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ubarw wrote:
I have read the book on the procedure for pulling the back wheel on my 1100. I am fixing to put a new tire on.
I can't think of any real advantage to changing from OEM tire size. Removing the back isn't difficult. While you're in there it would be a good time to work over the rear caliper if it's in anything but fine shape. One thing I do is to remove the brake rotor from the wheel before wrestling with the tire, that way there's no chance of dropping the wheel on the rotor and risking bending it. Most tires have a dot, Dunlop have a yellow dot that's supposed to go adjacent to the valve stem. It's a good idea to replace the valve stemtoo. Also make sure you put the tire on so that the arrow on the tire will be revolving in the right direction on the bike. I've had good luck hand balancing the wheels. Set up supports for the ends of the axle, level the axle and pin it with nails on either side or a clamp or whatever it takes to keep is from moving or turning. Spin the wheel and when it stops put a small tab of tape on the uppermost part of the side wall. Do it three or four times and you should see which side of the wheel is lightest. Add a press on weight, usually come in 1/4oz size, take off the tape tabs and repeat. When you get the weights right the tape tabs will be spread pretty randomly around the wheel and you're close enough. My new tire balanced down to 1/8oz. I had to cut a weight in half to nail it down.
 
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