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Does anyone have any info on how to judge the amount of wear in a GL1000 HI-VO chain?

You know, maybe how much bend there should be if held sideways, like we do with a drive chain.

I've looked evreywhere, can't find a thing on this.
 

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strange---anit it !!! and to top it off--- i dont know if you can get a new one . not much help--am i ? bump
 

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I can get a new one, but I dont want to spend £100 unnecessarily when I've got two sitting here. Both came out of fairly high mileage engines but seeing as they are running in an oil bath situation inside the cases that may not mean much.
 

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if it wrere possible to campaire one to a new one. that might give some idea of the wear.
 

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I've pulled the primary chain out of a couple 1100s, neither of them had much sideways flex. Some people claim that the primary chain can slack off and slap making noise but I doubt it. I think they are hearing other mechanical noises or the result of poorly sync'd carbs. Both of the engines I dismantled had high mileage but there was no apparent slack in the primary, certainly no sign anywhere around it that it had been slapping any part of the engine.
 

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When I opened up the final drive gear cover and got a finger in before stripping the engine I could feel the looseness of the chain, so the tensioner was obviously doing very little.

When I opened up the engine and measured the slack in the chain. It had 26mm lift in the slack side !

The chain tensioner has very limited movement, certainly not enough to take up that amount, and strangely enough it had very little wear on the blade pad.

I even fitted the other chain just to see. Virtually the same amount of slack, within 1mm.

The new chain has absolutely no slack, to the point of being very slightly under tension when being assembled!

The old chains showed no signs of distress and would probably have run for a lot longer if I could have put up with the noise or if the tensioner had been a better design.
 

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so the differance between a old high mileage one and a new one is about 1 in. or 26mm . interresting to know.thanks
 

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That's amazing that there was that much slack. 26mm! If you lay the chain on a flat surface how much bend sideways could you get? The two I had didn't flex much sideways at all and they had very little slack maybe 1/4" at most. Both of the engines had mileages in the range of 50-70k miles. One was an engine I salvaged for parts and the other was in an operating bike.
 

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Thanks for those pictures, I really didn't think one would get that badly worn. The two chains I've seen didn't have more than 1/4" play and you had to press pretty hard to see that. It's hard to see how that much slack could have developed in 20k miles. Was there a lot of side play when the chain is flexed sideways? You've made a believer out of me, I never would have thought a primary chain could get sloppy enough to make significant noise.
 

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How could it wear that badly and the bearing surfaces on the mains and rods just not be totally trashed out?

That kind of wear suggests to me, that the engine has more than 200,000 miles on it.

Is it possible that particular chain did not get the proper heat hardening treatment? Cam chains "just don't" wear that badly in normal use.
 

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Cam chains don't have near the load on them as primary chains between the engine and transmission. But I'm still surprised how much slop was in that one.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
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exavid wrote:
Thanks for those pictures, I really didn't think one would get that badly worn. The two chains I've seen didn't have more than 1/4" play and you had to press pretty hard to see that. It's hard to see how that much slack could have developed in 20k miles. Was there a lot of side play when the chain is flexed sideways? You've made a believer out of me, I never would have thought a primary chain could get sloppy enough to make significant noise.
Some sideways movement but not a lot, on both of them. The new one has none.


Old 76 chain;








79 20K? chain




Strangely enough, there was very little wear on the sprung tensioner (yes, it now has a 79 engine) which supports my theory that is badly designed and doesn't really do much.



More engine rebuild pics here, if anyone is interested

http://s298.photobucket.com/albums/mm278/Scabbyrat/Engine strip and build tips/?start=0
 

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just my two cents here but the quality of engine oil used and how hard the bike was rode can cause more wear in those type parts, I would have to see and compare more engines to make a determination that all primary chains are stretched that badly, the primary chain should easily last the life of the bike however many mile that may be who knows, I have heard of these 1100's running over 200,000 miles, also almost all front wheel drive cars and transfercases on fourwheel drive trucks use primarychains to work and under normal conditions they hold up fine. I have seen a primarychain stretched and dragging the case on a chevy fourwheel drive but it was ran about 50,000 mile with no oil in it and the guy didnt no it and he also didnt know he was driving it around locked in four wheel drive the whole time too.
 

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The chain on my GL1100 (46000 miles) has exactlty the same wear of 26mm ( 1 inch) as Old fogey's GL1000. A replacement has been found with difficulty as suppliers of reputes such as David Silver spares have none.
David
 

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I had to change the chain on one many years ago with only somewhere in the region of 40k on the clock, due to the tensioner being tweaked too much. I ended up fitting an automatic tensioner from the later model to avoid all that manual tensioning. Never had a problem after that.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
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Silverfox wrote:
I had to change the chain on one many years ago with only somewhere in the region of 40k on the clock, due to the tensioner being tweaked too much. I ended up fitting an automatic tensioner from the later model to avoid all that manual tensioning. Never had a problem after that.
I'm curious. How do you manually adjust the chain tension, or manage to 'tweak it too much'?:?

As far as I am aware, having rebuilt several of them, the tensioner along with the opposite chain guide, is solidly bolted into the crankcase. The early 1000 had no adjustment possible; the later 1000/1100/1200 have a sprung loaded tensioner plate with no manual adjustment. The sprung plate fitted to the 1100/1200 has a better design than the first sprung one in the 79-79 1000.
 
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