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This spring I bought my first bike in 18 years - a 2010 Vulcan 900. I've put nearly 11,000km on it since then and have been having a blast. Most of the km have been solo, but my wife and I like to ride two up and decided very early on that the stock seat was junk and replaced it with a Mustang. Much better, but we've come to realize that this combination just isn't ever going to provide the level of comfort we want. This last weekend we took 3 days for a 1200km (~750miles) trip from Edmonton to Banff to Jasper and back home. It was a great weekend, but it has crystalized our thoughts somewhat regarding going to a touring bike. My wife was checking out passenger seating on the miriad of other bikes we came accross and the GW certainly looks the most comfy. We came back home and went to our local shop to sit on a 2010 Kawi Voyager and a 2010 Star Venture Royale. Might test ride the Venture in the next few days. I'm also going to have a look at a few used GW's and hopefully get a test ride or two in.



In my mind right now, we have two general choices if we went for a GW: a mid to late 90's 1500, or a mid 00's 1800. If we were to go for a 1500 I might be able to keep my VN900 as well, but if we spend the money on an 1800 I'd have to sell the Vulcan (which would make me a little sad - I've grown somewhat attached to the sound of the twin).



So my learned friends, if I can ask your indulgience for a few minutes I have a few preliminary questions:

Regardingcomfort - primarily passenger comfort - would there be anoticable differencebetween the 1500 and the 1800?

For the driver - do thetwo handle similarly? (I have never ridden a bike that large)

TheVulcan is the 1st fuel injected bike I've owned and I really appreciate having it. Do the carbs on the 1500'spresent any challenges or are they as bulletproof as I imagine?
( I mean, I'm assuming they must be since they didn't bother to go to fuel injection till the 1800 came out)


I realize the 1800 is a much more powerful bike, but that isn't my focus. My 900 pretty much does everything I want, except offer the degree of comfort we're after for long rides. I've read through the buying guide here which was very helpful, but of course there are still questions...



Are there any other specific issues I should be keeping an eye out for when looking at machines in these two general age categories?



Thanks in advance for any advice/opinions you might offer.



Kerry
 

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Our situations are very similar.  I bought my first bike in a long time last summer -- a Vulcan 500.  My wife didn't like riding on the back of it so I bought a 1989 GL1500.  I kept that and rode it quite a bit throughout the winter.  This summer I upgraded to a 2004 GL 1800.  Really, I was very happy with the 1500, other than it did hesitate somewhat upon takeoff until it warmed up, which usually took about 15 minutes of riding. 


I guess you really want a comparison of the 1500 to the 1800.  When I first made the switch I was a little disapointed in a couple of areas.  Mostly, it was the noise level.  I loved how smooth and quiet the 1500 was.  You could hardly hear it running and the radio sounded great, even at hight speeds.  It was a nice, smooth ride.  I also had a tall windshield on it, which made the ride even more quiet.  I got the 1800 in Michigan and rode it back to Ohio.  The first thing I thought was how much louder it was.  Then, it had a shorter windshield and the top of it was right in my line of sight and I had to either slouch down to look through it, or sit upright as much as I could to see over it.  I learned after the trip home that I could adjust the windshield up to look through it.  After awhile, though, I put the windshield into it's lowest position and have adapted my riding posture for it.  Now, I wouldn't go back to a tall windshield.  

I also noticed on the 1800, that I couldn't hear the radio as well because of the noise level.  Not that the 1800 is overly loud.  It's just not as quiet as I was used to.  At high speeds I either turn the radio off or listen through the headsets.  As far as my wife's comfort, she says she hasn't noticed a real difference between the two.  

Now, after 4,000 miles on the 1800, most of it riding two up, I'm very happy I made the switch.  The 1800 has more of a sport bike feel, which makes it a little more fun riding by myself.  I drive it to work everyday and it handles, to me, as easily as any bike I've ridden.

And it seems to handle a lot better at very slow speeds riding two up.  I was a little uneasy moving slowly in traffic on the 1500 with my wife on the back.  Not so on the 1800.  I love the fuel injection.  It starts right up and off you go.  No hesitation.  I also love the ABS brakes on the 1800.  I think that was the big thing for me.  When we're riding on the interstate 70-80 MPH with trucks and traffic all around us, I just feel better about being on the 1800 than I did on a 22-year old bike. 
 

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Thanks Rodger, that's exactly the kind of comparison I'm looking for - thanks for sharing your experiences.



Kerry
 

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I had a 1500 and loved it and thought I never would want/need an 1800..

I rode a friends 18 and HAD TO HAVE ONE!!!

I have to agree with reckhart, the noise on the 18 is a bit more than the 15.. You lose a SMALL amount of space in the trunk, I could lay my laptop flat in the 15 trunk but have to angle it a bit in my 18.. Other than that, the 18 has the 15 beat hands down..

The 18 has a sport bike feel and the power to match. As for passenger, Da Boss said there is more room on the 18 than the 15. I also have convertable floorboards on my 18 and she loves that.

IMHO, if I had the choice I would pass on the 15 and go for the 18...:waving:
 

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Go for the 15. 15 is like a caddy. 18 is like a buick. :) Just my opinion.
 

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Thanks for the opinions folks. Please keep'em coming.



BTW, I'm going to go look at a 2006 right now. We'll ride 1.5hrs there to get my wife's butt sore and then take the wing for a ride, should be a good test :ROFL:.



Kerry
 

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edmKC wrote:
Thanks for the opinions folks. Please keep'em coming.



BTW, I'm going to go look at a 2006 right now. We'll ride 1.5hrs there to get my wife's butt sore and then take the wing for a ride, should be a good test :ROFL:.



Kerry
Kerry, make sure you have your checkbook with you.. To ride one is to own one. Or don't ride it unless you are really serious about owning one. I took Goldilocks for a test ride on an 1800, and we didn't get out fo the dealership without one. Goldilocks thought this one was Juuuuust right!



An 06 or up is a good choice. They refreshed them in 06, and added heated seat and grips, as well as more radio power. Is the bike an ABS? If so, it will have the GPS system, which isn't great, but sure beats trying to fold a map at 80 MPH. They also addressed the overheating in parade mode issues that the earlier bikes had with larger radiators. I forget what else, but from there they added a few things, but nothing that major. Minor evoloutions, not anything revolutionary.



If I were replacing my 03 non-ABS, I would be looking for an 06 or later, ABS bike.. Preferably in one of the silver / titanium colors, since the look a lot like dirt, and don't show the grime much. They always look clean, weven when filthy.



Let us know what you think after your test ride.. Or tgell us about your new steed..!



=Dave=
 

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Dandy Dave wrote:
Kerry, make sure you have your checkbook with you.. To ride one is to own one. Or don't ride it unless you are really serious about owning one. I took Goldilocks for a test ride on an 1800, and we didn't get out fo the dealership without one. Goldilocks thought this one was Juuuuust right!



An 06 or up is a good choice. They refreshed them in 06, and added heated seat and grips, as well as more radio power. Is the bike an ABS? If so, it will have the GPS system, which isn't great, but sure beats trying to fold a map at 80 MPH. They also addressed the overheating in parade mode issues that the earlier bikes had with larger radiators. I forget what else, but from there they added a few things, but nothing that major. Minor evoloutions, not anything revolutionary.



If I were replacing my 03 non-ABS, I would be looking for an 06 or later, ABS bike.. Preferably in one of the silver / titanium colors, since the look a lot like dirt, and don't show the grime much. They always look clean, weven when filthy.



Let us know what you think after your test ride.. Or tgell us about your new steed..!



=Dave=


Ha ha, I did make sure to take the checkbook, but I'm afraid I didn't make an offer. I'm having a little trouble wrapping my head around the massive difference between my Vulcan and this GW. I rode the Wing myself for a little bit just to get a feel for it before my wife got on the back. Certainly most of the things I've read here and elsewhere were very evident. First, this thing has power! Second, the balance is amazing. I really couldn't feel any differnce between riding solo or two up. Cornering at low speed was effortless.The suspension is amazing. The seating seems very comfortable. This is the ABS/GPS model.

There were a few things that I'm a little uneasy about though:

a) seating position - it's soooo different from my Vulcan. I'm wondering how long (if ever) it'll take to get used to going from the 'lounge chair' seating position of my cruiser to the 'bar stool' position of the GW. I had quite a bit of difficulty shifting (he has a heel toe shifter on there, but it just seems so small) and finding the rear brake. A couple of times when I touched the rear brake there seemed to be a little clunk or something - momentary and not every time - not sure what that was all about. Also, I found that when I stopped and stayed seated I could only get my toes on the ground (I'm 5' 10.5""). The owner has highway pegs on it, but I think I'd have to move them - felt really awkward putting my feet out there.

b) shifting - when I first got on and pulled in the clutch I couldn't get it to shift into first. Tried several times - no go. The owner looked genuinely puzzledabout it. Ireleased the clutch and pulled it in again and it went into first no problem. Anyone seen this before?

c) wind - another thing to get used to I guess. There was really no wind hitting me from the front, but there seemed to be a fair bit of buffeting against the back of my neck. It wasn't terrible, it was just odd.

d) passenger floorboards - my wife couldn't put her feet flat on the passenger floorboards. She had to put her heels on them and have her foot extended out forward. She's 5' 9" - I expect if she was shorter she'd be able to get her feet flat on them. Can they be moved?




Another question that the owner didn't know the answer to - are the handlebars adjustable? Not that they aren't already in a decent position - just from the appearance of them I wondered if they were made to be adjusted?



Cheers,

Kerry
 

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I can't say anything about the 1500, but when I just sat on my 04 1800 I had to have her. I looked at the HD equivalent and wasn't impressed. I sat on the 1800 and fell in love. My wife loved it too (added bonus. lol) this was after 3 months of riding my 80 suzuki gs1000 every day by the shop where my 1800 sat. The noise isn't that bad and goes down depending on the tires. If you are considering going to the darkside on either one, the 1800 has more options for tires. The windshield is about right for me at 5'11". I can lower it below my line of sight and raise it above my line of sight. I've ridden my 1800 for over 20,000 miles now and have only owned her for a little over a year. I would say skip the 1500 unless you like your current bike way too much. the 1800 is sporty and very comfortable. :) happy riding.
 

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edmKC wrote:
Dandy Dave wrote:
Kerry, make sure you have your checkbook with you.. To ride one is to own one. Or don't ride it unless you are really serious about owning one.
What he said. I started riding these things shortly used ones started to appear on the market. It doesn't matter what size you buy, from that day forth nothing else will feel right. Valkyrie, Road King, Concours, none of them feel right any more.



That's a good thing.
 

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edmKC wrote:
There were a few things that I'm a little uneasy about though:

a) seating position - it's soooo different from my Vulcan. I'm wondering how long (if ever) it'll take to get used to going from the 'lounge chair' seating position of my cruiser to the 'bar stool' position of the GW. I had quite a bit of difficulty shifting (he has a heel toe shifter on there, but it just seems so small) and finding the rear brake. A couple of times when I touched the rear brake there seemed to be a little clunk or something - momentary and not every time - not sure what that was all about. Also, I found that when I stopped and stayed seated I could only get my toes on the ground (I'm 5' 10.5""). The owner has highway pegs on it, but I think I'd have to move them - felt really awkward putting my feet out there.

b) shifting - when I first got on and pulled in the clutch I couldn't get it to shift into first. Tried several times - no go. The owner looked genuinely puzzledabout it. Ireleased the clutch and pulled it in again and it went into first no problem. Anyone seen this before?

c) wind - another thing to get used to I guess. There was really no wind hitting me from the front, but there seemed to be a fair bit of buffeting against the back of my neck. It wasn't terrible, it was just odd.

d) passenger floorboards - my wife couldn't put her feet flat on the passenger floorboards. She had to put her heels on them and have her foot extended out forward. She's 5' 9" - I expect if she was shorter she'd be able to get her feet flat on them. Can they be moved?




Another question that the owner didn't know the answer to - are the handlebars adjustable? Not that they aren't already in a decent position - just from the appearance of them I wondered if they were made to be adjusted?



Cheers,

Kerry




Kerry,



Not every bike is ideal for every butt. I started on Honda's and Kawasaki's when I was stationed in Japan some 40 years ago, so the UJM "barstool" (I love the description... perfect... ) works well for me. That said, if you are looking for a touring bike, the Goldwing is arguably the finest example available, bar none. Seating position is personal preference. But I think that sitting directly on your butt rather than on your tailbone will allow you to ride longer and be in better shape after 400 or more miles in a day. The Wing is more of a handling bike than cruisers are. As such, you need a riding position that lets you work with the bike better. Some peoplesay the Wingis a sportbike with bags. A couch-rocket. It'll never be a 15 year old gymnast, but it is more like a 35 year old aerobics instructor.. The fat girl can dance..

You might find this enlightening, if you haven't seen it..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0nrMQ3QwyPo

As always, seating position and ergos are whateveryou like best is best for you, and are often impacted by what we are used to. I just couldn't see hustling a bike through the twisties on my back. I guess I'm just not old enough toneed to lie down when I ride.. :action: ButI am tooo old for the fetal position, so sport bikes don't work for long rides for me. I like to sit up and be alert..



Shifting/Floorboards. I think the shifting issues and the floorboards are related.Personally, floorboards on a Wing drive me nuts. I haven't seen a set that integrated well with the Wing's controls. Personally, I'd yank them off first thing and go back to pegs. They could also be contributing to your flat foot issue. I'm 5'6" with a 29" (on a good day) inseam, and I can flat foot pretty well. I can definitely flat foot a stock wing with some mileage on it. (the seat padding compresses a bit, and the springs get a bit tired.) Was the suspension preload set up high? That would raise the bike a bit.Orwas/istheowner a big guy, and has made some changes to tailor the bike for him?



Wind. Protection from the elements is important if you are goingto sit in the saddle and ride in all types of weather. Rain, cold, bugs, windblast, all make you uncomfortable and contribute to sapping your energy. There are a number of aftermarket windshields and air management options. As this is a used bike, does the owner have any non-stock items like a different screen installed? If not, and you want more of the wind expereience, there are options like a short WindBender. The buffetting is helped by hand wings under the mirrors, and air wings off the sides of the fairing. Does he have any air management installled? (I think the hand wings are absolutely neccessay, BTW. The only mandatory accessory for a Wing.)


http://www.firecreekacc.com/windbender_hp.htm

http://bakerbuilt.com/bbairwings/h18hw.html



Passenger floorboards.. Hmm.. that's kind of odd. Usually, the boards are too low.. At least for my wife.. But she's shorter than your wife. I would kind of expect that they'd be OK for a 5'9" person, unless they were exceptionally long-stemmed. Again, did the owner change them? I have risers on for my wife, and bring them up about 2 inches. Perhaps he does? If they are in their stock position, I'm not aware of any lowering kits, but maybe someone else can chime in if they know of something.



The handle bars are not adjustable. There are a number of riser kits that will adjust them if you need, usually back and up a bit, sometimes in or out. Most of the ones that adjust back put a fair amount of strain on the hoses, so I'm not sold on them. There is a set that is just little wedges that just move the bars up a touch. I have those, and like them.




You are the one who needs to choose the bike that works best for you and the riding you intend to do. If you are into long distance rides, several hundred miles in a day, for several days, the Goldwing in the best bike made for that job. I can get about 400-450 miles a day out of my wife. That's pretty good miles for a car. And she once said to me "You know, it really isn't a ride unless we've gone a couple of hundred miles, is it?" :smiler:It also does well for day trips, rides on more interesting roads, and just around town. Mine is my daily commuter in the summer. Power, handling, luggage capacity, good weather protection.. Works for me.

If you need something more like a cruiser with bags than a sport bike with bags, your thoughts of the Yamaha /Star are right in line, I'd think.. A nice bike, so I'm told. Another option, if you can get past the looks (the thing looks like it was designed by Buck Rodgers 7 year old daughter on crack, homlier than a carload of a$$holes..) might be the Victory Vision. I test rode one, and although is was certainly no Wing, from a rider's standpoint, it's a respectable effort. The handling was OK, the ride was acceptable, it had reasonable power, and it had a really nice bunch of amenities, including an electric windshield. (C'mon, Honda! Wake up! a $25K plus top of the line touring bike without an electric windshield? And don't give ne that crap about no room, you can fit a windshield wiper to the Japanese models...) The bags were much smaller inside than they look from the outside, and they hit my wife in the back ofher legs, so she didn't much like it. You wife, with longer legs, would probably have a different experience.



So, the bottom line here is get the bike that fits you and your intended riding style the best. If you want to eat miles, a Wing is certainly a good choice.But, there are alot of Harley guys out there who are serious riders, too. Their bikes work for them. (I won't go into Harley shortcomings, like ride, power, handling,vibration here. This is a Goldwing site, and we're all hardcore loyalists..) And there are other valid options. Try everything youcan, get the one that is best for you.

Sorry for the long post. I guess you just hit a button for me..



=Dave=
 

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Dandy Dave wrote:
The fat girl can dance..

You might find this enlightening, if you haven't seen it..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0nrMQ3QwyPo

Wow, I almost got vertigo watching that! LOL No, I hve no doubts about the handling abilities of the Wing. I could tell as soon as I got on it that handling was not going to be an issue.


Shifting/Floorboards. I think the shifting issues and the floorboards are related.Personally, floorboards on a Wing drive me nuts. I haven't seen a set that integrated well with the Wing's controls. Personally, I'd yank them off first thing and go back to pegs. They could also be contributing to your flat foot issue. I'm 5'6" with a 29" (on a good day) inseam, and I can flat foot pretty well. I can definitely flat foot a stock wing with some mileage on it. (the seat padding compresses a bit, and the springs get a bit tired.) Was the suspension preload set up high? That would raise the bike a bit.Orwas/istheowner a big guy, and has made some changes to tailor the bike for him?

I think you are probably bang on here. It really did feel like the floorboards added a level of awkwardness. He was a big tall fellow (really nice older guy, which helps) but I'm pretty sure he said it was stock other than the boards, the spoiler and some chrome. I've emailed him to double check that there weren't any suspension changes. I have no idea how the preload was set up - didn't think to check.



Wind. Protection from the elements is important if you are goingto sit in the saddle and ride in all types of weather. Rain, cold, bugs, windblast, all make you uncomfortable and contribute to sapping your energy. There are a number of aftermarket windshields and air management options. As this is a used bike, does the owner have any non-stock items like a different screen installed? If not, and you want more of the wind expereience, there are options like a short WindBender. The buffetting is helped by hand wings under the mirrors, and air wings off the sides of the fairing. Does he have any air management installled? (I think the hand wings are absolutely neccessay, BTW. The only mandatory accessory for a Wing.)


There were no accessories that I could see related to wind. Good to know there are options here though and maybe I can find something to alleviate what I felt.




The handle bars are not adjustable. There are a number of riser kits that will adjust them if you need, usually back and up a bit, sometimes in or out. Most of the ones that adjust back put a fair amount of strain on the hoses, so I'm not sold on them. There is a set that is just little wedges that just move the bars up a touch. I have those, and like them.


I had to add risers to my Vulcan. I don't think the stock bars on the wing were in a bad spot - more that they just look like they can be moved because they're not just a solid pipe like my Vulcan.


You are the one who needs to choose the bike that works best for you and the riding you intend to do. If you are into long distance rides, several hundred miles in a day, for several days, the Goldwing in the best bike made for that job. I can get about 400-450 miles a day out of my wife. That's pretty good miles for a car. And she once said to me "You know, it really isn't a ride unless we've gone a couple of hundred miles, is it?" :smiler:It also does well for day trips, rides on more interesting roads, and just around town. Mine is my daily commuter in the summer. Power, handling, luggage capacity, good weather protection.. Works for me.

Right you are! Unfortunatly, I'm convinced that no amount of short test riding is going to tell me what I need to know. I think the only way I'm going to know that a wing is really for us is to get one and put some miles under us. I think the price this fellow is asking is pretty fair and I suspect if I wanted to sell it again in a year or two I wouldn't really be out much/anything.



Getting closer.....
 

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I think you are probably bang on here. It really did feel like the floorboards added a level of awkwardness. He was a big tall fellow (really nice older guy, which helps) but I'm pretty sure he said it was stock other than the boards, the spoiler and some chrome. I've emailed him to double check that there weren't any suspension changes. I have no idea how the preload was set up - didn't think to check.


I heard back from the seller who said he hadn't had anything changed height-wise, other than the preload. In a nice surprise - he said he still has the original pegs, shift leaver, and brake lever/pedal so I could put those back on straight away with no extra cost.



I spoke with the service dept at the dealership where he bought it and was having it serviced and they confirmed it's only ever had regular oil changes (more often than called for in fact) and a set of new tires about 5,000km ago.



I'm having a lien check done now and will go see it again on Sunday, and probably buy it. I was speaking to a fellow I know at work who has one so got a little more encouragement as well. Too bad winter's coming soon, but maybe I'll get lucky and we'll have a long fall and at least one nice weekend:).
 

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Good for you!



:claps::claps::claps:



I'm sure you will enjoy your new bike once you get usedto it, and once you add some things to make it yours.



Let us know how you make out, and what you think.



=Dave=
 

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I have ridden but not owned both the 1500 and the 1800 (my boss has owned both, and currently has an 1800). I would take the 1500 hands down if it were new. It is a much better bike for what I want. It is more comfortable, and much quieter. And it seems to hold more stuff. It also has carbs (I don't like or trust digital fuel injection and it's super expensive electronic parts that are long out of warranty.

As for the "sport" thing, that is the last thing I want. I spent years riding sportbikes, and am no longer physically capable of riding them, and no longer have any interest in them. I now want a '70s Cadillac on 2 wheels. Something I can ride all day in comfort, something that just floats over the road. I wish they still made the 1500.

And there lies the problem. The newest 1500 available is over 10 years old, and I am finding out Goldwings are not quite as reliable as I thought. The basic mechanicals on the 1500 seem mostly ok, it's all the toys that fail. Most of the 1500s for sale in my area have high mileage for the price, I may eventually take a chance on one. I would like to get a good one before there are no good ones left, but the problem is, how do you KNOW it's a good one? And Goldwings tend to be very difficult to work on, even for a very mechanically inclined person. Add to that that they are now over 10 years old, and parts will be getting scarce in the not too distant future.
 

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The first time I rode a GW I too thought the sitting position was very uncomfortable. In fact, I disliked it so much that I quit looking at them and bought my Vulcan 500. I eventually kept thinking about a GW though, and finally sold the Vulcan and bought one. I haven't thought twice about the riding position since. I wonder now how I ever slouched down to ride before. I rode for almost seven hours today in temps up to 100 degrees and never felt uncomfortable. As far as the wind buffeting, once you adjust the windshield to the way you want it, it should be fine. I fought wind buffeting on my Vulcan the whole time I had it. I can ride the GW as fast as I want for miles and wind buffeting is not a problem. You should follow your instincts, but I can't see me riding anything but a GW. And it's turned my wife into a motorcycle mama. She definitely wants to ride more than I do.
 

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Well, here she is:





Got it on Tuesday. Did some cleaning and adjusting the highway pegs and a little riding, but not too much yet. Figuring I'll change the oil this weekend and look over the maintenance items in the manual. I'm hoping we'll get in a day-trip before the weather starts turning cold.



I think I'll keep my Vulcan around just for fun, for a while anyway. Might modify it a bit for solo riding. We'll see how it goes.



Other than oil, anyone care to suggest what else I should do with it (maintenance wise) sooner than later? The tiresonly have 5,000km on them, soI should be good there for a while.



I find the cruise control seems to 'lag' a bit before it locks on - how normal is that? What I mean is if I'm cruising at 100kph and hit the'set' button and release the throttle, it takes about 5 seconds before the cruise kicks in and it will haveslowed down to maybe 90kph by then, and then picks the speed back up to 100kph and keeps it there. It holds the 100kph very well,it's just that initial 'lag' that I'm wondering about. Itthought I came accross something (on this site maybe?) that talked a bit about this, but I'll have to go looking again. That's the only issue I have so far, and thankfully it's pretty minor.


Man, this thing can move!


Kerry
 

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Very Nice! Congratulations! I'll bet you're grinning from ear to ear! :jumper::jumper::jumper:I'm sure you will really like it as soon as you get used to it..

You're right, the fat girl can really boogie, can't she?

Maintenance: How many miles? It's a 2006, have the brake & clutch fluids been changed? And the coolant? They need to be done every couple of years. The valves get checked at 32K miles, about 50K kilometers, I think.
Other than that, make sure it's got gas, check the tire pressures, and ride. They are very reliable, don't ever use oil, just gas.. lots of gas.. :cheesygrin: Lots of miles.. or Kilometers..

The cruise control lag is a known issue. i don't see why they couldn't teach the people who were putting them together the right adjustment, but they didn't. There is a procedure to adjust them. You need to take up about 4 turns on the adjusting nut right near the cruise control box under the shelter. it's pretty easy to do, once you are there. The real issue is getting to it. It's easier if you take the shelter off. People have done it without, but I would wait until the next time the shelter is off and adjust it or ask that it be adjusted.
Here's a link: http://gl1800riders.com/forums/showthread.php?t=235366&highlight=cruise+%3Cspan%20style=

<edit> I almost forgot.. don't move the highway peg arms below the horizontal.. they will touch down and might lever the back end off the pavement.. not good. If you ride with abandon.
 

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Update: I changed the oil and the plugs and the air filter, and while I was in there I adjusted the cruise - thanks for that link, it works like a charm now. We've managed to get a couple of thousand kms on it so far, but the weather's getting pretty cool. I'm going to change the brake and clutch fluids next. Soon enough it'll be time to button up for winter :-(

This is going to be a loooonnnnng winter....
 

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Friend of Bill W.
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I kept my cruiser for a year. It wasn't comfortable to me anymore so it just sat, so I sold it. No regrets.

I have a 1500 and I am considering moving to an 1800 so all of this comparison information has been good for me.

However, my bike only has 41,000 miles on it... good tires and all the maintenance done. It is ready to ride, so it is hard to replace something that is so ready to go when I am.
 
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