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I recently came back from a GREAT first road trip. About 1560 miles over Memorial Day weekend. Portland Or to Sacramento Ca... the long way.

Today I was finally cleaning off the million and one bugs I killed when I notied the "play" in my shifter. I assumed the shifter shaft would be VERY rigid and that the toe shifter would merely rotate the shaft.. but the shaft has about a quarter inch of free play. I mean literally it will move up and or forward about a 1/4 inch and slop back to the original position when you stop pushing it. You don't notice it when you shift with your foot, and shifting seems to be great, no issues at all. Is this movement normal?

It's a 1999 GL1500 Aspencade if that makes any difference.

Thanks in advance

Mike
 

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MikeC wrote:
Today I was finally cleaning off the million and one bugs I killed when I notied the "play" in my shifter. I assumed the shifter shaft would be VERY rigid and that the toe shifter would merely rotate the shaft.. but the shaft has about a quarter inch of free play. I mean literally it will move up and or forward about a 1/4 inch and slop back to the original position when you stop pushing it. You don't notice it when you shift with your foot, and shifting seems to be great, no issues at all. Is this movement normal?
Mike
Mines' the same Mike, it's a 1993 with 93,000 miles. No leaks no shifting problems, I don't intend to worry about mine unless it acts up. I think most of these bikes will be the same.
 

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Exavid:

Thanks, that's the answer I was hoping to hear. I'll keep an eye on it, but it has worked well the "entire" 7 months I have owned the bike!

Mike
 

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Thanks again. The bike works so well, I just couldn't believe it was a problem... except for my preconceived notion about it should be perfectly stationary but for rotation. And, I suppose, its not the ONLY preconceived notion I ought to ditch, but we'll deal with them one at a time! Thanks again.

Mike
 

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This will be good to know if I move up to a GL1500 someday.
 

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Not being one to look a gift horse in the mouth,,, I may take off the cover if it doesn't involve too much and see what I can see. I'll post what I find, but it will be a few days before I have time to take a look.

Mike
 

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77GL1 wrote:
I guess normal is normal, but these answers surprise me....neither my 77GL or my 76SS have anything but rotational movement, same with my old Brits. If I'd ever seen any slop, I'd be looking for a bearing change.
I've seen many Goldwing that have the 'slop' in the shifter shaft. My 1200 also did it and my 1500 does too. I think it's mostly due to the fact that the shaft extends a long ways out from the bearing.
 

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Well, I crawled under to take a look. I tried to remove the metal cover that is below the engine where the gear shift comes out, but after removing the three screws across the bottom and the one to the right, it was still very firmly attached. I removed the two left side tupperware pieces and then could easily see into where the gear shift meets the engine/tranny point.

All I can say is no wonder a little play developes. Think of the toe shifter as an L shaped rod that is splined at the top of the long end to the shaft coming from the engine. I thought that shaft came directly off the engine and that it had too much play.

But that shaft is in fact another L shaped metal bracket, this time it is splined on the end of the short leg onto the actual shaft coming out of the engine/tranny. It is at that point that there is a little play. The rod out of the engine is good, but the short end of the L bracket that is splined and screwed on there has a little movement. Because I couldn't get the side/bottom engine cover off I could only get to the that bolt to check for tightness by using a 1/4 inch drive "wiggler" and socket. The screw is tight as can be, so I 'm not going to worry about it.

But after seeing this double bracket, cantilevered, set up.. I am going to be much more cautious of that "stab into first" when leaving the light... you know the one, where you think you're in gear and you're not, you rev instead of move, and then you kick it down into gear with enough force to "solve the probelm"... I'd say, don't do that.

Thanks to all for the info.

Mike C
 

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That's the point I was trying to make, the length of the shifter in it's entirety makes for the slop. One good side of this design is that there is some inherent flexibility in the long lever so it does protect the shifting mechanism somewhat from shock, the little amount of spring softens the action.
 

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If you look closely at the seal, it looks a little dumb... There is extra surface area between the O.D. and the I.D. around the shift shaft.. That extra meat takes up the slop in the travel so the lip of the seal stays put on the shaft surface. It's also very flexible.. If it's not leaking, it's nothing to worry about.. :goofygrin:
 

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Hey, those fellas at Mother Honda know what they're doing!:cool:
 
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