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I read the post below about towing with out trailer. But my question is what is the proper way to tie a broke down wing on a trailer.

I learned not to go over the plastic.

Any info would be helpful.

Thanks Gary
 

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my way is using a 6x12' (landscape style trailer) with the 16" raised rails (i already owned this trailer & normally tow a jeep on it, it's a tandem axle 7k# rated so a little overkill for the wing). i center the bike on the trailer left to right & put it all the way farward (for tounge weight) & place it on the center stand. i put straps off the forks or front egine guards out to the front corners of the trailer & straps from the rear saddle bag guards to the rear corners (i have used the rear passenger handles in the past but the straps touch the saddle bags & even though it's not enough pressure to break the plastic it did were marks into the paint. the 4 straps out from the engine guards should be enough to stabalize the bike but i also add 2 straps going straight out from the passenger handles to garantee the bike can't flop over.
 

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I just picked up my bike and had to trailer it home on my Kendon trailer. I threaded a couple of straps through the forks immediately above the lower triple trees and out below the fairing on my '82 Aspencade. I then attached the tiedowns to the loops in the straps and cranked it down in order to partially compress the forks and draw the bike's front tire against the chock. You don't want to compress the forks TOO much or could (presumably) damage the fork seals.

Although this was plenty and the bike was quite secure at this point, I also ran a strap through the rear wheel to hold it to the trailer.
 

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I have moved two Goldwings on trailers. One trip was about 250 miles, the other was 740 miles. I put the bike on the trailer and leave it on the side stand. It won't be there long.

I find four locations where ratchet straps can be attached to the bike. I check the routing of the straps as I attach them so they aren't against any plastic parts. The two rear straps pull to the rear and the front straps pull the front wheel against a stop or wheel chock. They are looped through, not hooked. I run the straps around the frame rather than the forks. After looping the straps around a good solid point on the bike I attached them to the trailer.

Now I begin to ratchet the straps on the right side of the bike to pull it up from the side stand. As I do this I make sure the left side straps are short enough to keep the bike upright and the front wheel is pulled snugly in to the chock. Snug all the straps, make sure the bike is straight up, then tighten the straps. The bike is not on any stand.

The bike is supported on its suspension and held upright by the straps. The suspension is slightly compressed. If you leave the bike on the center stand is has no cushion from road hazards and bumps. The stands are to be used only when the bike is parked in the driveway.

The longer trip was from Nebraska to Minnesota, through rain, construction zones, rough roads and lots of traffic. The straps did not loosen and the bike was still on the trailer when we got home. The straps were anchored to the trailer with eye bolts through a 1/2" plywood floor with fender washers top and bottom. They held very well. I do check the straps at every pit stop just for reassurance.

It's a 700 pound motorcycle, not a D9 Cat!
 

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Would caution against using the engine or saddlebag "crash bars" for attachment points. They can and apparently do bend easily if used to strap down your Goldwing. I'm guessing that a ratchet tension device and the angle of the force applied it too much for them and they were not designed for this purpose.

My method has been to remove the side covers and install nylon loops around the side frame - I purchased loops from Cyclemax, but they are widely available.

I then placed loops on the triple tree just above the bottom and secured all with straps.

This method has been successful for me and I did acquire the info somewhere on this site...........


T.
 

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Nylon loops? Do you have a picture of your setup? I want my trailor and Wing ready for when it needs to be trailored because that time is eminate. Have you seen what a towing outfit can do to a perfectly good Goldwing?
 

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Here is my set up. NO KICKSTAND USED!!!!

I tie off to the lower triple tree forward.

Yes I tie off to the rear crash guards just enough to keep the rear from dancin'

















I've also been known to tow this way:D



 

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Lots of different ways here... but one thing I'd never do, that was mentioned, is transport it on the center stand (or side stand either)... they can bend/fail.. keep the wheels on the floor and it will use the suspension of the bike on those big bumps..
 

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jeffy1500 wrote:
Nylon loops? Do you have a picture of your setup? I want my trailor and Wing ready for when it needs to be trailored because that time is eminate. Have you seen what a towing outfit can do to a perfectly good Goldwing?
Am a little technologically challenged and am unable to post pictures (working on that skill!)
to this site.

However, if you check the Cyclemax site you will easily find them listed with picture and all.
They are available at pretty much any motorcycle parts supplier but Cyclemax is who I deal with and they have nice, large pictures for those of us with aging eyesight.

Cheers!

T.
 

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tnoort wrote:
Would caution against using the engine or saddlebag "crash bars" for attachment points. They can and apparently do bend easily if used to strap down your Goldwing. I'm guessing that a ratchet tension device and the angle of the force applied it too much for them and they were not designed for this purpose.

My method has been to remove the side covers and install nylon loops around the side frame - I purchased loops from Cyclemax, but they are widely available.

I then placed loops on the triple tree just above the bottom and secured all with straps.

This method has been successful for me and I did acquire the info somewhere on this site...........


T.
+1,+2 and +3:cool: Most large bike shops have the loops also.

http://www.cyclegear.com/spgm.cfm?L1=&L2=&L3=&L4=&item=TOP_CT25-18-4C_G


JD
 

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I only trailered mine once, and I did the so it won't move method!
 

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I use the lower triple clamp to grab to and compress the forks almost fully, plus I remove the fork cover on the top of the fender otherwise it will be damaged.

I prefer to tie the rear wheel down (unsprung item) as this will allow the bike to absorb bumps in the road, and not risk shock loads on the straps and a possiblity of the straps un-hooking. I have seen so many vehicles on trailers going down the highway that are tied down poorly AND damaging them, and the driver has no clue its happening.


Bill
 

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uhaul motorcycle trailers work great and they're only $16 for 6 hours. Lots of tie down points.
 

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Trike Master
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DO NOT USE TIP OVER BARS TO TIE DOWN THE BIKE
Tip over bars (some mistakening refer to them as crash bars) on the 1800's are designed to be pushed up on (as in when the bike tips over). They are not designed to be pulled down on!
Nor were 1500's and don't ask how I learned this!!!!!!!!!!!
Broken upper rear tip over bar mounting bolt is not an easy thing to remove!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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tfdeputydawg wrote:
DO NOT USE TIP OVER BARS TO TIE DOWN THE BIKE

Nor were 1500's and don't ask how I learned this!!!!!!!!!!!
Awww...........come on..........how'd you learn that?

T.
 

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Tfdeputydaug
My tip over bars are defanatly crash bars and i have had the chance to crash them a cpl times I have also used there tipover quality to.
Wilf
 
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