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Well guys and guru's...

I would like to know what to adjust, clean, inspect to gain back some fuel mileage. I'm currently getting35.52 MPG on the last tank (140 miles on the main tank). I changed the cam belts, pull the carbs and cleaned them, synro them as well, air filter was cleaned (washable). Spark plugs are like brand new (light tan to white color).

What to do...??? Or what did I miss??
 

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What kind of mileage were you getting?

I get around 36-37mpg on my 83 Aspencade. I have seen several other posts about mileage and I seem to be in about the middle of the range. After looking at what carb rebuild kits cost, I decided I can buy a whole bunch of gas and not risk messing up an excellent running machine for only a couple more mpg! I ride my:11grey: every day I go to work. If and when I need to take it off the road forsome other reasonI'll look into it. Until then I just don't feel that a couple of miles per gallon is worth the cost.

Maybe I'm wrong. If I could get another 10mpg out of it I would look into it. I just don't think it would improve that much.

Bob :11grey:
 

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The best I have done is a smidge under 50. It was all highway, even though is was on some twisties and a modest climb. When I putter around town, and commute, I get aroung 45. I feel pretty fortunate. It saves me a ton, especially considering my cage is a big old chevy pickup, and gas hit $2.51:bananas: yesterday.

:11black:
 

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Welcome....If the plugs are good, then it's not running rich. Are you sure it's not too leaned out? Any other performance issues -- backfiring, bogging down? How's your tire pressure? Any brake drag? Are you plug caps good? Low voltage=weak spark=poor ignition=poor performance. Fuel filter clean?
 

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mag wrote:
Welcome....If the plugs are good, then it's not running rich. Are you sure it's not too leaned out? Any other performance issues -- backfiring, bogging down? How's your tire pressure? Any brake drag? Are you plug caps good? Low voltage=weak spark=poor ignition=poor performance. Fuel filter clean?
Ok... Now I haven't changed the fuel filter since I bought it. It might be a good idea to change it...

I think the rear caliper is dragging a bit. Sometimes it takes a lot to get the bike to roll backwards on level ground.

Is the caliper easy to disassemble to clean/rebuild? I don't think it needs rebuliding just a good cleaning and fluid bled... When I had the rear tire off I inspected the rear shoes and caliper assembly. I clean the exterior of the caliper and compressed the two pistons to get clearance for the rotor. But during the compression it was extremely tight... Seem a bit to tight for me...:shock:
 

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Mopar1973man wrote:
I think the rear caliper is dragging a bit. Sometimes it takes a lot to get the bike to roll backwards on level ground.

Is the caliper easy to disassemble to clean/rebuild? I don't think it needs rebuliding just a good cleaning and fluid bled... When I had the rear tire off I inspected the rear shoes and caliper assembly. I clean the exterior of the caliper and compressed the two pistons to get clearance for the rotor. But during the compression it was extremely tight... Seem a bit to tight for me...:shock:
You've pretty well answered your own question. I'd rework the caliper, it's an easy job. A stuck caliper is on common cause of drag. Check your pads, they should wear pretty evenly, if one is worn considerably than the other the caliper isn't moving to center itself as it should. If the pistons were hard to push in it might be crud on the outside surface of the pistons from the road. Pushing them in dirty can create leaks. The way to do it is to clean the exposed part of the pistons, I've used a small brass brush, lube them with a bit of brake fluid and then push them in. It would be best of course to take them out, polish them up and reassemble with new seals.

One tricky part is removing and cleaning thesleeve that one of the mounting bolts pass through. To remove the boots on each end of the sleeve without damaging them you need to push the sleeve until one end is about halfway through the caliper which will free the boot on that end. It fits into a groove in the caliper and if you try to pull it off without getting the sleeve pushed in far enough you will just tear it. If the sleeve doesn't want to move easily tap it with a bolt end or drift. The sleeve should move quite freely back and forth in the caliper body. A kit to replace the seals and dust seals is less than $20.

REMEMBER THE BRAKES ARE THE MOST IMPORTANTPART OF YOUR BIKE!
 

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Ok.. Guys...

I took the rear caliper off and used the brake pressure to blow the pistons out. What I found was that under the main seals was a built up of crud under the main seal causing it to swell. This made the piston stick. The piston and the caliper housing where in good shape. So after a good cleaning the pistons pushed in very easy. I also rebled the system front right caliper and rear caliper.

This worked out perfect... It really easy to roll the bike around now. While I was at it I went to bleed the front to find the fronts where very near empty... :shock:So they got bled out and now you could stop on a dime (or maybe like a quarter) :goofygrin:
While you've got the bike laid up for brake repairs check the vacuum advance hose to be sure that it's connected properly and in good condition
Where is this vacuum advance you speak of??? :baffled:Is it the vacuum hose that runs towards the rear of the engine?
 
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