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I've just received a set of 416's which I am currently fitting to my '96 1500.

The problem that I am encountering is that the bushing on the base of the left progressive shock is smaller than the OEM item, therefore the stepped bolt that connects the shock to the swing arm will not fit through the connecting eye of the shock. Am curious to know if anyone else has had this problem ?.
 

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Niall, I'm not surprised and I've heard of this before (is it about a 2mm difference?). Is there enough thickness in the bush that you could drill the bush out? If not, a trip to your local engineering shop to buy a bolt (make sure it's high-tensile) is in order.
 

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GreenWing wrote:
I've just received a set of 416's which I am currently fitting to my '96 1500.

The problem that I am encountering is that the bushing on the base of the left progressive shock is smaller than the OEM item, therefore the stepped bolt that connects the shock to the swing arm will not fit through the connecting eye of the shock. Am curious to know if anyone else has had this problem ?.
The 416's I just took off for rebuild don't have a problem with that. I've got one spare right hand shock bolt and that goes through too.Turning down the bolt might make too much space in the swingarm eye and allow the thing to flex a bit. I'd give Progressive a call and see what they say.

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Phone & Fax Numbers:
--For Literature - 877.690.7411
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--Progressive Suspension, Inc.
--11129 G Avenue
--Hesperia, California 92345 USA[/align]
 

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Thanks Guys,

Looks like the engineering shop is the only answer here, waiting for another package from the 'states willtake to long, it may be possible for a shop to take a couple of mm's off on the grinder, I'm just surprised that the shocks, which are sold as a direct replacement for the OEM parts are different sizes...
 

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Jason wrote:
Niall, I'm not surprised and I've heard of this before (is it about a 2mm difference?). Is there enough thickness in the bush that you could drill the bush out? If not, a trip to your local engineering shop to buy a bolt (make sure it's high-tensile) is in order.
There isn't enough meat in the bushing, it is a pretty thin sleeve. If It were mine I'd just push out the steel bushing and put the bolt through the rubber. That's the way the top eye of these shocks work anyway. If it fit too loose then you could roll your on bushing out of thin stock, the thing doesn't have to be a piece of seamless tubing a wrap of thin material cut so the ends just met would work fine. Likewise it can just be slipped in, it's not going to go anywhere, just needs to take up space it necessary.
 

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Thanks Exavid,

I did actually push the bushing out to see what the fit was like and its a little sloppy, if you reckon that the rolled material idea would be adequete, then that would save me a hell of a lot of aggravation.
 

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You would stand a good chance of getting a bush of the right diameter off the shelf in an engineering shop.
 

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Thanks Martin, The diameter of the shaft is 16.22mm, therefore a bushing with an inside dimension of16.25mm is the perfect size, not sure if these would be available right off the shelf, but its certainly worth a few phone calls.
 

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GreenWing wrote:
Thanks Exavid,

I did actually push the bushing out to see what the fit was like and its a little sloppy, if you reckon that the rolled material idea would be adequete, then that would save me a hell of a lot of aggravation.
It's not a critical fit, just shouldn't be loose. Any shim should suffice to take up the slop, the amount of rotation on the bolt is nearly nil and the rubber isn't likely to hammer through the shim. You could roll up a couple layers of tin can stock around the bolt or a same sized rod and sweat solder, it isn't necessary to solder it solid but you could if you wanted to. If you did that hammer the last 1/8" or so of the tin thin so there won't be a step inside the shim. It isn't necessary either but that's the way to get a real nice smooth round inside.
 

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As a footnote here, I actually went with Jasons original idea of Drilling the bushing. I figured that if I messed up, I wasn't going to use the bushing anyway so it was worth a shot. The bushing itself is made from a very soft steel, and careful drilling on a bench drill with plenty of coolant worked a charm. I now have the Shocks installed and working perfectly, really appreciated all of the advice,

Niall
 

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Nice work Niall. It's better to have a snug fit between bush & bolt. Too much play will result in the bolt eventually breaking from the impact going over bumps.
 

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BenMC wrote:
Nice work Niall. It's better to have a snug fit between bush & bolt. Too much play will result in the bolt eventually breaking from the impact going over bumps.
Not too likely to break, you still have the shock absorbing of the rubber in the eye. I'm happy you were able to drill it out. Your bushing must be a lot thicker than the one in my 416s, it is very thin wall, merely a liner for the rubber grommet in the eye of the shock. There is no bushing in the top eye, just the rubber grommetthatslips over the welded on piece of steel on the bike frame.
 
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