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I just got my 84 GL1200I and noticed that it specifies 91 octane gas. How important is it to use 91 instead of regular?
 

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I used to run hitest in my aspy untill I read some treads from this site about it.I changed to regular and she seems to run better,also no pinging or other problems.
 

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They may have changed the rating system for octane since 1984. I can't imagine that bike requiring anything other than regular. Run regular and if you don't experience pinging or knocking under acceleration, your fine.

Someone with fuel expertise will be along.
 

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I appreciate the responses. That's good enough for me. Just wanted to be sure before I dumped much more regular into it.

Happy riding
 

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All you can do is give regular a try and find out. :)



I had a '82 GL1100, a'84 GL1200 and presently have a '99 GL1500.



None of themtolerated the 87 octaneregular gas we have in South Dakota well, all detonated excessively for my tastes.

There is a 89 octane alcahol blend available that might have been better, but I will not go down that road so it was 91 octane and no more issues.



That is just my experience......gasoline varies to some extent from region to region so you might be able to get away with regular in your area.
 

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I've always ran 87 octane in all of my wings, 1100, 1500 and 1800, never a problem. Bikes don't carbon up using 87 octane compared to 89 or 91, and if your timing and carbs are adjusted correctly, the 87 is what is needed. 87 on the pump is the AKI (Anti Knock Index) which would be the same as a 91-92 RON (Research Octane Number). Running premium fuel unless you have jacked your compression up will eventually require you to use premium fuel due to the excessive carbon buildup, which in these engines don't take long. Yamaha has a carbon remover that is run thru the engine to remove built up carbon, and improve proper combustion. Heck, I've always have even gotten better milage running regular over premium. I won't buy any vehicle that requires premium fuel, because modern electronics and fuel systems and timing systems can compensate for lower rated fuels, and it's a waste of money. Thats one reason that I'll never own another Harley, there is no good reason that they cannot make that engine run properly or regular gas. It's compression is not really that high.:smiler:

Gene:action:
 

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You all make good points. I guess I'll just try regular for a while and see what the results are but Gene makes a great point about not using premium fuel.
Thanks
 

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As more support for the general acceptance of lower octane, I tend to get better mileage and performance with regular. I even used the 85 octane riding two-up and towing a trailer in Utah. I got a little knock on occasion then on hills because it was so hot outside, but nothing even remotely dangerous sounding to this gearhead as it was very minor and only on the stepest portions.
 

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There are differences in how octane is computed. In North America 87 octane is the same as many other countries 91. The Honda manual is calling for gasoline that would be 87 here. Click here if you want the full story.
 

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That was an interesting article that boiled it all down in the last paragraph. Go with the lowest octane that your vehicle can get by on without heavy pinging or knocking. Occasional light pinging or knocking won't harm the engine. And you'll get better mileage to boot.
Thanks everyone!
 

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89 oct. runs my 1500 much better than cheap 87....89 runs the harley good but 91 even better...lower octane makes it peppier... if it doesnt ping...but you get a lttle better top end with the higher oct...but less gas milage...91 in the wing gets a little doggy.
 

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GLester wrote:
Bikes don't carbon up using 87 octane compared to 89 or 91,
Running premium fuel unless you have jacked your compression up will eventually require you to use premium fuel due to the excessive carbon buildup, which in these engines don't take long. Gene

Can you please explain to me why using a premium grade offuel will produce excessive carbon build up in a properly operating engine?
 

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I just run the cheap stuff in mine and have had no issues. I don't feed any of my vehicle the higher priced stuff.
 

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And now to confuse the issue even more, when I first moved to Florida in 1972 I worked for Texaco. I was a tank truck driver delivering gas to the stations. When we ran out of any grade we went to a competitors tank farm and loaded their gas into the Texaco trucks. Dyecould be added to make it a specific color. Other companies did the same and loaded their trucks at our tank farm. When I askedabout this I was told there is no difference in the gas other than color and additives. Most of the claims for additives are greatly exaggerated. Since then I have used regular gas of any brand.Never a gas problem of any kind. The important thing to keep in mind is buy fram a busy station so you do not get old gas and NEVER fill up while the tank truck is delivering gas. When the truck is dumping gas into the tank it is mixing everything in the tank.If the pump is running it will suck that mixture out and deliver it to your tank. You don't want that mix in you gas tank, even very small bits of anything will cause a problem. Back then there were a lot of metal tanks and rust was a problem but I think they have all been replaced by fiberglass. I would wait at least 1/2 hour if there was no other place to get the gas. Also with alcohol in the gas it absorbes water so the older it is the more water it has.
 

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Oh MY Gosh! Do you mean that the gas you get from Safeway may be the exact same gas you get from Costco? :stumped:

Where will this climate of deception and treachery end?

Actually, I think it is well known that the cheapie places get their gas from name-brand tanks, but I'm surprized to hear the biggies swap fuel.

Techron may actually be a tiger...this is confusing. :baffling:
 

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Maddmongo wrote:
GLester wrote:
Bikes don't carbon up using 87 octane compared to 89 or 91,
Running premium fuel unless you have jacked your compression up will eventually require you to use premium fuel due to the excessive carbon buildup, which in these engines don't take long. Gene

Can you please explain to me why using a premium grade offuel will produce excessive carbon build up in a properly operating engine?
Premium (high octane) gas burns slower, which is required in high compression engines, to prevent them from detonating. But in a low compression engine, it actually burns too slow, and infact may not even burn completely. This results in black soot (carbon) being left in the engine, and over the course of time, it bakes as hard as a rock, causing carbon buildup. So in time, your low compression engine will actually become a high compression engine, as the combustion chamber and top of the pistons gradually fills up with carbon, reducing the space inside the combustion chamber. This is NOT a good thing though, Carbon tends to glow red for much longer than steel, and when the incoming fresh air/fuel mixture enters the combustion chamber, it may be ignited by the hot carbon before it is time for the plug to fire, causing pre ignition, a loss of power, and an overheating engine. In the short term, it has the effect of running slightly on the rich side. For an indepth artical on octane rations, check Wikipedia, they have a good one.


My small block Chevy drag race car with an effective (calculated) compression ratio of 11.5:1 requires 100 octane minimum, which is available at the track for just under $7 a gallon.



As for the "moonshine" gas, I will go down that road, that is one of the biggest scams ever layed on the American public. I cannot get into the politics of it here since political discussion is not allowed, but do some research on it. What I will say here, is that it is BAD for your engine, it damages you engine, especially parts of the intake system, by destroying rubber and plastic parts, and coroding metal parts. It causes your engine to make less power, and get lower mileage. It also drives up the cost of gas. Avoid it if you possibly can. Unfortunately in my state, it is unavoidable unless you can afford to run race gas, which has too high an octane rating for regular engines.
 

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JerryH wrote:
Maddmongo wrote:
GLester wrote:
Bikes don't carbon up using 87 octane compared to 89 or 91,
Running premium fuel unless you have jacked your compression up will eventually require you to use premium fuel due to the excessive carbon buildup, which in these engines don't take long. Gene

Can you please explain to me why using a premium grade offuel will produce excessive carbon build up in a properly operating engine?
Premium (high octane) gas burns slower, which is required in high compression engines, to prevent them from detonating. But in a low compression engine, it actually burns too slow, and infact may not even burn completely. This results in black soot (carbon) being left in the engine, and over the course of time, it bakes as hard as a rock, causing carbon buildup. So in time, your low compression engine will actually become a high compression engine, as the combustion chamber and top of the pistons gradually fills up with carbon, reducing the space inside the combustion chamber. This is NOT a good thing though, Carbon tends to glow red for much longer than steel, and when the incoming fresh air/fuel mixture enters the combustion chamber, it may be ignited by the hot carbon before it is time for the plug to fire, causing pre ignition, a loss of power, and an overheating engine. In the short term, it has the effect of running slightly on the rich side. For an indepth artical on octane rations, check Wikipedia, they have a good one.


My small block Chevy drag race car with an effective (calculated) compression ratio of 11.5:1 requires 100 octane minimum, which is available at the track for just under $7 a gallon.



As for the "moonshine" gas, I will go down that road, that is one of the biggest scams ever layed on the American public. I cannot get into the politics of it here since political discussion is not allowed, but do some research on it. What I will say here, is that it is BAD for your engine, it damages you engine, especially parts of the intake system, by destroying rubber and plastic parts, and coroding metal parts. It causes your engine to make less power, and get lower mileage. It also drives up the cost of gas. Avoid it if you possibly can. Unfortunately in my state, it is unavoidable unless you can afford to run race gas, which has too high an octane rating for regular engines.
Jerry explained it very well. And I also agree on his take on the Ethanol or as he calls it "moonshine" gas, especially for those who are running the pre-1800s. I know it is pretty hard to avoid non-ethanol gas, but you can go to http://www.pure-gas.org
and look up to see if there are any stations in your area that sells real gas and you might get lucky.:claps::claps::claps: BTW Jerry, I used to drink moonshine when I was much younger, but would never waste good shine in a engine. That would had been considered alcohol abuse.:shock::shock:

Gene:action:
 

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87 octane is fine on my 84 aspy. Don't get the 15% ethanol blend as that stuff is horrible. Gas mileage drops up to 20% on 15% ethanol. 20% worse gas mileage for adding a 15% blend(do the math). The corn growers are laughing all the way to the bank while the go green pushers are blind to the fact that we use more fuel when that crap is blended in above 5%.
 
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