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77 gl 1000. I understand how a points ignition functions conceptually but i need a little help with electronic. could someone give me a simple overview of how an electronic ignition works. how to adjust timing, etc. mybike has been converted to electronic and was wondering if i should go back to points. thanks in advance.
 

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Just like a points system, an electronic system triggers the spark by cutting off the current to the primary windings on the coil. When this happens, the magnetic field collapses and generates the high voltage current in the secondary windings that goes to the spark plug. Original equipment electronic ignition systems will have a toothed wheel called a “reluctor” that rotates and passes a small pickup. The pickup senses the reluctor passing by and sends a signal to the processor. The processor makes whatever adjustment in spark timing the programming calls for at the current engine speed, throttle opening, etc, and cuts the current to the coil with a hefty transistor. Many of these systems do not have a timing adjustment.



The after-market systems that I have seen do not use a reluctor wheel and pickup, but just use the old points to get the signal for the electronics. A system like this will not have a processor with sophisticated programming to time the spark, but will rely on the old mechanical advance to time the spark for speed and manifold vacuum. The advantages of such a system over the old system are:


  • The points don’t burn because they don’t handle much current.

  • The spark should be stronger because the coil has longer to build and the current to the coil is cut off more cleanly.


If this is the sort of system you have, you should adjust the timing and point gap just as you would without it. You should also make sure the point block is lubricated where it rubs on the cam and make sure the points are clean.
 

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austinstreetman wrote:
The after-market systems that I have seen do not use a reluctor wheel and pickup, but just use the old points to get the signal for the electronics. The points don’t burn because they don’t handle much current.


  • The spark should be stronger because the coil has longer to build and the current to the coil is cut off more cleanly.
None of the aftermarket systems I've seen use the old breaker points. They use inductive pick up coils just like an automotive electronic ignition. The whole point in electronic ignition is to get rid of those damn points!

The only thing that is non-adjustable on your setup is the dwell, but the electronic systems handle that nicely and need no modification. With the electronic system on your '77, you adjust the initial timing with a timing light. Once it's done it's done, and you'll probably not have to mess with it again. Your system still retains the old centerfuge-type spark advance, which is housed under the timing plate.

To adjust the initial timing with a timing light you'll need a glass timing window that takes the place of the timing plug (the plug is just behind the carbs on the left side, on top of the engine. It has a screwdriver slot.). This prevents oil from flying all over the place when the engine is running.

With the timing light inductive pickup on the #1 wire, set the timing to the 'F' mark for #1. Move the timing light inductive pickup to the #2 wireand do the same for #2. Open the throttle for a bit more RPM to check that the centerfuge advance is working.

If you have electronic ignition and it works, I would not go back to breaker points. The breaker point design on this bike is not the best in my opinion, and requires a lot of fiddling to get it right and to keep it right.
 

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Sorry, duplicated so deleted!
 

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:waving::waving:Welcome to the Know World's Best Goldwing Website!:waving::waving:

Austinstreetman and Axelwick have it right, you get a higher voltage out of the electronic ignition conversion. If it uses the original points to trigger it's power transistor you'd time the bike the same way as with points. Most likely whatever it uses to sense the firing point it will adjust pretty much the same way as originally.

Usually the systems that use the points will have instructions to reduce the point gap to increase the dwell time to increase saturation ofthe coil. Also quite often they will allow for a larger gap on the spark plug due to higher voltages. The old Delta system (also sold by Heathkit if anyone remembers them) worked that way. I put one on my old 1970 Beetle. Improved gas mileagebetter than 10%.
 
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