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I did a search and couldnt really find much besides the CT discussions. I have a Shinko Radial on the front, and a rear Metzeler Bias (if I read the tire correctly). The Victory dealer has a handful of tires on sale. Havent looked at the date yet, but they have a Metzeler front radial in the mix. I guess my question is on mixing bias and radial. I've put about 8K on the setup I have now, and really havent noticed any difference in the ride.

Here's what I have now:

Front: Shinko 130/70 R18 M/C 63H (Assuming the R18 is Radial 18")

Rear: Metzeler ME880 160/80 B 16 M/C 75H (Assuming the B 16 is Bias 16")

I've put about 10K on the Shinko and not sure how much the PO put on it (not much, probably less than 1K,they got ribbed by their HD riding buddies for having an "old man's bike", that's why I own it now).

The Shinko really needs replaced, the radial Metzeler is a pretty good deal.

Thanks in advance...
 

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well, I think the rims on a 1500 are set to take bias tires, not radial, so you may have a safety issue, by running a radial on a bias rim.

this I'm certainly not sure of,but it might pay to check out that issue first.

cheers,
 

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first off, NEVER mix radials with bias, they handle way to differently. second, like they say. the bike as many articles as i have read is not designed to ride on radials. it has to do with handling issues. there are many experts here that will give you much more detailed info. but one thing is for sure, don't mix the tires. good luck
 

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thanks guys, more info anyone, I am kinda like Johnny #5, need input...
 

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Radial and bias mixed or either way on a motorcycle makes no difference that I can tell. Radial motorcycle tires are not at all like radial car tires, I don't know what the tire makers were after when they started making radials for bikes but they missed the mark. I run a bias MT on the front of my 1800 with a radial car tire on the rear and it handles and rides and grips the road far better than with a set of motorcycle radials.
 

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Bill I have a set of Shinko radials on the 90 1500 and a set of Metzler me880 on the 96. By far the Shinko radial is my favorite. The bike rides a lot smoother. Handles better. The only thing I have ever seen that I didn't like was while riding 2 up in heavy rain, it felt a little loose compaired to the ME880 Metzler. I have heard a lot of people saying do not use a radial on a 1500. But I have never heard from anyone that tried them that had a complaint.
 

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I guess the more I dig into this, the more I want to know why the radials arent "designed" for the 1500. The Shinko never seemed to slip up in the rain (but I am not an aggressive rider, especially in the rain). Plus I have had a bias ME880 on the rear, and the Radial Shinko on the front, and really never noticed any difference in the ride.

I've done some "googling" on the issue, nothing really notable, aside from the tire companies not to mix them, but no reason why. The only thing that might play into it slightly (and not really much at all), is heat. One place said bias tires run slightly hotter because they are thicker because of the cross pattern of the plys as opposed to the radials that run the circumference of the tire, not crossing.

If we are talking about the heat issue, I wouldnt think it would matter because regardless if you had a pair of bias, or one of each, the bias is going to create a certain amount of heat. I wouldnt think either axle would have any effect on the other.

Lets say the bias creates 150 degrees of heat and the radial creates 100. Why would the rear bias have ANY effect on the front. Same scenario, two bias tires creating 150 degrees for both. Your rear bias is still 150 degrees. Someone enlighten me if I am missing something.

Things that make you go hmmmmmm...
 

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There is no difference in rim profiles (bias vs radials).. that is a myth... usually rims for radials are significantly wider for radials for the same tire profile, but doesn't have anything to do with fitting on the rim.. the wider rim reduces rolling, which the radial is more prone to do, particularly with low pressures

Mixing radials and bias on cars is a handling issue (i.e., the slip angle which makes one end or one side sliding more than the other while turning)... With only two tires on the road as a motorcycle, I can't see this being more than something one needs to get used to... there will be no conflicting forces.. and no unusual tire wear
 

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sandiegobrass wrote:
There is no difference in rim profiles (bias vs radials).. that is a myth... usually rims for radials are significantly wider for radials for the same tire profile, but doesn't have anything to do with fitting on the rim.. the wider rim reduces rolling, which the radial is more prone to do, particularly with low pressures

Mixing radials and bias on cars is a handling issue (i.e., the slip angle which makes one end or one side sliding more than the other while turning)... With only two tires on the road as a motorcycle, I can't see this being more than something one needs to get used to... there will be no conflicting forces.. and no unusual tire wear
SDB nailed it. My best friend rides a 97 1500, and he is on his third front radial, and his first rear radial. Twice now he has run radial on the front with bias on the rear.



He rides hard, peg scrapping all the time. Never had a problem.
 
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