Especially if there's any stress on the repair. ABS cement and drywall mesh seems to work the best. I've done a few repairs with them and they are holding up perfectly. To make a sort of putty, you can grind up a piece of abs pipe and add it to the cement. I used a very coarse sanding disk to create the grindings. The only drawback is that it takes a long time to fully dry out so do it in layers.
 

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I'll second ABS cement. The trunk is made of ABS so you effectively get a chemical weld with ABS cement. I've repaired several trunks and saddlebags on 1100s I was refurbishing in my old shot with the stuff. I can guarantee it will give a stronger bond than fiberglass resin or epoxy. I tested just about everything I could find some years ago and found an ABS glue repair gives by far the best bonding because the solvent in the cement will actually dissolve some of the surface of the substrate and fuse with it.
You can strengthen the joint with fiberglass sheetrock tape, glass cloth or even some window screen. I have used a piece of ABS plastic sheet, cut it to the shape of the repair, heat it with a heat gun and press it in place to form fit to the part you're repairing. Repeat until you have a good fit than glue the reinforcement to the repair with ABS cement. Small cracks can be filled with ABS cement. Just tape the outside and work a thin coat of ABS cement into the crack from the inside. Once that cures give it another coat on the inside.
One thing to be careful with using ABS cement is to use several thin coats instead of thick ones. Too thick a layer will skin over and the inside will take a long time to harden. Also too thick of an application can soften up the whole area you're trying to repair.
You can use dust from sanding a piece of ABS pipe fitting and mixing with a bit of ABS cement to make ABS putty.
The type of ABS cement is the cheap gooey black stuff most hardware stores sell, not the two part stuff or the PVC/ABS type.
 

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Good old black ABS cement is good, just make sure the area is sanded and cleaned really well. If prepped and applied right, it will be stronger than the surrounding plastic.

Another, more complicated option, is to get some ABS pipe from a hardware store, turn it into shavings and mix it with acetone until you have a nice thick paste, then just apply like you would the glue.

But if I'm honest, I used to do it that way until the guys on this forum turned me onto the glue idea. I don't use the old technique anymore because the glue basically does the same exact thing with a lot less mess and effort.

That said, you will want to repair as much as you can with it bolted in place, then pull it off and finalize the repair.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Ok ABS cement it is, sold me there as it is the trunk with the backrest mounted so it needs to be a strong repair. the couple other cracks in the faring would probably be a easier fix with the ABS cement also.
 

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I used ABS cement on my saddlebag, (all I found locally was clear cement) but I also bought some sheets of ABS plastic, and cut and formed the pieces with a heat gun to fit my needs.

It's inside the saddlebag, so who cares about what it looks like after it's done.

[ame]http://www.amazon.com/Install-Bay-89-00-9031-Plastic-8-Inch/dp/B0007WTF02/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1355066506&sr=8-1&keywords=ABS+Plastic[/ame]
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Well ran to Lowes and picked up the ABS cement and a 300' roll of self-adhesive dry wall tape. The tape I picked out is the ultra thin as the weave looks tighter for the repair. I'm just waiting on the temp to raise a couple degrees here so I can just get it tacked up for removal. I'll try and shoot some video on the repair as I don't really see a lot of repair videos.

I have a question that maybe an idea to help strengthen the repair. do you think using a dremel with a small round bit in the cracked areas would help the bonding of the cracks? I know with plastic welding it is common practice to do so for a larger surface area for the weld bond. An idea I have been tossing around in my head before starting.

Costs so far, ABS 16 oz can $7.68, and the roll or drywall tape was $7.98 I bought the larger quantities as I have yet to uncover all possible cracks.
 

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I used a dremel to create a 'channel' when I glued the interior of the fairing on my Silverwing. Seemed to work well. The whole mounting area was cracked from stress and brittleness of aging. I also got a sheet of ABS and glued it on the inside after I'd repaired the fairing itself. A lot of stress on those mounting brackets so any I felt that any support I could give it would help. That was about 5 years ago and the current owner hasn't had a problem with it.
 

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The whole idea, whether using the cement method or the acetone method, is to apply new ABS to fill the cracks. The new ABS, because it is in a solvent that desolves ABS, it will desolve the old ABS that it comes in direct contact with forming what is essentially a chemical weld. So, just like regular welding, the larger the surface/contact area between the weld and the old material, the stronger the weld will hold the old material...

So yeah, grinding the cracks isn't a bad idea at all :cheesygrin:.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thought so, but as the temp outside is just touching 40 which is the recommended min on the glue am going to have to go get a torpedo heater to get going on it. Have learned that recommended temps really help...lol
 

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Don't know if it's been said already but it's a good idea to stop drill any cracks before applying mesh and abs glue. a #30 dril bit should do-drilled right at the apex of the crack to prevent it from spreading or continuing after the repair is done.
 
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