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I have read the book on the procedure for pulling the back wheel on my 1100. I am fixing to put a new tire on.

Any tips, shortcuts, watchoutfers, or whatever?

Thanks...

:waving:
Also...

On tire size... The first number refers to the width of the tire, the second is the height as a percentage of the width, and the third is the rim size, right? Is it always wise to stay with spec'd sizes, or do some folks play with the sizes to achieve taller speeds, etc.?

My intention is to stay with OEM sizes.
 

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ubarw wrote:
I have read the book on the procedure for pulling the back wheel on my 1100. I am fixing to put a new tire on.
I can't think of any real advantage to changing from OEM tire size. Removing the back isn't difficult. While you're in there it would be a good time to work over the rear caliper if it's in anything but fine shape. One thing I do is to remove the brake rotor from the wheel before wrestling with the tire, that way there's no chance of dropping the wheel on the rotor and risking bending it. Most tires have a dot, Dunlop have a yellow dot that's supposed to go adjacent to the valve stem. It's a good idea to replace the valve stemtoo. Also make sure you put the tire on so that the arrow on the tire will be revolving in the right direction on the bike. I've had good luck hand balancing the wheels. Set up supports for the ends of the axle, level the axle and pin it with nails on either side or a clamp or whatever it takes to keep is from moving or turning. Spin the wheel and when it stops put a small tab of tape on the uppermost part of the side wall. Do it three or four times and you should see which side of the wheel is lightest. Add a press on weight, usually come in 1/4oz size, take off the tape tabs and repeat. When you get the weights right the tape tabs will be spread pretty randomly around the wheel and you're close enough. My new tire balanced down to 1/8oz. I had to cut a weight in half to nail it down.
 

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If you have a lot of chrome on the back of the saddle bags  .. as you remove it... make sketches ,and diagrams... I use lots of Ziploc bags , and label as I go along.../forums/images/emoticons/big_grin.gif most AfterMarket stuff is fastened in its own pecuilar way.. and if often in Imperial  sockets ,not metric... Make sure you know the torques for the brake ,and shock bolts ,and use them properly....left shock bolt  is quite a bit higher than the right ./forums/images/emoticons/confused.gif and the main axel bolt will have a BIG torque... 65 lbs maybe../forums/images/emoticons/shock.gif so you need to have a lot of extensions  to torque this big bolt... and finally ... I found the best accessory is a pile of blocks(4x4's, 6x6, long 2x4's  for levers..), and boards to jack the wheel , and swing arm up and down/forums/images/emoticons/cool.gif  so you can get at the main axel bolt... and a 2x2 soft wood stick about 1 foot long/forums/images/emoticons/confused.gif... and a hammer .. to safetly drift the axel bolt  out (and in)... and of course  a bike jack is a real useful accessory ..  oh... and the left side spacer will almost always "fall" out... /forums/images/emoticons/mad.gifand I am  never sure which way it goes back in..  ... big grin ../forums/images/emoticons/smile.gif..... and I would stay with OEM tire sizes ,  in most cases .. unless your Tire guy is an expert and has experience with  going  to larger sizes on your exact type of bike.. I once added a size larger to my silverWing.. and until the raised lettering wore down .... the rear wheel  dragged ,and scraped on the letters,and the swing arm inside... UGH/forums/images/emoticons/shock.gif !!!.. SilverDave /forums/images/emoticons/emoticonsxtra/cooldj.gif
 

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I did the front tire a month or so ago, and it went pretty well. What I discovered was, soap is your friend.
 

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Might be a good time to check out the wheel bearings as well.
 

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I found it handy to deflate the tyre completely..makes it easier to pull wheel out...same applies to front...
 

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Good tip, daveinozbikes. I will keep that in mind when the time comes for me.
 
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