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GL1500: Have you had problems since removing the Fuel Petcock?

  • Yes, harder to start (takes longer to turn over)

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  • Yes, engine hydro-locked

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There is a long-running debate, about the merits of Removing the Fuel Petcock on the GL1500. What is your experience?

Pro's:
-Bypassing a part that commonly fails, in the fuel delivery circuit.
-Avoiding a costly or difficult item to replace.

Con's:
-Siphoning of gas Out of engine, leading to float bowls being dry (eg Takes more cranks to start engine)
-Possible siphoning of gas In to engine, leading to engine failure upon startup (eg Hydrolock)
 

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The few people I know who bypassed it recently because of no repair kits available, all say no problems. I doubt they are all lying buggers, but you never can tell for sure.
 

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Junior Grue
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ALEX BERECZKY wrote:
There is a long-running debate, about the merits of Removing the Fuel Petcock on the GL1500. What is your experience?

Pro's:
-Bypassing a part that commonly fails, in the fuel delivery circuit.
-Avoiding a costly or difficult item to replace.

Con's:
-Siphoning of gas Out of engine, leading to float bowls being dry (eg Takes more cranks to start engine)
-Possible siphoning of gas In to engine, leading to engine failure upon startup (eg Hydrolock)
The last one is the winner and why the petcock is there.
 

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I didn't know people were bypassing it. The original 88's didn't have one and were recalled for retrofit. I take it from the recall, the petcock is there to serve an important purpose. I think it's there to prevent gas from draining back into the carbs and flooding the engine.

I did have problems with mine a year or two back getting clogged, but I replaced it with another used one I got from Ebay. I thought the rebuild kits were still available though.
 

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Mine I bypassed this summer after having it rebuilt. I went over a speed bump and it started starving for fuel. The valve was rebuilt this winter after I discovered the fuel pump was bad. I have not had any problems since. But it is my intent to take the valve off and seal it properly.
 

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"Siphoning of gas Out of engine, leading to float bowls being dry (eg Takes more cranks to start engine)"

I still have mine, but the first start of the day usually goes like this.
One half choke, start, starts fine, acts like it is running out of fuel for a few seconds, picks back up, off with the choke, then it is fine the rest of the day. I don't know if the float bowls are almost dry or if there is an air bubble in the fuel supply line. The fuel filter is supposed to have air in it? I have changed the fuel hoses, filter and clamps, rebuilt the petcock about a year ago, before the parts became hard to find. It is not irritating enough to chase it further right now.
 

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:?I haven't replaced or removed it on my 1500 as of this date, I did pick up a good working like new spare very cheap however. I dissasymbled the spare, saw how really simple it is but if that diaphram ruptures, you cannot simply replace it with a generic piece of rubber.



I read this stuff about flooded engines, my GL1200 has no automatic shutoff. It does have an external pump versus in tank unit in 1500, but there is no shutoff valve in the 1200 other than the manual "off" on the petcock. I dare say few if any 1200 owners actually shut fuel off in riding season.The 1200 has 4 carbs to 1500's two so it offerstwice the chances. The tank is above the carbs in both bikes, 1200s aren't known for fuel hydro lock.



I'm thinking of simply inserting a manually operated petcock for longer storage periods or for those times when I might want to run the carbs dry ...if I come up with the right parts.
 

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It aint rocket science
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ALEX BERECZKY wrote:
There is a long-running debate, about the merits of Removing the Fuel Petcock on the GL1500. What is your experience?

Pro's:
-Bypassing a part that commonly fails, in the fuel delivery circuit.
-Avoiding a costly or difficult item to replace.
There is no upside to removing the petcock.

JD
 

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Monkey with a Football
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DriverRider wrote:
ALEX BERECZKY wrote:
There is a long-running debate, about the merits of Removing the Fuel Petcock on the GL1500. What is your experience?

Pro's:
-Bypassing a part that commonly fails, in the fuel delivery circuit.
-Avoiding a costly or difficult item to replace.
There is no upside to removing the petcock.

JD
Agreed but there is an upside to changing it to this with a little effort:
http://www.dan-marc.com/79-afc11112.html
 

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Ok, at the risk of spilling my ignorance all over the forum, where is the petcock? By now you've also figured out that mine obviously does not get used if it is a manual valve. You guys shut off the fuel when you park the bike?
 

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Monkey with a Football
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awingandaprayer wrote:
Ok, at the risk of spilling my ignorance all over the forum, where is the petcock? By now you've also figured out that mine obviously does not get used if it is a manual valve. You guys shut off the fuel when you park the bike?
It's automatic and vacuum operated on the GL1500.
It is that aluminum vertical disc just in front of the gas cap.
 

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Replacing the petcock is easy. I replaced mine a few weeks ago. I did remove the radio because I also did the air filter at the same time.

1 remove the hoses from the petcock
2 remove the drain hose from the overspill tray
3 take the gas cap off like you would to fill up the bike
4 sneak the overspill tray up on the left side and use a magnetic tip screw driver to remove the screw from the bottom of the petcock mounting bracket.
5 put everything back together

If you need more room because of big hands then you can take the seat off and remove the radio (but leave the cords attached and use your wife's old towel to keep it from scratching the bike.
 

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Alex,

When askingthe pro's and con's of removing the petcock valve perhaps an additionalpoll would be:

"Have you had any problems since you removed your homeowners insurance?"

Point being the petcock is there to protect regardless of the style or type. If I couldn't find rebuild parts ordidn't want to pay for new Honda parts then I would modify the system with something that would work, but I would have a petcock.
 

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chas.weaver wrote:
Alex,

When askingthe pro's and con's of removing the petcock valve perhaps an additionalpoll would be:

"Have you had any problems since you removed your homeowners insurance?"

Point being the petcock is there to protect regardless of the style or type. If I couldn't find rebuild parts ordidn't want to pay for new Honda parts then I would modify the system with something that would work, but I would have a petcock.
The difference as I see it is that Homeowner's Insurance is not a Liability, in and of itself, where-as the petcock valve Is.

eg Not having Homeowner's Ins does not make my house more or less likely to be destroyed by fire. On the other hand, Not having a fuel petcock Does make my bike (and me) less likely to be destroyed by getting rear-ended on the freeway, when my engine dies due to lack of fuel.

That being said, I leave room for the possibility that there is a Benefit to having the Petcock Valve present... and towards that end, this Poll is intended to Discover if there really is a Danger for which this valve offers protection against, such as hydrolock.

So far, I don't see the Benefit of the valve, as I have not heard of anyone's GL1500 being hurt without it.
 

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Monkey with a Football
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My position on this is that a properly functioning fuel shutoff valve whether it be manual or automatic is an important part of the system and should not be bypassed on a permanent basis.

To suggest otherwise sets a bad example and should not be taken by the general populace as an acceptable approach.

If the valve is leaky, yes that is a hazard. If the valve does not pass fuel properly then that also can be a hazard. In either case, the part should be repaired or replaced and not bypassed except for diagnostics and/or temporary need to get to where the necessary repairs can be made, without delay.

There are 3 known solutions for the above problems with these valves.

1. Replace the unit with OEM factory parts
2. Repair the unit with aftermarket repair kits
3. Replace the unit with another functional aftermarket solution

Any of these will solve the problems of leakage or low flow.

I suggest that you not consider the bypass a long term solution. It is not.
You are free to make your own decision about your health and your investment, and think about what you may be passing on to the next buyer.

Make your decision wisely, Grasshopper.
 

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"There is no upside to removing the petcock."
I will agree with this and Alex's statement about the insurance, but NOT about removing the petcock.....it is there for a reason!
 

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I had to bypass mine as the stealership did not have one and would take a week to get. I was leaving on a long trip (4700 miles in 8 days) and mine was leaking. I have not had a problem with mine but it has only been bypassed about 3 weeks.

I intend to replace it or rebuild it (not much luck finding the kits) as I also beleive that it was there for a purpose. You can think about it as insurance inthat it will prevent a hydrolock, which, if it did happen,is going to cost you a lot more than the cost of the valve ($162.00 at my dealer).
 

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Rudy wrote:
My position on this is that a properly functioning fuel shutoff valve whether it be manual or automatic is an important part of the system and should not be bypassed on a permanent basis.

To suggest otherwise sets a bad example and should not be taken by the general populace as an acceptable approach.

If the valve is leaky, yes that is a hazard. If the valve does not pass fuel properly then that also can be a hazard. In either case, the part should be repaired or replaced and not bypassed except for diagnostics and/or temporary need to get to where the necessary repairs can be made, without delay.

There are 3 known solutions for the above problems with these valves.

1. Replace the unit with OEM factory parts
2. Repair the unit with aftermarket repair kits
3. Replace the unit with another functional aftermarket solution

Any of these will solve the problems of leakage or low flow.

I suggest that you not consider the bypass a long term solution. It is not.
You are free to make your own decision about your health and your investment, and think about what you may be passing on to the next buyer.

Make your decision wisely, Grasshopper.
+1


sheeze........
 

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mikef wrote:
Rudy wrote:
My position on this is that a properly functioning fuel shutoff valve whether it be manual or automatic is an important part of the system and should not be bypassed on a permanent basis.

To suggest otherwise sets a bad example and should not be taken by the general populace as an acceptable approach.

If the valve is leaky, yes that is a hazard. If the valve does not pass fuel properly then that also can be a hazard. In either case, the part should be repaired or replaced and not bypassed except for diagnostics and/or temporary need to get to where the necessary repairs can be made, without delay.

There are 3 known solutions for the above problems with these valves.

1. Replace the unit with OEM factory parts
2. Repair the unit with aftermarket repair kits
3. Replace the unit with another functional aftermarket solution

Any of these will solve the problems of leakage or low flow.

I suggest that you not consider the bypass a long term solution. It is not.
You are free to make your own decision about your health and your investment, and think about what you may be passing on to the next buyer.

Make your decision wisely, Grasshopper.
+1


sheeze........
me too... I'll probably go witha solenoid solution when mine gives up the ghost, but I really don't understand the "devolution" attitude... its there for a reason (and we evenhave a good idea forthe reason)...
 

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can you you replace it with an 1/4" ball valve?? my 1500 is my 1st bike with out one you had to turn off by hand, took me a long time to stop looking for it!!:doh:
 
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