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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ok I asked the wife for heated gear for christmas. Fast forward...while checking the bank balance online, I noticed a nice healty charge for "something" at cycle gear locally. So its pretty safe to assume santa has delivered. I know that different brands probably have different heating capabilities, but question I have is how low can it go. I have never owned heated gear and was wondering. I have a pretty high tolerance for cold anyway, but the thought of riding with the weather in the teens is intriguing.
 

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Still Learning
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Well, I saw a post on the gl1800riders forum last year of a guy who lives in Alaska that showed him out at -23 deg. with heated gear and a snowmobile suit. All depends on how you dress. Heated gear makes a big difference, have to have heated socks and gloves to keep the digits warm below 30 deg.
 

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I'm telling your wife you been peaking and she should just send all gifts to me. :ROFL::ROFL: Just bought a gerbing liner and haven't used it a whole lot but when I have used it, it's great. Merry Xmas:waving:
 

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The coldest I was in last Winter was -8F.
Aside from layering and using Hippo Hands, I used chemical pocket warmers in my gloves. I've made some heated gear but haven't used it yet.

My issue this year is carb ice. I'm using a different carburetor than last year and that has me looking at what the snowmobiles are doing to deal with it. Well, their all running heated carburetors.

Imagine that. Heated carburetors. I believe they're heating the fuel supply.
 

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I've ridden in 22°F on a GL1800 with a Gerbing jacket liner and Gerbing heated gloves. that is as cold as I would want to go and not even than for a long ride.
 

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I've ridden my previous '01 1800 down to the middle 20s (F) in the mountains between Medford and Klamath Falls. For the first time in the 56 or so years I've been riding I had a completely comfortable ride in the cold. In fact after about forty minutes I had to turn down the heat a bit. I have a Gerbings jacket liner and their G3 gloves. Lovely stuff. On damp days with the temps in the low 40s they make long runs on the slab a lot more pleasant. It's a matter of the slipstream on the rider, higher speed, more heat loss. The old wind chill factor. It isn't only standing around in high winds that accelerate the effect of cold on the body but the same effect occurs when riding in still air.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ok I have the heated gear for christmas. I am not wanting to hook up the electrical to the battery directly (do not want to stack wires on the thing). under the seat appears to be a connector to hook up stuff. Am I correct in assuming I can hook up electronics under the seat? It looks pretty simple, does anyone have a diagram of this connector. I can use my volt meter to figure it out, but I would still like a picture to look at (I am kind of paranoid about that kind of stuff)
 

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Hook it directly to the battery with the inline fuse link, this is the best way. I have ridden on the interstate at 70mph in 20 degree weather and never got cold with the jacket liner and gloves, I used ski bibs for my legs and good wool socks with boots, you will feel bulky but its fun riding.
 

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jclax01,

From where I sit, temperature is one factor, but seeing that you're in St Louis, relative humidity is another chilling factor to consider.

Around here I can tell a huge diference in warmth depending on humiditiy. This morning 8*F with 85%RH, I wouldn't even think about riding, but at 10*F with 20%RH or less, I'll be on the bike and plugged in. even at 25*F the 85%RH will make it all feel much cooler.

Also worth discussing is how 'still' you can keep the air that touches your body... (wind wings, helmet with a visor, balaclava, windproof collars, some sort of wind-breaking outter wear (snow pants have been mentioned), etc.

While I've been out for the occaisional short-hour ride just at or below 10*F (with good dry Colorado air, <25%RH), I'm really not a fan of temps much below 25*F - mostly for the bike itself - Tires won't seem to warm, much colder and the radiators need a little blocking to keep the colant warm enough to do much, and I always freak out about the condition of the un-heated areas like wheel bearings and speedo cables and such - thickened lubes that may have ice (or other) chrystals just kinda mess with my mind; leving me wondering when I'm gonna hear a squeal or break something ...

Just thought I'd add that bit about humidity, chilling is one thing, but wet and chilly is nothing fun, and icing-up is just no fun at all (great photo ops though).

Ease into it, be comfortable and stay careful.
 

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I have used my Gerbing Liner down in single digit temps. It works fine to keep you from getting cold. I were a base layer, long sleeve shirt, Gerbing Liner, then outer windproof jacket. Looking at buying the pant liners next.
I also wear snowmobile gloves with electric grips on the Wing
 

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Still Learning
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Ok I have the heated gear for christmas. I am not wanting to hook up the electrical to the battery directly (do not want to stack wires on the thing). under the seat appears to be a connector to hook up stuff. Am I correct in assuming I can hook up electronics under the seat? It looks pretty simple, does anyone have a diagram of this connector. I can use my volt meter to figure it out, but I would still like a picture to look at (I am kind of paranoid about that kind of stuff)
Did you confess you peeked?????


As to the hook up either to the battery or to an aux fuse panel(won't be under the seat). My aux fuse panel is on my battery between battery and battery cover with a piece of ABS sheet holding the panel in place by the battery stay/brace.
Here is a good write up by Rudy on adding a fuse panel through a relay
http://goldwingtech.info/auxwiring/auxpwrwiring.html
 

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That fuse panel is even cheaper at Autozone CLICK HERE I have that same fuse panel ziptied to the battery hold down brace and hooked directly to the battery with an inline fuse of course. This panel is always live. It works well. That is where I connected my gerbing wiring.
 

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I have mine wired thru a relay. Be careful using many of the accessary connections. The heated gear will draw 5 or more amps and will be too much for some connectors. Thru a relay, it will be fine. Mine is connected via a switched connection. that way no drag when the key is off.

Richard
 

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I have mine wired thru a relay. Be careful using many of the accessory connections. The heated gear will draw 5 or more amps and will be too much for some connectors. Thru a relay, it will be fine. Mine is connected via a switched connection. that way no drag when the key is off.

Richard

Agree about using a relay, in fact ANY accessories should be installed this way. I have 30 amp relay up under the left pocket. It runs my heated gear, 12V sockets for the MP3 and GPS and grip heaters. I have one under the seat for the wife's heated gear and for the 12V feed to the trailer plug. A great way to wire stuff in.
 
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